How to Use the "4 C's" Rubrics

This excerpt appears in the Buck Institute for Education's book, "PBL for 21st Century Success: Teaching Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Communication, Creativity." Rubrics for each of the "4 C's" are in the book, and we offer guidance below on how to use them in a PBL context. They are also available to download on BIE's website at the following links:

  • Upper Elementary School Presentation Rubric
  • Middle School Presentation Rubric
  • High School Presentation Rubric

What these rubrics assess

These rubrics describe what good critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity & innovation look like in the context of Project Based Learning. The rubrics do not describe these competencies as they are seen generally or in other settings. For example, the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts call upon students to think critically when reading literature by making inferences and determining the author’s intent. But since the particular content of projects will vary, the Critical Thinking Rubric for PBL only describes aspects of critical thinking that apply to tasks found in all projects, such as evaluating the reliability of a source of information. The same is true for communication; instead of describing competency in all types of communication, such as writing or listening to a speaker, we have chosen to focus the rubric on making a presentation, a competency common to all projects.

student giving presentation in class. A thinking bubble is next to her and it says "I wonder how my presentation is going..."

What these rubrics do NOT assess: “content”

These rubrics are designed to assess only the 4 C’s, not subject-area knowledge in, say, math, history, or science. This content should be assessed with a separate rubric—or by adding rows to these rubrics. A “content + 4 C’s” rubric can be created by the teacher for the particular product in the project, and target particular content standards. For example, the Presentation Rubric for PBL includes criteria for how well a student organizes ideas, speaks, and uses presentation aids. However, the rubric does not mention specific terminology, concepts, or subject-area information that should be used in the presentation, as determined by the teacher. The same goes for critical thinking; the rubric does not assess subject area knowledge when teams in a biology class decide if the government should fund gene therapy research or teams in an English class investigate the relevance of Macbeth to modern society. In other words, the rubric is designed to assess critical thinking skills used in projects anchored in subject-area content, but that content should be assessed separately.

How these rubrics align with Common Core State Standards

Competency in critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity is required to meet many of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts and Literacy for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. he 4 C's are reflected in the "Mathematical Practices" section of CCSS, but not in the specific numbered standards, so they are not cited.

In these rubrics, note that:

  • Specific ELA standards are cited in the “At Standard” column only, but their intent is reflected in the “Approaching” and “Below” columns too.
  • Exact CCSS language is used when possible—which could be useful as a vocabulary-building opportunity for students— but occasionally we used more student-friendly terms.
  • The CCSS does not specifically address all of the 21st century competencies used in PBL, so some items appear on the rubrics without “CC” citations.

How to use these rubrics

The primary purpose of these rubrics is to help students reflect on their work and understand more clearly what they need to do to improve. Consider these tips for using the rubrics:

  • Teachers may use the rubric as a source of guiding ideas for creating their own rubric, or choose not to use certain rows, or adapt the language to fit the needs of their students and the design of the project.
  • Teachers should help students understand the rubric; give examples, explain new vocabulary words, put the language in their own words, and so on. Show models of the performance and have students practice using the rubric to assess them.
  • Give students the rubric near the beginning of a project. Have them assess themselves and reflect on their progress at checkpoints and at the end.
  • A student’s performance may be described by some items in one column and some in another.

How to find evidence of 21st century competencies

Sources of evidence for 21st century competencies may include journals or other writing in which students document their use of the competency, self- and peer-reflections, and teacher observations.  Another source of evidence is the product students create and/or their explanation of how it was created.  For example, when students share project work with an audience a teacher can, in addition to assessing their competency in making a presentation, ask them to explain how they used critical thinking or followed the process of innovation.

How these rubrics are organized

Two of the rubrics, Critical Thinking and the “Process” section of Creativity & Innovation, are organized by the four phases of a typical project. This is because different aspects of these competencies come into play at different times. The other two rubrics, for Collaboration and Presentation, do not follow the phases of a project. The Presentation Rubric is only used in the last phase of a project, when students share their work with a public audience. However, competency in collaboration is relevant to all phases of a project. For example, a student should complete tasks on time, build on others’ ideas, and show respect for teammates not just at the beginning of the project, but throughout it.

