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UCLA Graduate Programs

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Whether you’re a new grad student, a postdoc, a visiting graduate researcher, or a prospective applicant looking to see what research we’re doing on campus, we’ve compiled some resources on this page to get you started.

As a preeminent public research university, UCLA offers the opportunity to lead research in state-of-the-art facilities while collaborating with world-renowned faculty. Scholars will learn to further shape and define their particular projects, expand their mastery in their chosen field, work in partnership with their peers and mentors and share their knowledge in the classroom and lab. This collective effort is the spark that ignites solutions to the most pressing global problems of today and tomorrow. Susan L. Ettner Dean, UCLA Division of Graduate Education Professor, Department of Medicine Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management

Visiting Graduate Researchers

Visiting Graduate Researchers are domestic or international degree-seeking graduate students at their home institution who are invited to conduct short-term doctoral research or participate in a mentored or independent research project or master’s research collaboration with a faculty member at UCLA. The initial Visiting Graduate Researcher appointment can range from 3 weeks to 12 months; the maximum stay is 24 months.

Postdoctoral Scholars

A  Postdoctoral Scholar  (Postdoc) is an individual who holds a doctoral degree, is engaged in advanced training and education, and conducts research under the guidance of a faculty member at UCLA. A postdoctoral scholar position prepares you for a career in academia, industry, government or the non-profit sector. Each year, UCLA hosts approximately 1,200 postdocs worldwide who play a critical role in furthering the University’s educational and research mission.

Research Assistantships

Graduate Student Researcher positions provide experience working on faculty-supervised research projects. Applicants should inquire within their department.

Internships

The UCLA Career Center’s  Handshake  is a good place to start looking for internships, as is the  UCLA International Education Office  if you’re looking for an experience abroad. Other places are your home program/department and other programs/departments on campus.

Summer Programs

Many UCLA summer programs are designed to give undergraduates research experience before applying to graduate school. Head to our Admissions section to learn more about Undergraduate Summer Programs . For graduate students, search our Graduate Funding Search Engine to see current research opportunities available through the summer.

  • UCLA-Peking Joint Research Institute Summer Exchange

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Funding for Graduate Students

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From research experiences across the world to internships at its headquarters, the U.S. National Science Foundation offers graduate students and recent Ph.D.s paid opportunities to expand their skills and knowledge in science and engineering.

On this page

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Information for principal investigators

This page highlights opportunities that graduate students and recent Ph.D.s can directly apply to.

If you're interested in supporting graduate students with NSF funding, explore NSF's  Funding Search  page. Most of NSF's funding opportunities allow proposers to include graduate student researchers in their project budget.

Some NSF opportunities focus explicitly on supporting graduate student training through  internships  and other activities, like NSF's  Non-Academic Research Internships for Graduate Students (INTERN) program.

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)

2015 GRFP awardee Lekeah A. Durden, a Ph.D. student.

The prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program  supports outstanding graduate students who are pursuing research-based master's or doctoral degrees in STEM — science, technology, engineering and mathematics — or in STEM education.

The five-year fellowship provides three years of financial support that can be used at accredited U.S. institutions. This support includes an annual stipend and a cost-of-education allowance covering tuition and fees.

Eligibility

Applicants must be citizens, nationals or permanent residents of the United States. Applicants must be pursuing full-time research-based master's and doctoral degrees in STEM or in STEM education at accredited U.S. institutions.

How to apply

Applications are due in the fall of each year. Learn more about the program and how to apply at  nsfgrfp.org .

And read NSF 101 for some tips on how to apply .

International Research Experiences for Students (IRES)

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NSF's IRES program offers international research opportunities to undergraduate and graduate students.

Participants are mentored by researchers at a foreign lab, allowing them to build their professional network. IRES opportunities usually involve small groups of students who travel to a host institution for a summer-length research project.

Undergraduate or graduate students who are citizens, nationals or permanent residents of the United States are eligible to apply.

Students must contact researchers with IRES funding for information and application materials. Application materials for different IRES opportunities can vary: they may require a statement of purpose, transcripts, reference letters or additional materials.

To find active IRES projects, visit the  NSF IRES Project Search . Each project lists the name and contact information of the principal investigator, or lead, of that project.

You can also find many (but not all) IRES opportunities on the  NSF Education and Training Application  website, where you can prepare and submit applications for IRES and other NSF education and training opportunities.

Computer and Information Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowships (CSGrad4US)

Rice University graduate student Wendy Hu

The CSGrad4US program helps bachelor's degree holders return to academia and pursue their research interests in computer and information science and engineering fields.

The three-year fellowship includes a stipend and cost-of-education allowance. 

Applicants must be citizens, nationals or permanent residents of the United States who are not currently enrolled in any degree-granting program and have never enrolled in a doctoral program. Applicants must intend to apply for full-time enrollment in a research-based doctoral degree program in a computer and information science and engineering field within two years.

Applications are typically due in the spring or early summer of each year. Learn more about the program and how to apply on the CISE Graduate Fellowships page.

Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants (DDRIG)

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Some of NSF's programs offer grants to doctoral students, allowing them to undertake significant data-gathering projects and conduct field research in settings away from their campus.

The award amounts of these grants vary across programs but typically fall between $15,000 to $40,000 (excluding indirect costs).

Doctoral students enrolled in U.S. institutions of higher education who are conducting scientific research are eligible to apply. Applicants do not need to be U.S. citizens.

These proposals are submitted to NSF through regular organizational channels by the doctoral student's dissertation advisor, with the student serving as the co-principal investigator on the proposal.

Visit NSF's  Funding Search  to see the list of programs that currently accept DDRIG proposals. Deadlines vary by program: some accept proposals at any time while others have annual or semi-annual deadlines.

Note: Information on the NSF-funded Law and Science Dissertation Grant (LSDG) can be found on the LSDG website .

NSF Research Traineeship Program (NRT)

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The NSF Research Traineeship Program gives graduate students opportunities to develop the skills and knowledge needed to pursue a range of STEM careers.

Graduate students funded by the program receive, at minimum, 12-month-long stipends that support their participation in the program's training activities, which can include courses, workshops and research projects.

Graduate students who are citizens, nationals and permanent residents of the United States are eligible to participate as funded trainees in the NRT program. International students can participate as unfunded trainees. Participants must be enrolled in research-based master's or doctoral degree programs.

Students must contact researchers with NRT funding for information and application materials.

To find active NRT projects, visit the  NSF NRT Project Search . Each project lists the name and contact information of the Principal Investigator, or lead, of that project.

For more information about the NSF Research Traineeship Program, please contact  [email protected] .

Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship

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NSF's Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship program supports summer research internships for doctoral students in the mathematical sciences. These internships are primarily at national laboratories and focus on introducing students to applications of mathematical or statistical theories outside of academia.

Current graduate students pursuing doctoral degrees in mathematics, statistics or applied mathematics are eligible to apply. Participants do not need to be U.S. citizens.

Applications are due in the fall or winter each year. Learn more about the program and how to apply on the internship website .

Presidential Management Fellowship Program

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The Presidential Management Fellows Program is a two-year paid fellowship designed to prepare current or recent graduate students for a career in the analysis and management of public policies and programs. At NSF, fellows serve as program and management analysts and a variety of other positions requiring a scientific degree.

Current or recent graduate students are eligible to apply.

Applications are due in the fall of each year. Learn more about the program and how to apply at  pmf.gov .

Summer Scholars Internship Program

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NSF's Summer Scholars Internship Program is a 10-week-long summer internship for undergraduate and graduate students. Students participating in the program work in NSF offices that align with their academic interests.

Through the program, interns learn about science administration and how federal policies affect the science and engineering community.

Graduate students and undergraduates who are citizens, nationals or permanent residents of the United States are eligible to apply.

Students interested in the NSF Summer Scholars Internship Program can apply through the following organizations:

  • QEM Network
  • Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities National Internship Program

For more information on the NSF Summer Scholars Internship Program, please contact  [email protected] .

Applying for a postdoc?

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NSF's Postdoctoral Research Fellowships support independent postdoctoral research, allowing fellows to perform work that will broaden their perspectives, facilitate interdisciplinary interactions, and help establish them in leadership positions.

These two- or three-year fellowships provide a stipend and a research and training allowance.

Citizens, nationals and permanent residents of the United States who have recently earned a Ph.D. or will have earned their Ph.D. before beginning the fellowship are eligible to apply.

Current postdoctoral fellowship opportunities can be found on NSF's  Funding Search .

Deadlines vary by program: some accept proposals at any time while others have annual deadlines.

Graduate Student Research

As a graduate student at Iowa State University, you’ll play a pivotal role in our research mission, contributing to the creation of new knowledge and making a positive impact on the world. Collaborate with world-class faculty and utilize cutting-edge facilities to make groundbreaking discoveries.

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At Iowa State, innovation knows no bounds. With over 100 graduate programs spanning a wide range of fields, you’ll discover a world of possibilities for your academic journey.

Explore our program offerings, and once you find your ideal program, you can connect with faculty who share your research interests.

Graduate programs

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Graduate Research

Graduate research at Syracuse University spans a wide range of disciplines, providing advanced students with the opportunity to engage in in-depth, cutting-edge research projects that advance their careers, knowledge and respective fields.

Exploring Where Curiosity, Creativity and Purpose Lead

Syracuse University research is both deep and specialized, allowing students to work closely with faculty mentors to tackle complex and pressing research questions. This hands-on research experience equips graduate students with the skills and expertise needed to make significant contributions to their chosen fields, while also fostering innovation and driving advancements across academic contexts. Our commitment to graduate research creates a vibrant and engaging environment where scholars can explore new frontiers and make an immediate and enduring impact.

Stats and Facts

We’re combining what we know from the decades of research I’ve been involved in around mindfulness-based practices with veterans and other challenged populations and applying that to what we know about the neurophysiology of stress and addiction craving to establish more effective and sustainable recovery.

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Graduate Research Opportunities

Graduate research opportunities allow students to dive deeply and take part in groundbreaking research projects across a wide range of disciplines.

