CPLIT-PHD - Comparative Literature (PhD)

Program overview.

Graduate Degrees describes university requirements for the PhD.

The PhD program is designed for students whose linguistic background, breadth of interest in literature, and curiosity about the problems of literary scholarship and theory (including the relation of literature to other disciplines) make this program more appropriate to their needs than the PhD in one of the national literatures. Students take courses in at least three literatures (one may be that of the native language) to be studied in the original. The program is designed to encourage familiarity with the major approaches to literary study prevailing today.

Before starting graduate work at Stanford, students should have completed an undergraduate program with a strong background in one literature and some work in a second literature in the original language. Since the program demands advanced knowledge of two non-native languages and a reading knowledge of a third non-native language, students should, at the time of application, have an advanced enough knowledge of one of the three to take graduate-level courses in that language when they enter the program. They should be making enough progress in studying a second language to enable them to take graduate courses in that language not later than the beginning of the second year and earlier if possible. Language courses at the 100- or 200-level may be taken with approval from the Director of the department or the Chair of Graduate Studies. 

Students are admitted under a financial plan that attempts to integrate financial support and completion of residence requirements with their training as prospective university teachers. However, some students pursue other career paths. Assuming satisfactory academic progress, fellowship support as a PhD student lasts five years. Under some circumstances, sixth-year funding may be available. 

Application Procedures

Competition for entrance into the program is exceptionally keen. The program is kept small so students have as much opportunity as possible to work closely with faculty throughout the study. Applicants should carefully review all course and examination requirements, advancement requirements, and teaching obligations before applying to the program. Because of the unique nature of comparative literary studies, the statement of purpose included in the application for admission must contain the following information:

A detailed description of the applicant’s present breadth of proficiency in each of the languages studied, indicating the languages in which the applicant is prepared to do graduate work at present and outlining plans to meet additional language requirements of the program.

A description of the applicant’s area of interest (for instance, theoretical problems, genres, periods) within literary study and the reasons for finding comparative literature more suitable to their needs than the study of a single literature. Applicants should also indicate their most likely prospective primary field, including the literatures on which they intend to concentrate.

An explanation of how the applicant’s undergraduate education has prepared them for work in our program. If there are any gaps in the applicant’s preparation, a plan to address those gaps should be discussed.

The applicant’s reasons for wishing to study in the department.

The application itself must also include:

A letter of recommendation that focuses on the applicant’s language skills, a current ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) certificate, or a critical paper written in a non-native language.

Recommendations from faculty members in at least two of the literatures in which the student proposes to work, if possible. 

A writing sample the candidate considers to represent their best work, preferably demonstrating a comparative analysis.

See  Graduate Admissions  for more information.

Comparative Literature

phd literature stanford

Al Mahdi Alaoui

John Bender

John Bender

Alan Burnett Valverde

Alan Burnett Valverde

phd literature stanford

Margaret Cohen

phd literature stanford

Myrial Holbrook

Helena Hu

Benjamin Libman

phd literature stanford

Mpho Molefe

Franco Moretti

Franco Moretti

phd literature stanford

Jesuseyi Osundeko

Patricia Parker

Patricia Parker

Nancy Ruttenburg

Nancy Ruttenburg

phd literature stanford

Elaine Treharne

PhD Funding

All Ph.D. students admitted to the program receive five years of 12-month financial support which is typically provided as fellowship stipend and tuition.

For information on estimated expenses for graduate students, please see: https://gradadmissions.stanford.edu/admitted-students/financing-graduate-study/estimated-expense-budget .

Teaching is an integral part of the Ph.D. Program in MTL: it is part of Ph.D. candidates’ professional training, prepares them well for the job market, and contributes to their university funding.

Students may be eligible for additional limited funding for academics and research. 

FAQs: PhD Minor

A Ph.D. Minor provides official certification of a rigorous curricular program, showing that you are qualified for high level interdisciplinary teaching and research. The Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts (PLA) provides both rigorous training in the student’s minor field and an exciting program of courses at the interdisciplinary boundary of philosophy with literature and the arts. Students in the program work together with faculty and fellow students in an exciting community of scholars from across Stanford humanities.

Students who complete the Minor will have rigorous interdisciplinary training, providing real grounding in the scholarly standards and methods of their minor field (philosophy for students in literature and the arts, and literary or arts criticism for philosophers). They will be prepared for teaching and research that combines nuanced criticism with sophisticated philosophical analysis.