The columns along the top describe levels of quality: 

  • Below Standard : What students do when they have not yet shown evidence of the competency.
  • Approaching Standard :  What students do when they are showing some evidence of gaining the competency, but still have gaps or deficiencies.
  • At Standard : What students do when they show evidence of having gained the competency to an appropriate degree for their age and experience.
  • Above Standard : What students do when they go beyond what is expected to demonstrate competency. This column is left blank, with space for making a check mark. See the notes below on how to use this column.

How to use the “Above Standard” column

It’s hard to predict or describe what a student may do when performing “Above Standard” but it’s often the case that “you’ll know it when you see it.” For this reason, we’ve left this column blank. A teacher could wait until it happens, then describe it. For example, an advanced critical thinker might make an especially insightful analysis of a text or source of information. A student with advanced competency in collaboration might show leadership that brings out the talents and efforts of others on a team. A highly skilled presenter might use humor, emotion, stories, metaphors, or interactive features “like a pro.” A creative product might have a “wow factor” or be similar to what an adult professional might create.

A teacher could also involve students in co-constructing language for the “Above Standard” column. Have them analyze samples of work from previous projects or professional products, then describe what makes them “go beyond expectations.”

How to assign scores or grades

These rubrics do not feature a numerical scale—we leave it up to the teacher who uses them to decide how to assign scores or grades. Some dimensions may be given more or less weight. For example, on the Collaboration Rubric, “Helps the Team” might count for more than “Respects Others,” depending on a teacher’s goals.

Within each of the levels of quality described by the rubric, there could be variation, so a teacher may want to allow for a range of scores or points in each. For example, a very weak “Below Standard” performance could be scored a “1” and a “2” could indicate a somewhat weak performance. Similarly, a very advanced or “Above Standard” performance could be scored as a “6” with a “5” being “At Standard.”

Feel free to draw language from the rubrics to create your own scoring guides for use with students, teachers, adult mentors, or presentation audience members.

This short research brief summarizes evidence of the impact of Project Based Learning on student learning in core content areas. The driving question for this brief is based on the most common question that teachers, principals, school leaders, coaches, and grant writers ask us at the PBLWorks about Project Based Learning (PBL): What evidence exists that shows the impact of Project Based Learning on student learning in core content areas.

Citation: Kingston, S. (2018). Project Based Learning & Student Achievement: What Does the Research Tell Us? PBL Evidence Matters. 1(1), 1-11.

Source Organization: PBLWorks

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Speaking and listening and writing rubrics

These Common Core aligned rubric can be used to provide students feedback on their speaking and listening, and writing skills, as well as to help build persistence.

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This Common Core aligned rubric can be used to provide students feedback on their speaking and listening skills, as well as to help build persistence.

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This Common Core aligned rubric can be used to provide students feedback on their writing skills, as well as to help build persistence.

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CCSS Implementation Rubric and Self-Assessment Tool

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Achieve and Education First Release Common Core State Standards Tool to Assist States in Implementing the CCSS

The wide adoption of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) represents an unprecedented opportunity in public education across the country. For the first time in history states will share a common platform on which they can collaborate and compare achievement, and students from coast to coast will be held to standards designed to prepare them for the 21st century demands of college and careers.

But mere adoption of these new standards will be insufficient. Success in each state will hinge on implementation: the strategies used to improve instruction in every classroom, the tiered supports provided to all students, policy changes to promote coherence and alignment and a commitment to building and maintaining widespread understanding of and support for the new standards.

To assist states in gauging the strength of their implementation plans and to illustrate how to improve them, Education First and Achieve have partnered on the development of a new “ Common Core State Standards Implementation Rubric and Self-Assessment Tool .” This is no easy task, and will require states to assume a far stronger leadership role than most have in the past. This tool sets a high quality standard for a strong state role, provides some concrete details and examples to help state leaders get there and profiles some promising state approaches. Recognizing differences in state tradition, restrictions and authority for education as well as the central role of districts and other partners in implementation, the rubric identifies a strong state role that attends to three essential outcomes:

  • Accountability for results
  • Quality of services and products
  • Alignment of services and products with the expectations articulated in the CCSS.