Areas of Distinctive Research

From the sciences and humanities to business and public affairs, we focus on key areas of research that touch several disciplines to advance insight, innovation and impact further.

Emerging Technologies

From AI to quantum computing, Syracuse University researchers advance innovative technologies and game-changing research that moves the world forward.

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Human Thriving

With a research focus on human thriving, we value and seek to enable the contributions of people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds and to understand the physical and social conditions needed to create and support healthy and sustainable communities for everyone.

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With a commitment to inclusivity and diversity, we expand our research impact and outreach from Central New York to communities around the world, emphasizing active engagement with global organizations, education and citizenship.

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Experiential Inquiry

Integrating experiential learning across the liberal arts curriculum, nine professional schools and a diverse range of disciplines, Syracuse University equips students and faculty with immersive opportunities that can expand perspectives and extend impact.

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Engaged Citizenship

Through extensive leadership development and training opportunities, we are shaping the way the world educates and engages global citizens.

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  • Summer Research Programs

Harvard offers many ways to participate in research during the summer.

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Summer Research Opportunities at Harvard (SROH)

Harvard Griffin GSAS administers the Summer Research Opportunities at Harvard (SROH) program, but you may be interested in other programs at Harvard's many schools and affiliated hospitals.

Other Summer Programs

Harvard programs, harvard-amgen scholars program.

Harvard-Amgen Scholars will conduct novel biotechnology-focused research with Harvard scientists over the course of a 10-week summer internship. Interns will have the opportunity to interact closely with faculty through scholarly and pre-professional development activities including a Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series and Biotechnology Journal Club. They will also gain critical exposure to tools for effective science communication, proposal writing, and graduate school preparation, and will have opportunities to explore the Boston area through a variety of social activities and outings. Currently, enrolled undergraduates interested in pursuing a bioscience PhD or the MD/PhD are eligible to apply, especially those from underrepresented and diverse backgrounds. US citizenship or permanent residency is required. Housing on Harvard’s Cambridge campus, travel, meal allowance, and a stipend are provided. 

Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) Internship Program (HIP)

The Harvard Stem Cell Institute Internship Program (HIP) provides an opportunity for Harvard and non-Harvard undergraduates to gain direct experience in stem cell research while working in a Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) laboratory under the supervision of an experienced researcher. Interns participate in a mandatory stem cell seminar series and a career pathways presentation and present their summer research findings at the HIP Symposium in August. Candidates must express a strong interest in stem cell biology; previous lab experience is desirable but not required. Approximately 35 students are selected by competitive review for this 10-week internship. A stipend is provided.

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) is a 10-week program that introduces undergraduates to bioengineering, materials research, nanoscience, and engineering while providing a coordinated, educational, and dynamic research community that inspires them to seek a graduate degree. REU research opportunities are arranged in conjunction with the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC), the Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS), the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering , as well as other Harvard-based engineering and science entities. Professional development workshops, faculty seminars on research and ethics, and community activities are integrated into the program. Students receive a stipend and housing.

Center for Astrophysics Solar Research Experience for Undergraduates Program

Scientists from the Solar and Stellar X-Ray Group (SSXG) and the Solar, Stellar, and Planetary Group (SSP) at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) host undergraduate students from around the US. For 10 weeks, these students will participate in cutting-edge astronomical research about the sun and the heliosphere and learn the skills necessary for a successful scientific career. Projects range from data analysis to computer modeling to instrument building. Special seminars will be held to increase students' public speaking and computer programming skills. Students will learn from experience about scientific research and how to apply their academic work to real-world problems. Some time will also be devoted to exploring Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the surrounding area. US citizenship or permanent residency is required.  Stipend, housing, and travel are provided. Please visit the website for more information .

Harvard Forest Summer Research Program in Ecology

The Harvard Forest Summer Research Program in Ecology is an 11-week research program that allows students to participate in ongoing research at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts. Projects focus on the effects of natural and human disturbances on forest ecosystems including global warming, hurricanes, forest harvesting, and invasive organisms. Researchers come from many disciplines, and specific studies center on population and community ecology, paleoecology, land-use history, phenology, biogeochemistry, soil science, ecophysiology, and atmosphere-biosphere exchanges. Students work with mentors from Harvard and collaborating institutions. Responsibilities may include field sampling, laboratory studies, data analysis, and scientific writing. In addition, students attend seminars given by nationally known scientists and workshops on career and graduate school preparation. At the end of the summer, students present their research results by writing an abstract and presenting their findings at a student research symposium. The program provides room, board, and a competitive stipend.

Program for Research in Markets & Organizations

The Program for Research in Markets & Organizations (PRIMO) provides an opportunity for Harvard and non-Harvard undergraduates (rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors enrolled full-time at a US institution) to work closely with Harvard Business School faculty, gaining exposure to business research on a variety of cutting-edge ideas. The primary goal of the program is to build and foster a strong community of scholars committed to excellence in research as part of the Harvard Summer Undergraduate Research Village. Students must commit to the 10-week program and are provided with Harvard campus housing, meals, and a research stipend.

Programs at Harvard Medical School 

Summer honors undergraduate research program at harvard medical school.

Summer Honors Undergraduate Research Program (SHURP) is a 10-week summer research program primarily for college students belonging to groups that are underrepresented in the sciences. In addition to laboratory-based research with Harvard Medical School faculty, the program includes research and career development seminars and a peer-mentoring program. Stipend, housing, and travel are provided. Administered by the Division of Medical Sciences (PhD programs office) at Harvard Medical School every year since 1991, SHURP is offered for currently enrolled undergraduates who are considering careers in biological or biomedical research sciences, who have already had at least one summer (or equivalent term-time) of experience in a research laboratory, and who have taken at least one upper-level biology course that includes molecular biology. US citizenship or permanent residency is required.

Systems Biology Summer Internship Program

The 10-week Systems Biology Summer Internship Program enables interns to work on research projects spanning many scientific fields including systems biology, biophysics, bioinformatics, genomics, applied mathematics, and computation. Participants learn a range of cutting-edge techniques in the exciting and dynamic research environment of the FAS Center for Systems Biology and the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School. Participants must be US citizens or permanent residents. Individuals from underrepresented minority and economically disadvantaged groups are especially encouraged to apply.

Cell Biology Research Scholars Program

The Cell Biology Research Scholars Program provides a 10-week full-time research opportunity to undergraduate students with a passion for scientific discovery and fundamental biology. Students will be hosted by faculty investigators to work on cutting-edge research projects and participate in training workshops and mentoring activities in preparation for a productive scientific research career. A stipend is provided, but scholars are responsible for travel, housing, and meals.

Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Summer Scholars Program

The Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (BCMP) Summer Scholars Program is a 10-week program designed to provide hands-on laboratory research experience to motivated undergraduates with a strong interest in pursuing graduate studies focused on molecular mechanisms in biology. The program offers students the opportunity to gain experience in hands-on laboratory research; to interact with faculty, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and other summer interns; to attend weekly presentations by department members on specific research projects and cutting-edge research tools; and to improve their presentation, writing, and communication skills. Participating laboratories cover a broad range of basic and disease-oriented research topics using the analytical tools of biochemistry, molecular genetics, biophysics, chemical biology, and structural biology. A stipend is provided, but students are responsible for travel, housing, and meal accommodations.

Summer Undergraduate Program in Immunology at Harvard Medical School

The 10-week Summer Undergraduate Program in Immunology exposes undergraduate students to current topics in immunology. Students participate in a combination of weekly lectures and laboratory work with faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows from the Harvard Medical School Immunology Graduate Program. Participants from colleges in which the topic is not taught or presented in depth are especially welcome, and individuals from underrepresented minority groups are especially encouraged to apply. Preference will be given to students who are in their sophomore or junior year. A stipend is provided, but the program is unable to assist with travel, housing arrangements, or visas for students.

Summer Institute in Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School

Summer Institute in Biomedical Informatics , now entering its 15th year, is a nine-week full-time extensive research opportunity with a curriculum including didactic lectures, clinical case studies, a mentored research project, and presentation of findings. The program is for undergraduates with quantitative interests and skills who aspire to contribute to translational advances in biomedicine with a future PhD or research-oriented MD or MD/PhD. A stipend, housing, and a travel allowance are provided. If you are an undergraduate with a strong quantitative background and interested in innovation and methodological rigor in your approach to scientific inquiry in biomedicine or in the translation of computational methods to engineering/software applications in medicine, this is the summer program for you!

The Four Directions Summer Research Program

The Four Directions Summer Research Program (FDSRP) provides an opportunity for talented Native American undergraduates to explore careers in the medical profession under the guidance and supervision of staff from Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. The FDSRP is an eight-week summer research opportunity offered to undergraduate and first-year medical students with a commitment to the health of Native American communities. Interns engage in basic science or translational research projects under the supervision of Harvard Medical School faculty advisors. Students also receive career development training, meet faculty from across the hospital and medical school, and participate in a variety of social networking events. US citizenship or permanent residency is required. Stipend, housing, and travel are provided.

Newborn Medicine Summer Student Research Program

The Newborn Medicine Summer Student Research Program is sponsored by the Harvard Program in Neonatology for students interested in clinical aspects and research in Newborn Medicine. During the 8–12-week program, students are guided by faculty and fellow mentors from the program with the goal of providing undergraduate and medical school students with intensive clinical and laboratory research. As part of the program, the students will have the opportunity to observe newborn care in the hospital nurseries, clinics, and neonatal intensive care units. Partial funding is available for students participating in the program.

Harvard Summer Research Program in Kidney Medicine

Based at Harvard Medical School, the Harvard Summer Research Program in Kidney Medicine is an eight-week research-intensive experience that provides undergraduates interested in science or medicine an introduction to nephrology, and an overview of basic and clinical science. At the end of the program, students will have the opportunity to present their research at a national student symposium. Stipend and housing are provided. Research experience is preferred but not required. US citizenship or permanent residency is required.

Programs at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Summer program in biological sciences in public health.