Literature and the arts offer especially rich cultural artifacts, and the investigation of how they produce their many effects raises far-reaching philosophical problems, including questions about the nature of fictionality, the meaning and effects of figurative language, the nature of depiction, the role of the imagination, the nature and function of authorship, and many more. Many domains of philosophy (questions of value, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, etc.) can be explored in distinctive ways through the arts and imaginative literature.

Students are encouraged to join the graduate Focal Group in Philosophy and Literature, which provides opportunities to present work in progress to peers and faculty working in the area and to participate in scholarly exchange. In some cases, the Minor also involves independent research, conducted under the guidance of a faculty member. By the time of the dissertation, students should have the grounding necessary for genuinely interdisciplinary dissertation research.

The Core seminar is team taught by a philosopher and a literary or arts critic. Different teams will focus on different questions (and different texts) at the interdisciplinary boundary, but the seminar will always have the goal of introducing students to a range of such topics. The Core seminar is an excellent opportunity to connect with other students across the humanities who are interested in philosophy, literature, and the arts. Because the seminar content will vary across teaching teams, it may be repeated for credit; repetition may count toward Minor requirements.

The DLCL Philosophy and Literature Focal Group sponsors an active program of events each year, including presentations of work in progress by Stanford graduate students and faculty, faculty book talks, and lectures and seminars led by prominent visiting scholars in the field. We also sponsor conferences exploring specialized topics. A list of past events can be found  here .

Students must file one-page declaration of intent to the PLA Minor DGS and an “ Application for Ph.D. Minor form ” through their graduate department. (In the “Program of Study” line on the form, students should enter “Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Subplan.”) Students should also schedule an initial meeting with the Minor DGS, who will assign a faculty advisor for the Minor after consultation with the student.

The Philosophy and Literature Focal Group is open to all comers. We encourage you to become a full-fledged member of the Focal Group; to do so, please email Joshua Landy (landy AT stanford.edu). To be added to the focal group mailing list for events, please email one of the coordinators, listed here . (It is helpful to identify yourself as a student interested in the Minor.) Students may receive units for focal group participation by registering for DLCL 222, but you can also participate without registering for units.

All students in the minor take DLCL 333 (Core seminar in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts), which explores key topics at the interdisciplinary boundary. Students then take at least four additional courses for a total of at least 20 units. This includes a two-course program of study in the minor field and two courses of special relevance to the intersection of philosophy with literature and the arts. Finally, the 20-unit total also includes independent summer research, ideally conducted in the summer after the first year.

These are courses offered by Stanford faculty at the intersection between philosophy and literature or the arts. The committee in charge of the program surveys the curriculum each summer and identifies courses that are of special relevance to students working at the interdisciplinary boundary. The list of those courses (including for past years) can be found  here . (N.B.: The listing also includes many undergraduate courses for students involved in the Philosophy and Literature major tracks; where appropriate, graduate students should register for such courses under a graduate number. In some cases, such as introductory seminars, it will not be possible to do this.) If you have a question about a course, or have identified a graduate course you think should be listed, please direct your inquiry to the PLA Minor DGS or the program co-Directors.

The first port of call should be your Minor Advisor (assigned by the PLA Minor DGS), who will usually have valuable insight into course offerings in the department(s) of your minor field. The Minor DGS is also available for consultation, and insight into structuring a helpful program of study can in addition be sought from the co-Directors, Joshua Landy (Comparative Literature) and Lanier Anderson (Philosophy).

Yes; but students in this situation may need to take more than 20 units and should consult with the Minor DGS. If your regular Ph.D. coursework does not involve substantial exposure to either philosophy or literary and arts criticism, then you should pursue a program of courses in both areas as part of your work toward the Minor.

Yes; Stanford does permit students to complete multiple minors. Students are advised, however, that each minor must involve 20 units of unduplicated coursework. All minors must be approved by the home department, and students should plan carefully to ensure that their work in the minors does not delay their time to TGR (or to procure departmental approval for any delay).

In principle, yes; but units applied to a minor may not be applied to an M.A. degree. Students interested in the PLA Minor should probably choose between completing the minor and the (more involved) pursuit of a Masters in the minor field. Students working toward an M.A. in some further field, separate from both the home department and the PLA Minor, should plan very carefully to ensure all requirements can be completed before TGR.