Achieve was pleased to partner with Education First on the development of this important tool, which will be used by state teams during this week’s third PARCC Transition and Implementation Institute. As such, a handful of leading PARCC states that exemplify key features of strong plans were profiled. These vignettes together demonstrate how different approaches in the areas of teacher professional development (Kentucky, New Jersey and New Mexico) and curricular resources and instructional materials (Colorado, Florida and Indiana) can be effectively employed to support implementation.

The tool was designed to be useful for all states implementing the Common Core State Standards – whether they are members of PARCC, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium or both.

In addition, the tool is intended to complement a workbook that Achieve and the Education Delivery Institute (EDI) released, Implementing the Common Core State Standards: A Workbook for State and Local Leaders . The Achieve-EDI workbook is mainly about “the how” – what it takes to organize and manage the complex implementation plan required for success. This new tool focuses more directly on the “what.”

We hope many state leaders will find the Common Core State Standards Implementation Rubric and Self-Assessment Tool to be a helpful means for internal assessment and on-going efforts to strengthen their plans. For more information, please contact Alissa Peltzman at [email protected] or 202-419-1573.

Achieve is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit education reform organization dedicated to working with states to raise academic standards and graduation requirements, improve assessments, and strengthen accountability.

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Preparing for the Common Core: Using Rubrics to Guide Teachers and Students

By: Ross Brewer, Ph.D., Exemplars President

As you begin preparing your staff to focus on the Common Core this year, rubrics should play a key role in terms of helping your teachers and students achieve success with the new standards.

 What are rubrics?

A rubric is a guide used for assessing student work. It consists of criteria that describe what is being assessed as well as different levels of performance.

Rubrics do three things:

  • The criteria in a rubric tell us what is considered important enough to assess.
  • The levels of performance in a rubric allow us to determine work that meets the standard and that which does not.
  • The levels of performance in a rubric also allow us to distinguish between different levels of student achievement among the set criteria.

Why should teachers use them?

The Common Core assessment shifts posed challenges for many students. The use of rubrics allow teachers to more easily identify these areas and address them.

For Consistency.  Rubrics help teachers consistently assess students from problem to problem and with other teachers through a common lens. As a result, both teachers and students have a much better sense of where students stand with regard to meeting the standards.

 To Guide Instruction.  Because rubrics focus on different dimensions of performance, teachers gain important, more precise information about how they need to adjust their teaching and learning activities to close the gap between a student’s performance and meeting the standard.

To Guide Feedback.  Similarly, the criteria of the rubric guides teachers in the kind of feedback they offer students in order to help them improve performance. Here are four guiding questions that teachers can use as part of this process:

  • What do we know the student knows?
  • What are they ready to learn?
  • What do they need to practice?
  • What do they need to be retaught?

How do students benefit?

Rubrics provide students with important information about what is expected and what kind of work meets the standard. Rubrics allow students to self-assess as they work on and complete problems. Meeting the standard becomes a process in which students can understand where they have been, where they are now and where they need to go. A rubric is a guide for this journey rather than a blind walk through an assessment maze.

Important research shows that teaching students to be strong self-assessors and peer-assessors are among the most effective educational interventions that teachers can take. If students know what is expected and how to assess their effort as they complete their work, they will perform at much higher levels than students who do not have this knowledge. Similarly, if students assess one another’s work they learn from each other as they describe and discuss their solutions. Research indicates that lower performing students benefit the most from these strategies.

Rubrics to Support the Common Core.

Exemplars  assessment rubric  criteria reflect the  Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice  and parallel the  NCTM Process Standards . Exemplars rubric consists of four performance levels (Novice, Apprentice, Practitioner (meets standard) and Expert) and five assessment categories (Problem Solving, Reasoning and Proof, Communication, Connections and Representation).