The Summer Program in Biological Sciences in Public Health at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health is an eight-week laboratory-based biological research program for undergraduates belonging to underrepresented groups during the summer following their sophomore or junior years. The program exposes college students to the rewards of laboratory research directed toward solving important public health problems such as infections (malaria, TB, parasites), cancer, lung diseases, multifactorial, multigenic, and common diseases of aging, diabetes, and obesity. Scientific approaches include regulation of cell growth and gene regulation, cellular metabolism, DNA modification, cellular signaling, and structure-function analyses. The overall mission of the program is to prepare qualified students for graduate-level training leading to research careers in the biological sciences.

Summer Program in Epidemiology

The Summer Program in Epidemiology at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health is an intensive five-week program that integrates mathematics and quantitative methods to provide students with an understanding of the skills and processes necessary to pursue a career in public health. The program recruits undergraduates belonging to underrepresented groups for graduate-level training. Areas of study include cancer prevention, infectious disease, environmental and occupational health, nutrition, and more. Students will participate in an introductory course in epidemiology and biostatistics, faculty lectures, a research project led by faculty or post-doctoral fellow, and networking opportunities. Travel, lodging, a stipend, and frequent meals are provided.

Multidisciplinary International Research Training (MIRT) Program

MIRT is a national program designed to encourage students to pursue careers in biomedical and behavioral research providing support for undergraduate and graduate students to do health-related population-based research and training in developing countries including Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, Vietnam, Thailand, Republic of Georgia, Peru, Mexico, Ecuador, Chile, and Australia. Trainees get knowledge of scientific literature associated with projects, biomedical research ethics, and cultural aspects with a focus on how these aspects affect public health issues as well as scientific and medical issues. Research opportunities are designed collaboratively with faculty in these institutions to address health and health disparities pertinent to their countries.

Summer Program in Biostatistics & Computational Biology at the Harvard School of Public Health

The Summer Program in Biostatistics & Computational Biology is an intensive six-week introduction to biostatistics, epidemiology, and public health research. Based at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, this program is designed to introduce qualified undergraduates and post-baccalaureates to the use of quantitative methods for biological, environmental, and medical research, and to demonstrate the application of quantitative methods to the study of human health. US citizenship or permanent residency is required.

Programs at Harvard’s Affiliated Hospitals

Summer research trainee program at massachusetts general hospital .

The goal of the eight-week Summer Research Trainee Program (SRTP) is to provide underrepresented minority students with an overview of opportunities available in biomedical research and clinical medicine. Students are assigned to Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) laboratories or clinical sites where they undertake original research projects and prepare presentations of their work under the mentorship of an MGH investigator. In addition to this research experience, students will attend weekly seminars, career development workshops, and networking events. The program is open to underrepresented minority students who have completed at least three years of college or who are first-year medical students; no prior research experience is necessary. US citizenship or permanent residency is required. Housing, meals, and a stipend are provided.

Summer Training in Academic Research and Scholarship Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital

The STARS Program provides underrepresented minority (URM) undergraduate and first-year medical students with a strong interest in pursuing advanced careers as research scientists, physicians, and/or healthcare professionals with an opportunity to engage in basic, clinical, and translational research projects during an eight-week summer program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS). Interns participate in a research project under the supervision of an HMS faculty mentor. Additional activities include "Research 101" education and training sessions, social networking opportunities, weekly roundtables with BWH Faculty and the Office for Multicultural Faculty Careers, and community health center/clinic shadowing. US citizenship or permanent residency is required. Housing, travel, and a stipend are provided.

Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences at Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center

The Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC) Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE) program introduces Massachusetts high school and undergraduate students from underrepresented minority populations to cancer research. Each year, CURE selects several students to participate in full-time 8–12-week summer internships. Interns are assigned individual mentors, who oversee their research and offer guidance. In addition to working on a research project, participants benefit from various program activities, such as a comprehensive orientation, scientific research, and professional development seminars, journal club discussions, networking, and social events. Applicants must demonstrate an interest in pursuing a biomedical or health-related research career. Students receive a weekly stipend.

Brigham Research Institute Undergraduate Research Summer Internship Program 

The Brigham Research Institute’s Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program provides an excellent opportunity for undergraduates across the United States to gain a focused, challenging, and hands-on research experience in a basic science or clinical laboratory setting. Interns can choose from a wide variety of host labs doing exciting work in areas related to cardiovascular, immunology, musculoskeletal, neurobiology, and sex differences research. During the 10-week internship program, students can take advantage of educational and professional development offerings on the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School campuses as well as participate in a central curriculum associated with the program. Students will present their research findings in a mini research symposium at the end of their training period.

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Research, Creative Activities & Innovation > Student Research > Graduate Student Research

​​Elevating academic excellence and embracing a culture of creativity and discovery is a key strategic pillar for the University; our graduate students experience this every day. Our colleges and departments have outstanding research facilities and opportunities for conducting graduate-level research. Masters students can engage in the research process through independent studies, thesis-based courses, and interning with faculty as a research assistant. Doctoral students (in specific departments) undergo a rigorous research curriculum to help them excel at both teaching and research.

Doctoral Programs

Driehaus college of business & kellstadt graduate school of business.

Doctorate in Business Administration DePaul's DBA program begins with a strong emphasis on research methodology and disciplinary coursework that features the most current developments from both academia and professional practice. Coursework simultaneously builds candidates' interdisciplinary business knowledge and applied research skills. Candidates take seven research methodology and seven business discipline specific courses.

Jarvis College of Computing and Digital Media

Computer and Information Sciences (PhD) The PhD program in Computer and Information Sciences offers an opportunity for exceptional students to pursue substantial research in the computer sciences and related areas. The program is highly selective and is purposefully kept small so that each PhD student can receive substantial advising and mentoring from CDM faculty. To earn a PhD degree, a student must demonstrate breadth of knowledge in at least two research areas and significant depth in a chosen dissertation area. In addition, the student must conceive, write and defend a PhD dissertation representing a significant and original contribution to current academic research as demonstrated by a public dissertation defense and publication in established peer-reviewed academic conferences and/or journals.

College of Education

Curriculum Studies (PhD) The Curriculum Studies (PhD) program prepares you to strengthen your own practice, challenging you to work for social justice and educational excellence. The program focuses on educational curriculum in the context of sociocultural and political environments, forcing you to think critically about opportunities and problems in education. The PhD in Curriculum Studies is for those who seek academic careers such as researchers or university faculty; leadership positions in educational policy, local or state agencies; or curriculum positions in schools or community learning environments.

Educational Leadership (EdD) The Educational Leadership (EdD) program examines the human, organizational, political, social and technical systems of educational institutions. As a Doctor of Education (EdD) you will be committed to socially just leadership and the transformation of education at the local, regional and national levels.

College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

Philosophy (PhD) In the Philosophy (PhD) program, you’ll gain a foundational understanding of the discipline, grounded in continental European thought, through rigorous coursework and seminars. Through directed research, colloquia and the dissertation, you’ll also develop the expertise necessary to begin your academic career. In addition to your studies within the department, you’ll spend the spring of your second year abroad, engaged in immersive language study.

College of Science and Health

Clinical Psychology (MA/PhD) DePaul’s Clinical Psychology (MA/PhD) program emphasizes training in both scientific research and practice and has been recognized by the APA for training in diversity. You’ll gain a deep understanding of the societal and systemic forces that influence mental health and contribute to disparities in access to adequate health care for poor, urban and ethnically diverse populations. You’ll be prepared to work in the public sector, in an urban environment, with diverse ethnic and socio-economic populations, and with children, teens and families who have been traditionally underserved by psychology.

Community Psychology (MA/PhD) Find solutions to a wide array of social issues, from educational failure and chronic illness to substance abuse and violence. DePaul’s Community Psychology (MA/PhD) program will equip you with the skills and research methodologies necessary for a career as a researcher, educator, interventional specialist, consultant and program evaluator. The program emphasizes human diversity, specializing in research and intervention work with underserved communities.

Industrial/Organizational Psychology (MA/PhD) DePaul’s Industrial/Organizational Psychology (MA/PhD) program will provide you with a solid grounding in psychological theory and essential training in methodology. As an Industrial/Organizational (I-O) Psychology graduate student, you’ll collaborate with a faculty expert to develop and implement new research ideas while contributing to developments in the field.

How to Fund Graduate-Level Research

Not every graduate research or dissertation research project requires funding to get started. If your project does, below are some approaches to funding that might be of interest to you.

Faculty Research Grants

Internally and externally funded grants obtained by faculty often provide limited budget for faculty to hire students to assist with the research activities. Working on a faculty member’s grant to hone your research and methodological skills can be great preparation for your independent research. A complete listing of this Fiscal Year’s Faculty Grants is detailed on the featured research .

External Sources of Support

A sampling of external programs to fund graduate research is detailed below. Additional information is available on Grant Forward .

  • American Association of University Women American Fellowships
  • American Council of Learned Societies, ACLS/Mellon Dissertation Fellowship
  • American Educational Research Association Dissertation Grants
  • American Educational Research Association Minority Dissertation Fellowship in Education Research
  • German Academic Exchange Service, DAAD Scholarships for Study/Research in Germany
  • Graduate Fellowships for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Diversity (formerly the National Physical Science Consortium Fellowship)
  • Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy Small (Dissertation) Grants
  • Institute of International Education (IIE), Fulbright U.S. Student Program
  • International Research and Exchanges Board (IREX) Awards
  • National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowships
  • National Institute of Justice Graduate Research Fellowship Program
  • National Science Foundation Linguistics Program - Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Awards
  • The Smith Richardson Foundation Grant, World Politics and Statecraft Fellowship
  • Soros Foundation, The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans
  • U.S. Department of Education, Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) Fellowships
  • U.S. Department of Energy, DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program
  • Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships

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research for graduate student

Graduate Student Funding Opportunities

Download the most recent file here:, graduate student funding opportunities, (xlsx file; updated april 3, 2024).

This is a continuously updated repository of federal and private funding opportunities that are intended for graduate students. The opportunities are pre-sorted chronologically and alphabetically, and can be searched by funding amount and subject matter.

Although every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, please refer to the sponsor’s funding announcement for complete details on each opportunity.

If you would like to add an opportunity to the list or have any questions, please contact RDT .