Yes; units completed for a Ph.D. minor count toward the 135-unit requirement for the Ph.D. degree. However, minor units may not be counted toward the separate (lower) coursework unit requirement within the major department; the 20 units counted toward the minor are “unduplicated” in that sense. If a student needs a course of special relevance (or some other course taken for the minor) to meet a departmental distribution or area requirement, the course may be counted for both a minor and a departmental requirement, as long as there are still 20 unduplicated units counted toward the minor.

No; all units for the minor must be completed at Stanford.

Yes; both your transcript and diploma will note that you have completed a “Ph.D. Minor in Philosophy Literature and Arts.”

The Minor can be declared any time prior to TGR status. Students should note, however, that all units counted toward the minor must be completed prior to TGR, so they should plan carefully to complete all coursework requirements, including the Core Seminar (which is often offered in Spring).

No; unfortunately, units taken after advancement to TGR cannot be counted toward any Ph.D. coursework or unit requirements, including any Ph.D. minors.

If you have taken at least 20 units of coursework falling under other requirements of the PLA Minor, and these do not duplicate any units counted toward the unit requirement for your major department, then you may petition the PLA Minor DGS to add the minor. Successful petitions will normally involve a plan to audit the Core seminar with active participation; success may also depend on how closely previously-taken courses correspond to minor requirements.

Ph.D. in Korean Literature and Culture

The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare students for a doctoral degree in Korean literature and culture.

Students should consult the most up-to-date version of the degree plan on the  Stanford Bulletin  as well as the  EALC Graduate Handbook . Each student should meet with their faculty advisor at least once per quarter to discuss the degree requirements and their progress.

Admission to Candidacy

Candidacy is the most important University milestone on the way to the Ph.D. degree. Admission to candidacy rests both on the fulfillment of department requirements and on an assessment by department faculty that the student has the potential to successfully complete the Ph.D.

Following University policy ( GAP 4.6.1 ), students are expected to complete the candidacy requirements by Spring Quarter of the second year of graduate study.

Pre-Candidacy Requirements

Demonstrate proficiency in modern Korean by completing the following courses for a letter grade of B or higher or by demonstrating an equivalent level of linguistic attainment by passing the appropriate certifying examinations.

  • KORLANG 213 - Fourth-Year Korean, Third Quarter (4 units)
  • EALC 201 - Proseminar in East Asian Humanities I: Skills and Methodologies (3 units)
  • EALC 202 - Proseminar in East Asian Humanities II: Current Scholarship (1 unit)

Complete eight advisor-approved courses numbered above 200 from the offerings of the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. At least four of these eight courses must be advanced seminars numbered above 300, and two of these eight courses should be numbered at or above the 200-level and offered by departments outside EALC in consultation with the student’s advisor.

All Doctoral students must complete an MA qualifying paper. An MA thesis is accepted instead of a qualifying paper for students initially admitted as EALC MA students. Students seeking an MA en route to the PhD must secure approval from the primary advisor and submit an MA thesis.

A graded MA qualifying paper or thesis must be submitted to the DGS and SSO with an accompanying note from the student’s primary advisor by week five of spring quarter of the second year of study for the annual review and candidacy decision.

During the quarter when students complete the MA qualifying paper or thesis (25-30 pages), they must enroll in  EALC 299 .

Teaching Requirement

  • DLCL 301 - The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages (3 units)

Demonstrate pedagogical proficiency by serving as a teaching assistant for at least three quarters, starting no later than autumn quarter of the third year of graduate study. The department may approve exceptions to the timing of the language teaching requirement.

Post-Candidacy Requirements

Demonstrate proficiency in at least one supporting language to be chosen in consultation with the primary advisor according to the candidate’s specific research goals. For the supporting language, students must be proficient at the second-year level, at the minimum; a higher level of proficiency may be required depending on the advisor’s recommendation. Reading proficiency must be certified through a written examination or an appropriate amount of coursework to be determined on a case-by-case basis. When deemed necessary by the student’s advisor(s), working knowledge of a third language may also be required.

Pass a comprehensive qualifying examination that tests the candidate’s breadth and depth in the primary field of research and methodological competence in the relevant discipline before advancing to Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR) status.

Students should submit a dissertation prospectus before advancing to Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR) status. The prospectus should comprehensively describe the dissertation project and include sections on the project rationale, key research questions, contributions to the field, a literature review, a chapter-by-chapter outline, a projected timeline, and a bibliography.

Pass the University Oral Examination (dissertation defense). General regulations governing the oral examination are found in Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures ( GAP 4.7.1 ). The candidate is examined on questions related to the dissertation after acceptable parts have been completed in draft form.