To help teachers see the connection between our assessment rubric and the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice, we have developed two alignment documents:

  • Math Exemplars: A Perfect Complement for the Common Core   aligns each of the Standards of Mathematical Practice to the corresponding sections of the Exemplars assessment rubric.
  • Common Core Standards of Mathematical Practice and the Practitioner Level of the Exemplars Math Assessment Rubric  provides much more detail. It aligns the language within each Standard for Mathematical Practice to the Practitioner level of the Exemplars assessment rubric.

Which alignment one uses will depend on the intended purpose of the user.

It’s never too young to start.

Students can begin to self-assess in Kindergarten. At Exemplars, we encourage younger students to start by using a simple thumbs up, thumbs sideways, thumbs down assessment as seen in this video .

Our most popular student rubric is the  Exemplars Jigsaw Rubric . This rubric has visual and  verbal descriptions of each criterion in the Exemplars Standard Rubric along with the four levels of performance. Using this rubric, students are able to:

  • Self-monitor.
  • Self-correct.
  • Use feedback to guide their learning process.

How to introduce rubrics into the classroom.

In order for students to fully understand the rubric that is being used to assess their performance, they need to be introduced to the general concept first. Teachers often begin this process by developing rubrics with students that do not address a specific content area. Instead, they create rubrics around classroom management, playground behavior, homework, lunchroom behavior, following criteria with a substitute teacher, etc. For specific tips and examples,  click here .

After building a number of rubrics with students, a teacher can introduce the Exemplars assessment rubric. To do this effectively, we suggest that teachers discuss the various criteria and levels of performance with their class. Once this has been done,  a piece of student work can be put on an overhead. Then, using our assessment rubric, ask students to assess it. Let them discuss any difference in opinion so they may better understand each criterion and the four performance levels. Going through this process helps students develop a solid understanding of what an assessment guide is and allows them to focus on the set criteria and performance levels.

Deidre Greer, professor at Columbus State University, works with students at a Title I elementary school in Georgia. Greer states that in her experience,

The Exemplars tasks have proven to be engaging for our Title I students. Use of the student-scoring rubric helps students understand exactly what is expected of them as they solve problems. This knowledge then carries over to other mathematics tasks.

At Exemplars, we believe that rubrics are an effective tool for teachers and students alike. In order to be successful with the new learning expectations set forth by the Common Core, it is important for students to understand what is required of them and for teachers to be on the same “assessment” page. Rubrics can help.

To learn more about Exemplars rubrics and to view additional samples,  click here .

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Group presentation rubric

This is a grading rubric an instructor uses to assess students’ work on this type of assignment. It is a sample rubric that needs to be edited to reflect the specifics of a particular assignment. Students can self-assess using the rubric as a checklist before submitting their assignment.

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Fresh Start 2 Fitness- Anti Core Workout

by Intermountain Health

Whether you’re an athlete who goes to the gym every day, or someone just trying to get into a basic exercise routine, having a strong core and a stable spine will help you with everyday activities. Intermountain Utah Valley Hospital exercise physiologist John Gregory says this “Anti-Core” workout is about doing movements focused on resisting and doing motion the spine would typically perform. Gregory says to do these exercises a few times a week to help strengthen your core.

1) Dead bug (anti extension):

  • Start by laying on your back, bring your knees in toward your chest w/ about a 90-degree bend in them and feet off the ground.
  • Arms are going to be pointed straight up with palms facing one another.
  • From here, I want you to think of driving your ribcage down toward your belly button to fill that empty space between your low back and the floor.
  • You are going to be maintaining this brace you have created for the duration of the exercise.
  • From here, extend one leg out and the opposite arm back, bring them back to the starting position and switch to the other side.
  • Perform this exercise until you feel like you can no longer maintain the brace you have created anymore.
  • Do about 2-3 total sets.

2) Shoulder Taps (Anti Rotation):

  • Start in a push-up position or a modified one depending on your skill level.
  • From here, put tension into your abs and glutes.
  • This will help with pelvic stability during the exercise.
  • Then lift one hand off the floor and tap the opposite shoulder with it.
  • Place that hand back down and then perform the same motion with the other arm.
  • Perform about 5-10 reps per side for 2-3 sets.