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/images/cornell/logo35pt_cornell_white.svg" alt="research for graduate student"> Cornell University --> Graduate School

Research statement, what is a research statement.

The research statement (or statement of research interests) is a common component of academic job applications. It is a summary of your research accomplishments, current work, and future direction and potential of your work.

The statement can discuss specific issues such as:

  • funding history and potential
  • requirements for laboratory equipment and space and other resources
  • potential research and industrial collaborations
  • how your research contributes to your field
  • future direction of your research

The research statement should be technical, but should be intelligible to all members of the department, including those outside your subdiscipline. So keep the “big picture” in mind. The strongest research statements present a readable, compelling, and realistic research agenda that fits well with the needs, facilities, and goals of the department.

Research statements can be weakened by:

  • overly ambitious proposals
  • lack of clear direction
  • lack of big-picture focus
  • inadequate attention to the needs and facilities of the department or position

Why a Research Statement?

  • It conveys to search committees the pieces of your professional identity and charts the course of your scholarly journey.
  • It communicates a sense that your research will follow logically from what you have done and that it will be different, important, and innovative.
  • It gives a context for your research interests—Why does your research matter? The so what?
  • It combines your achievements and current work with the proposal for upcoming research.
  • areas of specialty and expertise
  • potential to get funding
  • academic strengths and abilities
  • compatibility with the department or school
  • ability to think and communicate like a serious scholar and/or scientist

Formatting of Research Statements

The goal of the research statement is to introduce yourself to a search committee, which will probably contain scientists both in and outside your field, and get them excited about your research. To encourage people to read it:

  • make it one or two pages, three at most
  • use informative section headings and subheadings
  • use bullets
  • use an easily readable font size
  • make the margins a reasonable size

Organization of Research Statements

Think of the overarching theme guiding your main research subject area. Write an essay that lays out:

  • The main theme(s) and why it is important and what specific skills you use to attack the problem.
  • A few specific examples of problems you have already solved with success to build credibility and inform people outside your field about what you do.
  • A discussion of the future direction of your research. This section should be really exciting to people both in and outside your field. Don’t sell yourself short; if you think your research could lead to answers for big important questions, say so!
  • A final paragraph that gives a good overall impression of your research.

Writing Research Statements

  • Avoid jargon. Make sure that you describe your research in language that many people outside your specific subject area can understand. Ask people both in and outside your field to read it before you send your application. A search committee won’t get excited about something they can’t understand.
  • Write as clearly, concisely, and concretely as you can.
  • Keep it at a summary level; give more detail in the job talk.
  • Ask others to proofread it. Be sure there are no spelling errors.
  • Convince the search committee not only that you are knowledgeable, but that you are the right person to carry out the research.
  • Include information that sets you apart (e.g., publication in  Science, Nature,  or a prestigious journal in your field).
  • What excites you about your research? Sound fresh.
  • Include preliminary results and how to build on results.
  • Point out how current faculty may become future partners.
  • Acknowledge the work of others.
  • Use language that shows you are an independent researcher.
  • BUT focus on your research work, not yourself.
  • Include potential funding partners and industrial collaborations. Be creative!
  • Provide a summary of your research.
  • Put in background material to give the context/relevance/significance of your research.
  • List major findings, outcomes, and implications.
  • Describe both current and planned (future) research.
  • Communicate a sense that your research will follow logically from what you have done and that it will be unique, significant, and innovative (and easy to fund).

Describe Your Future Goals or Research Plans

  • Major problem(s) you want to focus on in your research.
  • The problem’s relevance and significance to the field.
  • Your specific goals for the next three to five years, including potential impact and outcomes.
  • If you know what a particular agency funds, you can name the agency and briefly outline a proposal.
  • Give broad enough goals so that if one area doesn’t get funded, you can pursue other research goals and funding.

Identify Potential Funding Sources

  • Almost every institution wants to know whether you’ll be able to get external funding for research.
  • Try to provide some possible sources of funding for the research, such as NIH, NSF, foundations, private agencies.
  • Mention past funding, if appropriate.

Be Realistic

There is a delicate balance between a realistic research statement where you promise to work on problems you really think you can solve and over-reaching or dabbling in too many subject areas. Select an over-arching theme for your research statement and leave miscellaneous ideas or projects out. Everyone knows that you will work on more than what you mention in this statement.

Consider Also Preparing a Longer Version

  • A longer version (five–15 pages) can be brought to your interview. (Check with your advisor to see if this is necessary.)
  • You may be asked to describe research plans and budget in detail at the campus interview. Be prepared.
  • Include laboratory needs (how much budget you need for equipment, how many grad assistants, etc.) to start up the research.

Samples of Research Statements

To find sample research statements with content specific to your discipline, search on the internet for your discipline + “Research Statement.”

  • University of Pennsylvania Sample Research Statement
  • Advice on writing a Research Statement (Plan) from the journal  Science

Duke Pratt School of Engineering

Using Graduate Student Research as an Effective Recruitment Tool

Students in the Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Department presented research on a range of topics to show prospective candidates what’s possible at Duke.

students prepare research posters for symposium event

Duke’s MEMS department’s recent research symposium served as a crucial platform for graduate students to present their work to an audience of would-be Blue Devils. The event proved instrumental in highlighting the interdisciplinary nature of the department, showcasing a selection of research presentations from current MEMS graduate students. 

The symposium included more space for informal interactions with students and visitors, as posters stood outside the conference room in the Wilkinson Engineering Building with groups gathered around exchanging ideas. Lawrie Virgin, professor in the MEMS department and director of graduate studies, says it was the first time the symposium was utilized as a recruitment event.

The combination of posters and talks showcased the wide range of research being conducted in the department, providing the recruits with some in-depth access to current research projects. Lawrie Virgin Professor in the MEMS Department and Director of Graduate Studies Google Logo

“The combination of posters and talks showcased the wide range of research being conducted in the department, providing the recruits with some in-depth access to current research projects,” Virgin said. “It also allowed our current students to gain some experience in preparing their posters and engaging in talks with prospective students.”

The MEMS graduate students organizing the symposium brought their multidisciplinary research in the hopes of conducting another event in the future. “My research presentation covered the synthesis of biocompatible polymers, which can be used to 3D print medical devices,” said Maddiy Segal, a PhD candidate in mechanical engineering and materials science and member of Matthew Becker’s, Hugo L. Blomquist distinguished professor of chemistry, research group. 

“The research symposium was a valuable tool to practice presenting our findings to a more general audience. While PhD students have many opportunities to discuss their research with other scholars in their field, finding opportunities to showcase research to a broader audience is less frequent but just as important,” she shared.

research for graduate student

The graduate student committee of the MEMS department led the charge in bringing the event to a wider audience, with committee members focusing on organizing more ways to engage with other students considering coming to Duke. “I think this first symposium was a huge success,” said Annika Haughey, a PhD candidate in the TAST NRT program . 

“We had students presenting from all corners of the department–from aeroelasticity research to materials, as well as surgical robotics. I think the students gained valuable experience presenting and communicating their work effectively,” she said.   

Other students reveled in the opportunity to engage with collaborators and learn about the work of their peers. Defne Circi, a graduate student in MEMS, says the symposium sparked greater appreciation for her colleagues. “I connected with fellow computer science master’s students from the MEMS department,” she explained. “And the presentation broadened my perspective on the variety of research endeavors within our department. Personally, the experience rekindled my appreciation for the dynamic of live presentations and the irreplaceable aspect of face-to-face communication.”

Graduate Student Research

Engineering students at Duke are diving deeper into research that matters

Eight people standing in a row holding an award in front of an OEC red banner

Pushing the Limits and Advancing the Capabilities of Fiber-Optic Networks

ECE Ph.D. student Zehao Wang contributed to four papers and received awards at the world’s premier event for optical networking and communication

Students from the Ignite program pose with director Megan Madonna

Ignite Helps Students Illuminate—and Solve—Problems in Their Own Community

Once an international outreach program, Ignite helps local middle and high school students become community-minded engineers

Awards season updates

Celebrating Duke Engineering Awards for Spring 2024

Duke Engineering faculty and students garnered a wide array of awards and recognitions to start off the year

Graduate Division

Promoting Graduate Education

research for graduate student

Graduate Student Researcher (GSR)

General gsr employment information.

GSR’s are students who perform research related to the student's degree program in an academic department or research unit under the direction of a faculty member or authorized principal investigator.   Graduate students may be employed during the academic year on a part-time basis that does not to exceed 50% time.  These appointments are awarded by academic programs. 

Please be aware, the information below does not yet reflect the provisions outlined in the new UAW Collective Bargaining Agreement. We will be updating this webpage in the coming months.

Once appointed, students are expected to continue to adhere to the above requirements and to enroll in and complete 12 units of coursework or research. 

Graduate students may not be employed more than 50 percent time or 20 hours per week during the academic year in any combination of appointments. During quarter breaks and in the summer, GSRs may be employed full-time. 

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Loyola University Chicago

The graduate school, graduate research.

Research is a central part of graduate education. As part of its commitment to graduate level research, the Graduate School supports a variety of initiatives that fund research and support its presentation. Please note that research funding and travel awards detailed here are only available to students whose programs are housed on the lakeside campuses. Students enrolled in graduate programs at the Health Sciences campus should consult with the Graduate School at the Health Sciences Campus  or the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing for research-related funding programs.

Students should update  GSPS with all external awards, conference presentations, and honors received.

This competition began at the University of Queensland in Australia in 2008 as a way to "cultivate students' academic, presentation, and research communication skills... (by) explaining their research in three minutes, in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience." Universities across the world now participate in this unique event . Any graduate student conducting research for a thesis or dissertation can compete. The Graduate School hosts Loyola's competition and the winner is invited to compete in the annual regional Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools 3MT event later in the Spring. Global 3MT competition films can be seen here .

Note:  If vaccinated for COVID-19, domestic travel for conferences is allowed; international travel is allowed (within State Department guidance and at discretion of department leadership); exercise caution when traveling to areas with substantial or high COVID-19 virus transmission; compliance with City of Chicago emergency travel order required upon return.