Following university policy ( GAP 4.8.1 ), submit a dissertation demonstrating the ability to undertake original research based on primary and secondary materials in Japanese.

Renaissances: Graduate Research Series: “Losing Perspective(s): Spatio-Temporal Disorientation in the Colonial Andes.”

phd literature stanford

  • Outlook.com
  • iCal / MS Outlook

Join us on Wednesday, January 17, at 11:30 a.m. in Pigott Hall (Bldg. 260), Room 216, as we host María Gloria Robalino (Comparative Literature, Stanford) and Professor Todd Olson (Department of History of Art, University of California, Berkeley) to discuss their research and works in progress.. 

María Gloria will present her article titled “Losing Perspective(s): Spatio-Temporal Disorientation in the Colonial Andes.” Professor Olson will offer a response and will present excerpts from his latest project. Following their remarks, Renaissances’ coordinators will moderate a Q&A and open the floor to discussion.  

To RSVP for the event and to receive copies of the texts under discussion, please click  HERE . Please note that RSVPs close Friday, January 12, at 5:00 p.m.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

MS Structural Engineering

Main navigation.

The Master of Science Program in Structural Engineering combines a group of required courses, selected from within each area of the program, with a broad range of electives, permitting each student to design a program focusing on aspects of particular interest.

Our goal is to make your time at Stanford as productive as possible. You are encouraged to use electives to build a program that fits your special strengths and interests.  As you choose electives, feel free to consult the course instructors and check the detailed course descriptions in the Stanford Bulletin.  Click here to download a checklist to help you verify that you meet these requirements.

The Master of Science degree is a 45-unit program devoted primarily to coursework. Students interested in participating in research projects may enroll for up to 6 units in CEE299.

Students have flexibility in selecting courses focusing on the area within the program which is of greatest interest to them. Diversity is encouraged.

In addition to the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department’s offerings, related coursework is also available from other departments such as Aerospace & Astronautics, Computer Science, Earth & Planetary Sciences, Earth Systems Science, Electrical Engineering, Geophysics, Mechanical Engineering, and Management Science and Engineering.

Undergraduate Prerequisites

The Structural Engineering and Mechanics Program is open to applicants with backgrounds in all areas of engineering and science. Certain basic subjects from the traditional areas of civil engineering are considered essential for a student who will receive the master’s degree in civil and environmental engineering, and are prerequisites for required courses in the program. These requirements are usually fulfilled by an ABET-accredited bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering, but if you lack any of the courses on the following list, you should anticipate including them in your graduate studies. Taking these courses may extend the amount of time required to complete the graduate degree. These courses must be taken for a letter grade, but prerequisites to these courses may be taken pass/no credit.

  • Mechanics of Materials (CEE101A)
  • Geotechnical Engineering (CEE101C)
  • Structural Analysis (CEE180)
  • Structural Design (CEE182)
  • Programming Methodology (CS106A or CS106X)

Degree Requirements

This is a complete list of requirements for completing the MS degree in Structural Engineering.

  • Forty-five total units of coursework relevant  to the profession of structural engineering must be completed.
  • Five  Structural Engineering Core Courses  must be completed.
  • Thirty units of coursework must be taken within the graduate-level Structural Engineering and Mechanics Program. Acceptable courses for these 30 units consist of any of the Structural Engineering Core Courses, as well as courses from the Breadth Electives Courses (courses offered for 3-4 units may count as 4 units towards this requirement, regardless of enrollment units, but p lease note that if enrolled for 3 units, only 3 units will count towards the minimum 45 unit requirement for degree conferral ).
  • At least 36 units must be completed within the School of Engineering.
  • All courses taken to fulfill the thirty units within the graduate-level Structural Engineering and Mechanics program (item 3), and at least 36 units of courses, must be taken for a letter grade. In addition, no more than 6 units may be taken CR/NC, subject to approval by your advisor.
  • The following exception to items 5 applies: there is no restriction on the number of units taken for CR/NC in Summer 2020, Autumn 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, and Summer 2021 that may be counted to satisfy the degree requirements.
  • No more than 10 units of undergraduate coursework may be counted toward the degree. As per University policy, all units for a graduate degree must be in courses at or above the 100-level.
  • No more than 6 units of the undergraduate prerequisites listed above may be counted toward the degree.
  • No more than a total of 6 units of combined Independent Study and CPT units may be counted toward the degree.
  • CEE 298, the Structural Engineering and Mechanics Seminar, must be completed
  • No more than 3 units of seminar courses may be counted toward the degree.
  • Your study list must be coordinated with and approved by your academic advisor.