3) Suitcase Hold (anti Lateral Flexion):

  • Start in a standing position.
  • Hold one moderately heavy dumbbell slightly off the body.
  • From here, brace your core, make a fist with the opposite hand and maintain a completely upright torso not letting the dumbbell pull you over towards the side it’s on.

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  1. PDF PRESENTATION RUBRIC for PBL: for grades 6-8; Common Core ELA aligned

    2. PRESENTATION RUBRIC for PBL: for grades 6-8; Common Core ELA aligned. Below Standard. Approaching Standard. At Standard. Above Standard. . Presentation Aids. does not use audio/visual aids or media • attempts to use one or a few audio/ visual aids or media but they distract from or do not add to the presentation.

  2. PDF 9-12 Presentation Rubric CCSS Aligned

    PRESENTATION RUBRIC for PBL: for grades 9-12; Common Core ELA aligned. 2. Below Standard. Approaching Standard. At Standard. Above Standard. . Presentation Aids. does not use audio/visual aids or media • attempts to use one or a few audio/ visual aids or media, but they do not add to or may distract from the presentation.

  3. Assessment and Rubrics

    This pages includes support materials for assessments that work with the Common Core State Standards and rubrics for many different assessment products. It also contains some information on the creation of rubrics and assessment in general. ... Presentation rubric: K-2; Presentation rubric: 3-5; Presentation rubric: 6-8; Presentation rubric: 9 ...

  4. PDF Reading K-3: Road to the Common Core Speaking & Listening (2)

    Reading K-3: Road to the Common Core Speaking & Listening (2) 1 Speaking & Listening (2) Sample Assessment Rubrics . Sample Assessment Rubrics for Oral Presentations . These rubrics can be used as -is or adapted as needed. The idea behind a rubric is to provide

  5. How to Use the "4 C's" Rubrics

    How these rubrics align with Common Core State Standards. Competency in critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity is required to meet many of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts and Literacy for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. he 4 C's are reflected in the "Mathematical ...

  6. PDF PRESENTATION RUBRIC for PBL

    PRESENTATION RUBRIC for PBL (for grades 3-5; Common Core ELA aligned) Below Standard Approaching Standard At Standard Above Standard Explanation of Ideas & Information f uses inappropriate facts and irrelevant details to support main ideas f chooses some facts and details that support main ideas, but there may not be enough, or some are irrelevant

  7. Oral Presentation Rubric

    The rubric allows teachers to assess students in several key areas of oral presentation. Students are scored on a scale of 1-4 in three major areas. The first area is Delivery, which includes eye contact, and voice inflection. The second area, Content/Organization, scores students based on their knowledge and understanding of the topic being ...

  8. PDF Oral Presentation Rubric

    Oral Presentation Rubric 4—Excellent 3—Good 2—Fair 1—Needs Improvement Delivery • Holds attention of entire audience with the use of direct eye contact, seldom looking at notes • Speaks with fluctuation in volume and inflection to maintain audience interest and emphasize key points • Consistent use of direct eye contact with ...

  9. Speaking and listening and writing rubrics

    Speaking and listening and writing rubrics. Grades 6 - 12 English Language Arts. These Common Core aligned rubric can be used to provide students feedback on their speaking and listening, and writing skills, as well as to help build persistence.

  10. iRubric: Common Core Team Presentation rubric

    Rubric possible points is 15. --->Built by helliott_3 using iRubric.com. Free rubric builder and assessment tools. iRubric: Common Core Team Presentation rubric - F7C384

  11. PDF 4.1 CCSS 4 Oral Presentation Rubric

    Presentation Strategies. audience by maintaining direct eye contact with all members Fluctuates volume and inflection to maintain audience interest and to emphasize key points Maintains eye contact with most members of the audience. Speech is audible, clear and at an understandable pace (SL.4.4) Some eye contact with some members of the audience.