The Graduate School encourages students to present their work at conferences throughout the United States and abroad. Students may apply for up to $750 (per academic year) in travel costs associated with presenting at a conference. Please note that travel awards are only available to current students whose programs are housed on the lakeside campuses. Students enrolled in graduate programs at the Health Sciences campus should consult with the Graduate School at the Health Sciences Campus  or the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing for travel-related funding programs. Students whose conferences fall after their thesis/dissertation defense date (for programs with a thesis/dissertation requirement) or after their final course (for those programs without a thesis/dissertation) are not eligible to apply for travel funding. 

To be considered for funding, you must apply online BEFORE  the conference takes place. To apply, log into GSPS , navigate to Award Forms > Internal Awards section, and click the "Add" button to begin. You will be required to upload proof of acceptance to a conference (i.e. an email or letter of acceptance from the conference sponsor) and a preliminary budget in one single PDF. The budget should include expected travel and lodging costs, conference registration fees, poster printing costs, and food (students must adhere to the university's current per diem rates for food). You will receive confirmation to your LUC.edu email account to let you know if your application has been approved or rejected.

Within three weeks of completing travel, please submit a completed and signed  Expense Reimbursement Form (instructions here ), your receipts (in a single PDF file, in the order they appear on your reimbursement form), and any other related conference documents to the Communication & Records Coordinator in The Graduate School. Please note that you may be required to fill out an Electronic W9/W8 Form if you haven’t filled one out in the past academic year. Incomplete or incorrect claims will cause a delay in reimbursement, so please make sure that you have filled out the forms completely, and that all necessary receipts are included. Please note: according to Accounts Payable policy, expense reimbursements submitted more than 90 days following the date of the expense or the last date of travel will be considered taxable income. 

Applications for conference travel awards will be accepted on the following schedule:

After April 15 and until June 1, students who did not receive conference funding during the appropriate application period, which includes all conferences during the current academic year, may resubmit their application.

Only $750 in travel funding per student can be granted per academic year. However, if you are awarded a partial award to cover conference registration fees, you may apply for a second award for a different conference during a later round of travel awards. Funds are limited and will be awarded based on a distribution of students in different programs, so while we do encourage you to apply earlier in the application period if you can, the applications will remain open for the full period, and simply applying on the first day of the application period will not guarantee funding.

17th Annual Graduate School Interdisciplinary Research Symposium

Saturday, April 13, 2024 Information Commons 4th Floor

The Graduate School and the Graduate Student Advisory Council host an annual interdisciplinary research symposium on the Lake Shore Campus organized around the diverse research methods exhibited in scholarly work. The symposium is an excellent forum for Loyola graduate students to present their scholarly work. Any current graduate student within The Graduate School is eligible to submit a presentation. Monetary awards will be given based on research category and student’s program status. 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

The call for abstracts usually appears in January of each year and is featured in the Graduate School newsletter. The call for proposals for next year's conference will be posted in December.

  

If you have any questions, please email the Research Symposium Committee at  [email protected] .

Office of Research Services : The Office of Research Services (ORS) assists faculty and students at the Lake Shore and Water Tower campuses with externally funded research, training and public service projects.

Institutional Review Board (IRB) : All use of human subjects including the use of any surveys, questionnaires, and interviews even with data previously obtained from human subjects must receive approval from the IRB.

Also view the  Introduction to the IRB  PowerPoint for more information.

Graduate School students who are approved in advance for a Research Funding Request may receive reimbursement of up to $500 for expenses related to the research and preparation of a dissertation, thesis, or major research paper if applicable. The Graduate School will only grant one research funding award per student, and reimbursement for the funds must be claimed within the same academic year. To apply, please submit a  Research Funding Request Form .

Once the approved activities are completed, fill out an Expense Reimbursement Form and submit it to the Graduate School along with your original receipts. If your award included gift cards or incentives of some kind, please be aware that IRS rules require that you complete a  disbursement log  tracking what was distributed.  Do not forget that the Graduate School can not reimburse   gift cards purchased with personal or departmental funds.  You MUST submit a request for the Graduate School to purchase the gift cards for you. If subjects must remain anonymous, please indicate that on your reimbursement request and list the subject’s study number on your disbursement log.

Note: Research Funding is only available to students in historically underfunded disciplines and whose programs are housed on the Lakeside Campuses. Students interested in submitting a request to purchase a laboratory supply and/or material relevant to the student’s research should reach out to the Associate Dean of the Graduate School.  

The Research Experience for Master's Programs  fellowship is designed to give Master's students an opportunity to partner with faculty members to engage in a mentored research experience that provides intellectual depth and breadth along with a capacity to think critically and reason analytically. Fellows will receive $2,000 and are selected on a competitive basis to outstanding students who have a demonstrated record of academic excellence but are in a degree program without the option of a thesis component . Students with identities that are under-represented in their disciplines are strongly encouraged to apply. 

The  Research Mentoring Program (RMP) is designed to partner graduate students who are working on their dissertation research with undergraduates who are interested in participating in research. The graduate student application deadline for this competitive summer fellowship is early December. Once the approved activities are finished, please submit original receipts and a completed reimbursement form to the Awards Coordinator in the Graduate School to receive reimbursement for expenditures.

Loyola University Chicago is committee to ensuring that all its faculty and students have the opportunity to be properly trained in the ethical and responsible conduct of research and scholarly integrity and are held to the highest possible ethical standards. All lakeside campus researchers and students receiving eternal funding from NSF or NIH or other federal agencies requiring training must complete this two-day course .  Graduate students in the Health Sciences Campus should follow the RCRS training structure on that campus.  In addition, beginning Fall 2011, the Graduate School is requiring RCRS training for all matriculating PhD students and master’s students completing a thesis.

External Funding Sources : A list of common external funding opportunities for Graduate students.

Pivot (formerly COS) Search Engine for Grant Opportunities : Pivot is the most comprehensive, premier funding search engine.

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Student Research

Nothing beats real world experience. With a student-faculty ratio of 9:1, students work closely with faculty on exploring research opportunities in the lab, the local community and around the world. Many schools have funding programs to support student research so that research experience is accessible for all.

Research Opportunities & Scholarships

The chance to practice high-level scholarly inquiry is at your fingertips. Take advantage of a wide range of centers and scholarships that can propel you forward.

Using Your Education to Solve Problems

Being enrolled at USC comes with beyond-the-classroom learning opportunities, such as improving the well-being of our immediate community, addressing questions with national and global implications, and much more.

Student Research News

Take a peek at just a few standout examples of students taking their inquiry out into the real world.

Meet the graduating senior who’s been leading USC’s Liquid Propulsion Lab

Meet the graduating senior who’s been leading USC’s Liquid Propulsion Lab

COMMENCEMENT: Soon to launch into a career at one of the nation’s top space companies, graduating student Danetti Martino has already gained ground as lead engineer of one of the nation’s top student rocketry labs.

A farm girl at heart, USC Marshall graduate finds fit in sustainability innovation

A farm girl at heart, USC Marshall graduate finds fit in sustainability innovation

COMMENCEMENT: Laurel Rankin, a master of science in social entrepreneurship graduate, follows her entrepreneurial spirit to create impact.

Keck Pride

Keck Medicine of USC earns ‘LGBTQ+ Healthcare Equality Leader’ designation

The university’s hospitals and USC Student Health earn the top score in the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s 2024 Healthcare Equality Index.

USC Dornsife sociologist Hajar Yazdiha awarded prestigious Carnegie Fellowship

USC Dornsife sociologist Hajar Yazdiha awarded prestigious Carnegie Fellowship

The assistant professor of sociology plans to focus her fellowship on tackling societal challenges through a study of truth and reconciliation practices.

Commencement preparation

USC commencement 2024: What you need to know if you’ll be attending

Thousands are expected on the University Park Campus for USC’s 141st commencement celebrations this week. You’ll want to plan accordingly.

Defining Courage event

‘Defining Courage’ event spotlights the uplifting yet tragic story of WWII Nisei soldiers

The audience of more than 500 includes surviving 98-year-old soldier Yoshio Nakamura, a proud double Trojan.

Amy Pauly coaches the Orlando Valkyries

Trojans help usher in a new era for women’s professional volleyball

Former USC student-athletes Kalyah Williams and Skylar Fields reunite with coach Amy Pauly in Orlando as part of the new Pro Volleyball Federation.

Tumor

Turning a tumor’s ‘shield’ into a weapon against itself

USC Viterbi biomedical engineers have designed a protein that targets and disables tumor cells’ defenses while marking cancer cells for death.

Professor Bob Baker Memorial Award Established by Dexter Holland will honor a pioneer in molecular biology

Professor Bob Baker Memorial Award Established by Dexter Holland will honor a pioneer in molecular biology

Holland, lead singer of The Offspring, is an alumnus of USC Dornsife’s Molecular and Computational Biology program.

USC-led study introduces improved way to grow cells that give rise to kidney’s filtration system

USC-led study introduces improved way to grow cells that give rise to kidney’s filtration system

Scientists report significant progress in cultivating nephron progenitor cells.

USC Bridge Institute

A launchpad for projects combining diverse disciplines in science, engineering, medicine and the arts, Bridge Institute leverages the strengths of diverse experts to act as a connector that trains fearless researchers, supports convergence and empowers collaborative problem-solving.

Opportunities for Graduate Students

A student looking at a computer while attending a Zoom meeting.

Center for Advanced Genocide Research

Recognizing USC undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students who use USC’s Visual History Archive or other genocide-related resources at USC for innovative research projects, this award is open to students across all academic disciplines.

USC Dornsife students kneeling on a beach conduct marine research through the USC Wrigley Institute located on Catalina Island.

Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI)

While the search for extraterrestrial life is neverending, USC scientists have launched the search intra-terrestrially — they’re hunting for life below the ocean floor. Graduate students contemplating a career in scientific research are encouraged to apply for a variety of opportunities.

A researcher using a pipette while working in a lab.

Institute on Inequalities in Global Health (IIGH)

With partners in civil society, academia, government and the UN, IIGH offers several fellowship opportunities for students and postdocs interested in conducting research both in the U.S. and internationally.