Explore the Structural Engineering Program

  • Core Courses and Breath Electives
  • Suggested Courses

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Why Some Countries Want Companies to Think Inside the “Innovation Box”

IP-related tax breaks are meant to spur local investment and job creation. Do they?

January 16, 2024

phd literature stanford

A handful of countries provide a reduced tax rate for corporate income generated by the exploitation of intellectual property. | Cory Hall

To encourage innovation, some governments encourage companies to think inside the box. More exactly, they offer “innovation box” or “IP box” incentives that reduce taxes on innovation-related income.

“Countries really like innovative activity because it links so closely to economic growth,” says Rebecca Lester , an associate professor of accounting at Stanford Graduate School of Business and a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research . “There’s a wide range of ways in which policy and policymakers can encourage this type of behavior, and innovation box tax incentives are one of them.”

Governments hope these tax breaks will spur businesses to make more investments locally, boosting domestic economic growth. Yet to what extent do companies follow through on this? Lester set out to investigate whether companies receiving innovation box incentives step up their investments in fixed assets such as buildings or equipment. She also wondered about the tax incentives’ impact on employment and wages.

Along with Shannon Chen of the University of Arizona, Michelle Hanlon of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Lisa De Simone of the University of Texas at Austin, Lester found that multinational firms increase their on-the-ground investment only if innovation-related tax breaks are significant and require companies to have a physical presence or employees in-country to receive the benefit.

“In order for these regimes to really stimulate local activity, they have to be quite generous in the benefit that they give and they have to have really clear restrictions about a company’s presence in a country,” Lester says. The researchers also found that workers in innovation box countries are more highly compensated after their company receives the tax benefit.

Compete Globally, Invest Locally

In 2022, 21 countries had an innovation box policy that provided a reduced tax rate for corporate income generated by the exploitation of intellectual property. (Though the United States provides tax incentives for R&D, until the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 it did not have a tax policy that resembled an innovation box.) Lester and her colleagues looked at seven countries (Belgium, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, and the United Kingdom) that had innovation box tax policies in place prior to 2017, comparing them with other European countries without similar policies.

Quote Innovation box tax incentives are one of the few incentives countries can still use to retain and attract business activity across borders. Attribution Rebecca Lester

Lester and her colleagues found that capital investment was 2.6 percentage points higher in innovation box countries compared to non–innovation box countries after companies took their tax incentives. Across all countries, companies likely claiming the tax break spent on average 3.6 million to 4.4 million euros more on capital expenditures over the following three-year period versus businesses that were ineligible for the tax break.

Countries that offered especially large reductions in their domestic tax rate (between 70% and 90%) saw even heftier investments. So did those with strict policies that required a real economic presence in the country as a condition of claiming the benefit. On the other hand, Lester says, “In countries that have a less strict policy, firms can claim the incentive, but a lot of them are not really investing as much.”

At the same time, Lester and her fellow researchers found that firms that got tax incentives from their innovations did not end up adding more jobs. They did, however, pass on some of the savings in the form of higher wages for current employees. The researchers found that in the three years following a firm taking an innovation tax incentive, an average individual employee’s compensation rose by around 45,000 euros.

Drawing Borders Around Innovation

These findings have implications for policymakers in countries considering implementing an innovation box tax policy, as well as those who want to tweak existing tax rules to encourage more investment and growth.

To truly spur investment with this type of incentive, Lester says, countries must be prepared to offer a large tax benefit and restrict their policy to companies that agree to operate and invest locally. However, she cautions that this can be an expensive tax policy and requires careful and thorough analysis on the part of both governments and companies.

The tax is one tool countries continue to have at their disposal to compete across borders. Recently, the 38 member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development set a global minimum tax on large multinationals and passed other initiatives to reduce countries’ ability to compete on tax incentives. Currently, in Europe, countries that launch an innovation tax policy for the first time must require participating companies to have an in-country presence.

Lester says there are benefits and potential costs to stricter policies, such as a company choosing to move its investment across borders. Future research could look at how the stricter in-country presence requirements in Europe impact how much corporations choose to invest locally or fuel their decision to go elsewhere.

“Innovation box tax incentives are one of the few incentives countries can still use to retain and attract business activity across borders,” Lester says. “Our findings show policymakers some of the ways in which these types of policies can be more effective.”