  12. Common Core presentation rubric by Alexandra Haas

    Description. Presentations are a major component of common core. This rubric is designed to hold students accountable to the standards set by common core in presentation skills and collaboration.This rubric is tailored for science, but can be adjusted and used for any subject and grade level. Total Pages. 1 page.

  13. Oral Presentation Rubric Aligned to Common Core Standards ...

    Want a quick and easy Presentation Rubric that is aligned to the 9-12 Common Core Standards for Speaking and Listening? Then look no further!I have found that this rubric works great for any presentation: oral presentations, group presentations, poster presentations, or PowerPoint presentations. I...

  14. CCSS Implementation Rubric and Self-Assessment Tool

    We hope many state leaders will find the Common Core State Standards Implementation Rubric and Self-Assessment Tool to be a helpful means for internal assessment and on-going efforts to strengthen their plans. For more information, please contact Alissa Peltzman at [email protected] or 202-419-1573. Achieve and Education First Release ...

  15. Student Presentation Rubric

    This is a Common-Core aligned rubric for any individual or group in-class presentation on any topic. The rubric includes four columns of assessment criteria: Multimedia, Supporting Evidence, Organization, and Presentation Skills. This download includes a printable PDF file of the rubric as well as a link to an editable Google Doc file.

  16. Preparing for the Common Core: Using Rubrics to Guide ...

    Rubrics help teachers consistently assess students from problem to problem and with other teachers through a common lens. As a result, both teachers and students have a much better sense of where students stand with regard to meeting the standards. To Guide Instruction. Because rubrics focus on different dimensions of performance, teachers gain ...

  17. Group presentation rubric

    Group presentation rubric. This is a grading rubric an instructor uses to assess students' work on this type of assignment. It is a sample rubric that needs to be edited to reflect the specifics of a particular assignment. Students can self-assess using the rubric as a checklist before submitting their assignment. Download this file. Page.

  18. PDF ERUSD

    CA Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Alignment CPL 12.10.2012Adapted from Elk Grove Unified School District NOTES: In the left criterion boxes of the rubric, the CCSS-aligned standards have been identified. As a resource for teachers, below are the standards for the current grade (4th) as well as the preceding and subsequent grade.

  19. Common Core Presentation Rubric by CreativeClassroomCo

    Description. This rubric is designed for high school students to assess one another during presentations and for the teacher to assess during presentations as well. I created and used this tool in my science classroom, but it can be used for any subject. The rubric is common core aligned. This rubric is a similar rubric to the Presentation ...

  20. PDF Oral Presentation Rubric

    Adequate. Summarizes presentation's main points, and draws conclusions based upon these points. Goes beyond "average" in delivering a conclusion that is very well documented and persuasive. Voice quality and pace Demonstrates one or more of the following: mumbling, hard to understand English, too soft, too loud, too fast, too slow.

  21. Presentation Rubric

    Set expectations and provide feedback to your students using our Presentation Rubric. Perfect for busy upper-grade teachers, this handy resource will help you assess your students' oral presentations fairly and accurately. The rubric, which focuses on four main criteria, is super versatile and can be used to grade a wide range of topics and skill levels. For more help with grading, try our ...

  22. Google Slides™ EDITABLE Oral Presentation Rubric for Middle School

    EDITABLE Oral Presentation Rubric Print & Google Slides™ BUNDLE Middle School. Even if you have to do oral presentations over video call on Google Meet™ or Zoom™, the Common Core asks teachers to assess students' abilities with speaking and listening, including giving in-class presentations. When you incorporate public speaking into your ...

  23. Fresh Start 2 Fitness- Anti Core Workout

    Story, non-I.S. - News3 v1.0.0 (common) ... Fallback Presentation. Using deprecated PresentationRouter. News. Weather. Radar. ... From here, brace your core, make a fist with the opposite hand and ...

  24. Presentation Rubric Editable Teaching Resources

    This is a Common-Core aligned rubric for any individual or group in-class presentation on any topic. The rubric includes four columns of assessment criteria: Multimedia, Supporting Evidence, Organization, and Presentation Skills.This download includes a printable PDF file of the rubric as well as a link to an editable Google Doc file.