A man filming an actress that is wearing a body suit with motion sensors attached to it.

More Research Opportunities

These are just a sample of the many research opportunities  available to graduate students. Find one that works for you.

Opportunities for Undergraduate Students

Undergraduate research is a key part of the complex, robust research ecosystem that makes up USC. Take a look at just some of the many funding opportunities you can explore.

Various schools and divisions offer funding for fields of research that fall under their disciplines.

  • USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
  • USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
  • USC Sol Price School of Public Policy
  • USC Viterbi School of Engineering

The USC Bridge Institute is training the next generation of students to explore across scientific disciplines and connect with the arts to understand science in a deeper way. Learn more.

MMUF is a partnership between the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences  and USC’s Office of the Provost to identify, support and mentor highly qualified underrepresented undergraduate students and other students interested in diversifying fields of study in higher education. Learn more.

Founded to increase the number of women in faculty positions and increase the representation of women in science and engineering, WiSE gives upper-level undergraduate women first-hand experience in laboratory-based research and other programs. Learn more.

Tech4Good Opportunities

Students also lead their own initiatives to better the world. There are several Tech4Good organizations that allow students to engage with issues that matter to them: Code the Change , Shift SC , and CAIS++ .

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research for graduate student

Journal of Student Research

Journal of Student Research (JSR) is an Academic, Multidisciplinary, and Faculty-reviewed Journal (Houston, Texas) devoted to the Rapid Dissemination of Current Research Published by High School Edition , Undergraduate and Graduate students.

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The journal seeks articles that are novel, integrative, and accessible to a broad audience, including an array of disciplines. The content of the journal ranges from Applied research to Theoretical research. In general, papers on all topics are welcome to submit. The journal uses an automated process from manuscript submission to publication. Manuscript submission, peer review, and publication are all handled online, and the journal automates all clerical steps during peer review.

Trusted By Student Authors Globally

research for graduate student

Focus and Scope

Students strive to be successful at publications, and with JSR, authors aspiring to publish will receive scholarly feedback after the reviews of their submissions are received. This feedback will help authors identify areas of improvement to their submission and help them better understand the process to be successful at publication. Once published, we strive to provide a global platform for our authors to showcase their work.

Journal Support for Published Articles

Faculty-Refereed Review Process

This journal uses a double-blind review, which means that both the reviewer and author identities are concealed from the reviewers, and vice versa, throughout the review process. Authors need to ensure that their manuscripts do not give away their identity to facilitate this. To find out more about the review process, please visit the  Author Guidelines  page. We invite teachers and faculty interested in reviewing articles for this journal; please visit our  Reviewers  page for more information.

Open Access Policy

This journal provides access to its published content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Learn more about  Open Access .

Authors Retain Copyright

Articles published in this journal are under a  Creative Commons License , and the authors retain the copyright to their work.

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Call for papers: volume 13 issue 3.

If you are an undergraduate or graduate student at a college or university aspiring to publish, we are accepting submissions. Submit Your Article Now!

Deadline: 11:59 p.m. May 31, 2024

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10 facts about today’s college graduates

A San Jose State University graduate prepares for commencement ceremonies with his family in December 2021.

Having a bachelor’s degree remains an important advantage in many sectors of the U.S. labor market. College graduates generally out-earn those who have not attended college, and they are more likely to be employed in the first place. At the same time, many Americans say they cannot afford to get a four-year degree – or that they just don’t want to.

Here are key facts about American college graduates.

This Pew Research Center analysis about U.S. college graduates relies on data from sources including the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the National Center for Education Statistics, the National Student Clearinghouse and the Federal Reserve Bank, as well as surveys conducted by the Center.

Everyone who took the Pew Research Center surveys cited is a member of the Center’s American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This way nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories. Read more about  the ATP’s methodology .

Nearly four-in-ten Americans ages 25 and older have a bachelor’s degree, a share that has grown over the last decade. As of 2021, 37.9% of adults in this age group held a bachelor’s degree, including 14.3% who also obtained a graduate or professional degree, according to data from the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey. That share is up 7.5 percentage points from 30.4% in 2011.

An additional 10.5% had an associate degree in 2021. About four-in-ten Americans ages 25 and older had a high school diploma with no further education (25.3%) or completed some college but didn’t have a degree (14.9%).

In a reversal, women are now more likely than men to graduate from college, according to the Current Population Survey . In 2021, 39% of women ages 25 and older had a bachelor’s degree or more education, compared with 37% of men in the same age range. The gap in college completion is even wider among adults ages 25 to 34: 46% of women in this age group have at least a bachelor’s degree, compared with 36% of men.

A line graph showing that women in the U.S. are outpacing men in college graduation

In an October 2021 Pew Research Center survey of Americans without a degree, 34% of men said a major reason why they have not received a four-year college degree is that they just didn’t want to. Only one-in-four women said the same. Men were also more likely to say a major reason they didn’t have a four-year degree is that they didn’t need more education for the job or career they wanted (26% of men said this vs. 20% of women).

A chart showing that about a third of men who haven't completed four years of college say they 'just didn't want to' get a degree

Women (44%) were more likely than men (39%) to say not being able to afford college was a major reason they don’t have a bachelor’s degree. Men and women were about equally likely to say a major impediment was needing to work to help support their family.

A line graph showing that since 2000, the share of Americans with a bachelor's degree has increased across all races and ethnicities

There are racial and ethnic differences in college graduation patterns, as well as in the reasons for not completing a degree. Among adults ages 25 and older, 61% of Asian Americans have a bachelor’s degree or more education, along with 42% of White adults, 28% of Black adults and 21% of Hispanic adults, according to 2021 Current Population Survey data. The share of bachelor’s degree holders in each group has increased since 2010. That year, 52% of Asian Americans had a four-year degree or more, compared with a third of White adults, 20% of Black adults and 14% of Hispanic adults.

The October 2021 Center survey found that among adults without a bachelor’s degree, Hispanic adults (52%) were more likely than those who are White (39%) or Black (41%) to say a major reason they didn’t graduate from a four-year college is that they couldn’t afford it. Hispanic and Black adults were more likely than their White counterparts to say needing to work to support their family was a major reason.

While a third of White adults said not wanting to go to school was a major reason they didn’t complete a four-year degree, smaller shares of Black (22%) and Hispanic (23%) adults said the same. White adults were also more likely to cite not needing more education for the job or career they wanted. (There weren’t enough Asian adults without a bachelor’s degree in the sample to analyze separately.)

A bar chart showing that only about 62% of college students finish their program within six years

Only 62% of students who start a degree or certificate program finish their program within six years, according to the most recent data from the  National Student Clearinghouse , a nonprofit verification and research organization that tracked first-time college students who enrolled in fall 2015 with the intent of pursuing a degree or certificate. The degree completion rate for this group was highest among students who started at four-year, private, nonprofit schools (78.3%), and lowest among those who started at two-year public institutions (42.2%).

Business is the most commonly held bachelor’s degree, followed by health professions.  According to the  National Center for Education Statistics , about a fifth (19%) of the roughly 2 million bachelor’s degrees conferred in 2019-20 were in business. Health professions and related programs were the second most-popular field, making up 12.6% of degrees conferred that year. Business has been the single most common major since 1980-81; before that, education led the way.

The  least  common bachelor’s degrees in 2019-20 were in military technologies and applied sciences (1,156 degrees conferred in 2019-20), library science (118), and precision production (39).

There is a growing earnings gap between young college graduates and their counterparts without degrees. In 2021, full-time workers ages 22 to 27 who held a bachelor’s degree, but no further education, made a median annual wage of $52,000, compared with $30,000 for full-time workers of the same age with a high school diploma and no degree, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This gap has widened over time. Young bachelor’s degree holders earned a median annual wage of $48,481 in 1990, compared with $35,257 for full-time workers ages 22 to 27 with a high school diploma.

The unemployment rate is lower for college graduates than for workers without a bachelor’s degree, and that gap widened as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. In February 2020, just before the COVID-19 outbreak began in the U.S., only 1.9% of college graduates ages 25 and older were unemployed, compared with 3.1% of workers who completed some college but not a four-year degree, and 3.7% of workers with only a high school diploma. By June 2020, after the pandemic hit, 6.8% of college grads, 10.8% of workers with some college, and 12.2% of high school grads were unemployed.

By March 2022, the unemployment rate had nearly returned to pre-pandemic levels for college graduates (2%) while dropping to 3% among those with some college education but no four-year degree, and 4% among those with only a high school diploma.

A line graph showing that underemployed recent college grads are becoming less likely to work in 'good non-college jobs'

Recent college graduates are more likely than graduates overall to be underemployed – that is, working in jobs that typically do not require a college degree, according to an analysis of Census Bureau and BLS data by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York . As of December 2021, 41% of college graduates ages 22 to 27 were underemployed, compared with 34% among all college graduates. The underemployment rates for recent college grads rose in 2020 as the COVID-19 outbreak strained the job market, but have since returned to pre-pandemic levels.

As of the end of 2021, only 34% of underemployed graduates ages 22 to 27 worked what the Fed defines as “good non-college jobs” – those paying at least $45,000 a year – down from around half in the 1990s. The share of underemployed graduates ages 22 to 27 in low-wage jobs – those earning less than $25,000 annually – rose from about 9% in 1990 to 11% last year.

A chart showing that among household heads with at least a bachelor's degree, those with a college-educated parent are typically wealthier and have greater incomes

When it comes to income and wealth accumulation, first-generation college graduates lag substantially behind those with college-educated parents, according to a May 2021 Pew Research Center analysis . Households headed by a first-generation college graduate – that is, someone who has completed at least a bachelor’s degree but does not have a parent with a college degree – had a median annual income of $99,600 in 2019, compared with $135,800 for households headed by those with at least one parent who graduated from college. The median wealth of households headed by first-generation college graduates ($152,000) also trailed that of households headed by someone with a parent who graduated from college ($244,500). The higher household income of the latter facilitates saving and wealth accumulation.