For media inquiries, visit the Newsroom .

Editor’s Picks

phd literature stanford

The Effect of Innovation Box regimes on Income Shifting and Real Activity Shannon Chen Lisa De Simone Michelle Hanlon Rebecca Lester

December 08, 2022 Tax Avoidance Has Become a Key Part of IPO Planning Many soon-to-be public companies are already one step ahead of the tax collector.

September 28, 2022 How to Set Top Tax Rates Without Deterring Innovation The debate over taxing the highest earners overlooks the importance of encouraging new ideas, argues Charles Jones.

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University of Michigan Athletics

Michigan

Brooks Breaks All-Around Record as Wolverines Earn Decisive Win over Stanford

1/12/2024 10:00:00 PM | Women's Gymnastics

By: Megan McIntosh

» Sierra Brooks broke the all-around record with a 39.850. » Brooks earned two 9.975s and a perfect 10.0 on floor in the record-breaking performance. » The Wolverines swept the event titles with Carly Bauman winning the uneven bars.

Site: Ann Arbor, Mich. (Crisler Center) Score: No. 20 Michigan 197.725, Stanford 193.625 Records: U-M (1-3-0), Stanford (0-1-0) Next U-M Event: Sunday, Jan. 21 -- at Ohio State (Columbus, Ohio), 2 p.m. (TV: B1G+)

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- With a record-breaking performance from graduate student Sierra Brooks , the No. 20-ranked University of Michigan women's gymnastics team captured a decisive 197.725-193.625 victory over Stanford to open up its 2024 home season on Friday evening (Jan. 12) at Crisler Center.

Brooks broke the Michigan all-around record of 39.825 held by Natalie Wojcik, Elise Ray, Sarah Cain and Beth Wymer as she scored a 39.850 with her second perfect 10.0 on floor, a 9.975 on vault and beam and a 9.900 on uneven bars.

Brooks took home the event title in the all-around, vault, beam and floor, while Carly Bauman completed the Michigan event sweep with a 9.925 on uneven bars. As a team, U-M scored a 49.700 on the floor to rank second all-time as it saw career-highs from Bauman, Jenna Mulligan and Reyna Guggino -- who all posted matching 9.925s. Freshman Ava Jordan made her first collegiate performance for the Maize and Blue, posting a 9.850 in the leadoff spot on vault.

The Wolverines got out to a hot start on the vault as Jordan led off in her first career event with a 9.850 before Gabby Wilson posted a 9.900 in the five spot and Brooks ended the rotation with a first-place 9.975. The Wolverines had a large advantage after one rotation, leading Stanford 49.475-46.125.

Michigan earned three 9.800s on the uneven bars before Bauman took home the title with a 9.925 in the five spot and Brooks closed out the event with a 9.900. The Wolverines carried a 98.700-94.900 lead at the halfway point of the meet against the Cardinal.

U-M was steady on the beam as Mulligan led off with a career-best 9.825 and Bauman notched her second score of 9.900-or-higher of the evening with a 9.900 in the five spot. Brooks finished off the event with her second 9.975 of the day and the Wolverines went into the final rotation with a 148.025-144.200 lead over Stanford.

Michigan had its best event of the evening to close out the meet as Bauman, Mulligan, Guggino and Naomi Morrison earned four-straight 9.925s and Brooks followed with a perfect 10 to lead U-M to tie the second-best score in program history with a 49.700. The effort allowed the Wolverines to capture a 197.725-193.625 victory over Stanford.

U-M kicks off the 2024 Big Ten slate when it travels to Ohio State on Sunday (Jan. 21) for a conference contest at 2 p.m. on B1G+.

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    The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages recognizes that the Supreme Court issued a ruling in June 2023 about the consideration of certain types of demographic information as part of an admission review. All applications submitted during upcoming application cycles will be reviewed in conformance with that decision.

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    Welcome to the DLCL The Division brings together individuals dedicated to the study of literatures, cultures, and languages from humanistic and interdisciplinary perspectives. Mission statement The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages hosts five departments, as well as the Stanford Language Center. Comparative Literature

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  29. Brooks Breaks All-Around Record as Wolverines Earn Decisive Win over

    -- With a record-breaking performance from graduate student Sierra Brooks, the No. 20-ranked University of Michigan women's gymnastics team captured a decisive 197.725-193.625 victory over Stanford to open up its 2024 home season on Friday evening (Jan. 12) at Crisler Center.