The gap also reflects differences in how individuals finance their education. Second-generation college graduates tend to come from  more affluent families , while first-generation college graduates are more likely to incur education debt than those with a college-educated parent.

Most Americans with college degrees see value in their experience. In the Center’s October 2021 survey , majorities of graduates said their college education was extremely or very useful when it came to helping them grow personally and intellectually (79%), opening doors to job opportunities (70%) and developing specific skills and knowledge that could be used in the workplace (65%).

Younger college graduates were less likely than older ones to see value in their college education. For example, only a third of college graduates younger than 50 said their college experience was extremely useful in helping them develop skills and knowledge that could be used in the workplace. Among college graduates ages 50 and older, 45% said this.

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Katherine Schaeffer is a research analyst at Pew Research Center .

Most Americans think U.S. K-12 STEM education isn’t above average, but test results paint a mixed picture

About 1 in 4 u.s. teachers say their school went into a gun-related lockdown in the last school year, about half of americans say public k-12 education is going in the wrong direction, what public k-12 teachers want americans to know about teaching, what’s it like to be a teacher in america today, most popular.

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Application Closed Visit Zintellect for other opportunities.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Water Power Technologies Office (WPTO) conducts early-stage research and development (R&D) to strengthen the body of scientific and engineering knowledge supporting industry efforts to develop new technologies that increase U.S. hydropower and marine energy.

To view the list of potential hosting facilities please visit the DOE Host Institutions page.

What will I be doing?

As a participant in the Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program, you will conduct research at both your academic institution and at an external hosting facility carrying out research in marine energy (ME) and supporting the research plan you submit at the time of application. Hosting facility may be a government research facility, industry site (including but not limited to technology developers), or other facility approved by WPTO as a host facility. You will spend a minimum of six months at the host facility, virtually or in person.

Learn more about what is required for your proposed research plan in application components .

Why should I apply?

As an intern in the Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program, you will

  • Advance your Master’s or Doctoral thesis.
  • Enhance your education and training in water power technologies fields.
  • Increase your marketability.
  • Gain access to top scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.
  • Gain insight into research and career opportunities through your internship experiences.
  • Collaborate and learn from experts researching, developing, and testing emerging technologies.

You will enhance your education and training in ME related fields, increase your marketability in these disciplines, and learn about careers in marine energy research. Your mentor may also be a resource for your next career step!

Announcing the 2023 Cohort of Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program Fellows

Hannah brachfeld oregon state university.

hannah-brachfield.webp

Proposed Research Topic

Roles and responsibilities of the DOD (United States Navy) and DHS (United States Coast Guard) in MRE policy and planning.

Host Facility

U.S. Fleet Forces Command, Office of Fleet Installations and Environment.

Brittany Lydon University of Washington

brittany-lydon.webp

Evaluate OSWEC performance and the potential for data-driven modeling in optimal WEC control.

National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Nicole Marone University of New Hampshire

nicole-marone.webp

Develop FSI models for a cross-flow turbine (CFT).

Ocean Renewable Power Company and Sandia National Laboratories

Alexander Robinson University of Washington

alexander-robinson.webp

Develop reliable quantification methods for changes to concentration of major and trace elements in natural seawater matrix.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Sequim campus

Increase your marketability in technologies for clean, domestic power generation from resources such as hydropower, waves and tides.
Learn the inner workings of federal agencies in your field and network with top scientists.
Gain insight into research and career opportunities while utilizing state-of-the-art equipment to accomplish research goals.

Appointment Details

Eligibility.

In order to qualify for a Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program appointment, you must meet all outlined criteria for eligibility. Read more to learn about eligibility requirements.

To be considered you must meet all outlined criteria for eligibility.

  • Be a U.S. Citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident.
  • Be enrolled as a full-time master’s or doctoral graduate student at a qualified program requiring a research thesis/dissertation at an accredited U.S. college or university during the Fall 2023 term.
  • Be conducting research in an area aligned with ME priority research areas.
  • Have a cumulative graduate GPA of 3.00 or higher on a 4.00 scale.
  • Be available to conduct research at the hosting facility for at least six months in person or virtually.

Application Selection

Applications will be reviewed for eligibility and compliance before moving forward to the merit review and final selection.

  • Academic performance
  • Potential for success in research
  • Background, skills and experience to conduct proposed research
  • Understanding of scientific and technical challenges in proposed research plan
  • Method and approach for proposed research plan
  • Potential for significant contribution to thesis research
  • Research relevance to ME priorities
  • Potential for broadening investigation and innovation in ME problems and solutions
  • Eligible applications will receive an external merit review by subject matter experts.
  • ME makes final selections based on reviewer results and notifies ORISE.
  • ORISE will notify the applicants of the selection decisions .

This internship is open for applications during the fall of each year. 

2024 Application Year

Application open, application close, application review, selection made and announced, expected start date, appointment information.

Appointments will be administered by ORISE. This section outlines all of the allowances you will receive as part of the Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program and the conditions of the appointment.

As a participant in the Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program, you will receive:

  • C ompetitive monthly stipend based on academic level
  • Health Insurance supplement
  • Limited reimbursement for transportation expenses for travel to/from the external hosting facility (if eligible)
  • Education and Research Support Allowance
  • Limited Tuition Reimbursement
  • Appointment Period: You will be responsible for coordinating the appointment start and end dates with your hosting facility. Normally, appointment periods will be for 12 months. Appointment periods can be less than twelve months as long as you spend at least six months at your hosting facility virtually or in person.
  • Hosting Facility:  Appointments are subject to completion of the arrangements with your hosting facility.
  • Conduct research and maintain a schedule away from your academic institution at the WPTO approved facility for at least six months of the appointment, virtually or in person. You must avoid obligations that may interrupt your research project during the appointment.
  • Adhere to ethical guidelines set forth by DOE.
  • Perform professionally, demonstrate integrity and good judgment, and complete all research project deliverables as identified in your research plan and by the hosting facility.
  • Deliverables: Participants are required to write a final report about their experience and complete an online feedback form to help assess the effectiveness of the program.

Nature of Appointment

This program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

  • ORISE is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asset managed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) through a contract between ORAU and DOE.
  • You will be considered a program participant and will not enter into an employee/employer relationship with ORISE, ORAU, DOE, or hosting facility.

There is no deadline for application submission. Applications will be reviewed as they are submitted. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis throughout the year, so do not hesitate, Apply Now! Visit Zintellect’s Internship Catalog , keyword "Solar".

Find out more

Application Components

Your application should consist of the following components:

  • Complete Zintellect Profile
  • Summary of your motivation for the research
  • Methods that will be employed
  • Role of your academic institution and your host facility in furthering your research plan
  • Expected outcomes
  • Relevance to the WPTO mission and marine energy generation
  • Relation of the proposed research to your graduate thesis
  • Contact information for your Advisor at your Academic Institution, including Name, Email, Phone Number, College/University, Department, and Position Title
  • Contact information for your proposed Mentor at your External Hosting Facility, including Name, Email, Phone Number, Facility Name, Department/Division, and Position Title. Facility may not be your own academic institution .
  • The letter must demonstrate knowledge of and concurrence with your proposed research plan and agreement to host you at their facility for a minimum of six months (virtually or in person) if you are accepted into the Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program.
  • Letter from authorized academic department official or other document issued/authorized by the academic institution confirming your enrollment. Letter or document must include your name and official university markings such as the registrar’s signature, university logo or stamp, letterhead or watermark, signature of the authorized official, etc.
  • Copy of the transcript or academic record issued by the Registrar’s Office including official university markings such as the registrar’s signature, university logo or stamp, letterhead or watermark, etc. Transcript must include courses in progress during the 2023 Fall term.
  • Resume (2 page limit)
  • This letter should address your academic record and potential for success in the Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program, as indicated by demonstrated intellectual merit, communication, and teamwork skills.
  • You must provide one letter from your current academic advisor. The mentor at your proposed external hosting facility may provide a letter of recommendation that is separate from their letter of support.

Frequently Asked Questions

This section includes frequently asked questions about the Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program.

Applications will be accepted between September and December, with application period closing in December. Selections will be made by March, and participants are expected to start their appointment period in June. There are several steps that must be completed before you can receive an appointment letter.

You must be a U.S. Citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident to participate in the program.

You must be enrolled as a full-time doctoral graduate student at a qualified program requiring a research thesis/dissertation at an accredited U.S. college or university. If you are participating in an exchange program and attending a foreign institution, you must provide proof that you are enrolled in an accredited U.S. college or university during the Fall 2023 term.

Records are required showing current enrollment in a MS or Ph.D. program requiring thesis/dissertation. Unofficial transcripts or copies of the student academic records provided by the applicant or by academic advisors from internal institutional systems may be submitted. Transcripts or academic records must include courses in progress during the 2023 Fall term. If your transcripts or academic records do not list the thesis/dissertation requirement, then you must provide separate documentation.

Alternatively, a letter from authorized academic department official or other document issued/authorized by the academic institution confirming your enrollment may be submitted. Letter or document must include your name and official university markings such as the registrar’s signature, university logo or stamp, letterhead or watermark, signature of the authorized official, etc. and confirmation that you are enrolled in a MS or Ph.D. program requiring thesis or dissertation.

ORISE staff will prescreen applications to ensure that all required materials have been received and that you meet all qualifications for participation in the program. Eligible applications are then reviewed by independent subject matter experts. Results from reviewers are then shared with WPTO, who makes final selections and notifies ORISE. ORISE will notify you if you are selected for the program.

The minimum appointment period for this program is six months at the identified hosting facility in person or virtually.

It is your responsibility to identify and secure a hosting facility and mentor currently conducting or directing research in an area of importance to WPTO. For more information about WPTO, visit https://www.energy.gov/eere/water/water-power-technologies-office .

WPTO is committed to developing and deploying a portfolio of innovative technologies for clean, domestic power generation from resources such as hydropower, waves, and tides. For more information about WPTO priorities, visit https://www.energy.gov/eere/water/about-water-power-technologies-office-WPTO .

Please ensure that all of the necessary application materials have been received and that you have the necessary educational qualifications. Successful applicants will have a research plan that is well thought out and clearly aligns with WPTO areas of importance as well as a strong commitment from their mentor and hosting institution.

You, along with your mentor at the hosting institution, will be responsible for any changes made to the research plan. Changes to your research plan should be approved by the hosting institution mentor and should not fall outside areas of importance to WPTO. Final approval and acceptance of the change in research plan must come from WPTO.

One relevant letter of reference is required. This letter should address your academic record and potential for success in an appointment, as indicated by demonstrated intellectual merit, communication, and teamwork skills.

No. you must be enrolled as a full-time Master’s or Doctoral graduate student at an accredited U.S. college or university.

If your address is outside a radius of 50 miles one way from your appointment location, you will be reimbursed for limited inbound transportation expenses.

Reasonable accommodations can be made if you intend to travel prior to the start of your appointment. These are handled on a case by case basis.

We do not advise you to do this. Doing so may result in non-reimbursable expenses. Your appointment is not official until you formally accept the appointment offer.

You may apply for and be eligible to participate in different ORISE programs during your graduate studies.

Participants will receive a stipend payment once a month in the amount of $2,950.00 when pursuing a doctoral degree and $2,500 when pursuing a master’s degree.

To be on appointment, participants are required to have continuous coverage under a health insurance plan and provide proof of coverage to ORISE. A stipend supplement will be provided to offset the cost of a health insurance plan up to $1,737.94/month. This stipend supplement will be based on monthly out-of-pocket health insurance premium expenses up to the approved amount upon receipt of the appropriate documentation.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Non-Academic Research Internships for Graduate Students in Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies (Hydrogen INTERN) Supplemental Funding Opportunity

May 6, 2024

Dear Colleague:

Fostering the growth of a globally competitive and diverse research workforce and advancing the scientific and innovation skills of U.S. students are strategic objectives of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Supporting the development of a skilled workforce in energy efficiency and renewable energy is a strategic objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NSF and DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) have established a partnership to support internship and training opportunities to meet these strategic objectives with a focus on hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. A new generation of skilled workforce is needed to drive research and development of hydrogen production, delivery, infrastructure, storage, fuel cells, and multiple end uses across transportation, industrial, and stationary power applications. For more information on DOE-EERE's priorities for hydrogen energy research, please see the DOE's Hydrogen Program Areas and the U.S. National Clean Hydrogen Strategy Roadmap .

This Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) describes this unique partnership with DOE EERE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (HFTO) and is aligned with and conforms with the NSF INTERN opportunity described in the Dear Colleague Letter: Non-Academic Research Internships for Graduate Students (INTERN) Supplemental Funding Opportunity . This DCL is referred to as the Hydrogen INTERN DCL.

SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

NSF will consider supplemental funding requests in the broad area of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies that enable PIs (or Co-PIs) to request supplemental support of up to $55,000 and six months for graduate students supported on active NSF grants with the following goals:

  • To provide graduate students with the opportunity to augment their research assistantships or NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) fellowships with research internship activities and training opportunities that will complement their academic research training.
  • To allow graduate students to pursue new activities aimed at acquiring professional development experience that will enhance their preparation for multiple career pathways after graduation.
  • To encourage the participation of the full spectrum of diverse talent in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITIES SUPPORTED

The PI/co-PI of an active NSF award may request supplemental funding for one or more graduate students to gain knowledge, skills, training, and experiences in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and their application areas.

Internship hosts include, but are not limited to:

  • Private sector companies, laboratories, or industry research and development groups.
  • Start-up businesses such as, but not limited to, those funded through the NSF's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs.
  • Department of Energy Laboratories, other government agencies (all levels), and National Laboratories.
  • Museums, science centers, and other informal learning settings that educate the public.
  • Policy think-tanks.
  • Non-profit organizations.

Prior to submission, PIs are encouraged to discuss possible INTERN supplements with the cognizant NSF Program Director Points of Contact listed in this DCL to ensure the proposed internship and its topic are a good fit for this DCL. It is expected that the graduate student and the PI on the NSF grant will work together to identify experiences that add the most educational value for the graduate student through activities that are not already available at the student's academic institution. Further, it is expected that the internship will be research-focused and will be on-site at the host organization unless a specific exception to this is granted by the cognizant Program Director due to extenuating circumstances.

ELIGIBILITY

To be eligible for this opportunity, graduate students must have completed at least one academic year in their graduate program (master's or doctoral) prior to commencement of the proposed INTERN activity and be making satisfactory progress toward completion of their degree.

SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING REQUEST PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS

Information about requesting supplemental support is contained in the NSF PAPPG ), Chapter VI.E.5. In addition to the PAPPG requirements for supplemental support, the following materials must be included.

  • A two-page summary that describes the internship
  • A one-page personal statement from the graduate student describing career goals, accomplishments, and how the activity will better prepare the individual to enter the workforce.
  • Research summary to include contribution(s) to research discipline
  • Institution(s)
  • Year of study (1st year, 2nd year, etc.)
  • Completed coursework
  • Employment and volunteer/outreach history
  • Publications (accepted only)
  • Other information relevant to the proposed internship
  • A letter of collaboration from an authorized official at the host organization that describes the internship opportunity and mentoring the student will experience during the internship. The letter should include a statement confirming that neither the graduate student nor the PI has a financial interest in the organization hosting the internship.
  • An endorsement letter from the PI that confirms that the student meets the eligibility requirements specified in this DCL. The letter must describe how the proposed internship activity will contribute to the student's graduate education experience and how it may impact time to degree.
  • The NSF recipient and Host Organization must agree in advance as to how intellectual property (IP) rights will be handled. A signed agreement on IP (including publication and patent rights) must be submitted either as a supplementary document or, via email to the cognizant Program Director after submission of the supplementary funding request and prior to the award of the supplemental funding. NSF is responsible neither for the agreement reached nor the IP information exchanged between the NSF recipient and Host Organization.
  • A budget and budget justification.

SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING AMOUNT

The total amount of funding requested must not exceed $55,000 per student per six-month period. NSF plans to fund up to approximately 10 or more supplements in each fiscal year starting with FY 2024, depending on availability of funds.

ALLOWABLE COSTS UNDER THIS DCL

Funds may be used to support travel, tuition and fees, health insurance, additional stipend, and temporary relocation costs for the graduate student. Additional stipends are not allowed for GRFP fellows "on tenure" (currently receiving a GRFP stipend), but a stipend will be considered for fellows "on reserve" (not currently receiving a GRFP stipend) equal to the monthly rate of the GRFP stipend. Up to $2,500 may be used for the PI or the graduate research fellow's advisor to travel to work with the host organization in co-mentoring the student during the internship. Up to $2,500 may be used for materials and supplies to support the student during the internship. Travel costs must be allocated in the budget request for the graduate student to travel once to Washington DC, to present the outcomes of the INTERN project at the DOE's Annual Merit Review meeting. The recipient is permitted to request indirect costs in accordance with their approved/negotiated indirect cost rate. The total requested budget cannot exceed the limits listed under the "Supplement funding amount" section above. Note: Spousal and dependent travel are not supported.

PERIOD OF SUPPORT

The supplement funding will provide up to six months of support for an internship. Up to two supplemental funding requests may be submitted on a grant per student. This would allow the student up to two internship periods of up to six months each (i.e., a maximum of 12 months per student).

Supplemental funding requests may be submitted at any time with a target date of June 15 for Fiscal Year 2024 and April 15 for future Fiscal Years.

SUBMISSION & REVIEW

Requests for supplemental funding must be submitted electronically via Research.gov. A PI or co-PI on an NSF award must contact his/her cognizant program director prior to submission. GRFP INTERN supplement requests are submitted by the GRFP PI, not by the GRFP fellow or the fellow's research advisor. Requests for supplemental funding submitted in response to this DCL will be reviewed internally by NSF Program Officers. All supplements are subject to (a) the availability of funds, and (b) merit review of the supplemental funding request.

SPECIAL AWARD CONDITION

Intellectual Property Rights: Internships under this DCL are considered equivalent to traineeships. The National Science Foundation claims no rights to any inventions or writings that might result from its traineeship awards. However, trainees should be aware that NSF, another Federal agency, or some private party may acquire such rights through other support for particular research. Also, trainees should note their obligation to include an Acknowledgment and Disclaimer in any publication.

POLICY OR CODE ADDRESSING HARASSMENT

Recipients are required to have a policy or code of conduct that addresses sexual harassment, other forms of harassment, and sexual assault. The recipient should work with the Host Organization to ensure that the Host Organization also has a policy or code of conduct that addresses sexual harassment, other forms of harassment, and sexual assault including reporting and complaint procedures and to confirm that such policy both covers and protects INTERN students interacting with the Host Organization. The recipient should also coordinate with the Host Organization to provide orientation to graduate students to cover expectations of behavior to ensure a safe and respectful environment, and to review the recipient and host organization's policy or code of conduct addressing sexual harassment, other forms of harassment, and sexual assault, including reporting and complaint procedures. For additional information, see the NSF policies at https://new.nsf.gov/stopping-harassment .

Susan Marqusee, Assistant Director Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO)

Dilma Da Silva, Acting Assistant Director Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE)

James L. Moore III, Assistant Director Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EDU)

Susan Margulies, Assistant Director Directorate for Engineering (ENG)

Alexandra Isern, Assistant Director Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

C. Denise Caldwell, Acting Assistant Director Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS)

Alicia Knoedler, Office Head Office of Integrative Activities (OIA)

Kendra Sharp, Office Head Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE)

Kaye Husbands Fealing, Assistant Director Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE)

Erwin Gianchandani, Assistant Director Directorate for Technology, Innovation and Partnership (TIP)

Graduate Student Research Grant Program

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Graduate Student Research Grant Call for Proposals Closed

The Call for 2024 Graduate Student Research Grant Proposals has closed. Sign up for our mailing list to learn about future calls

Additional Resources

  • Budget Justification and Narrative Spreadsheet
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  • How to Submit Your Proposal in the Online Grant Management System
  • How to Complete a Budget Justification and Narrative
  • Using the Budget Justification and Narrative Template to Guide Your Proposal
  • Graduate Student Research Grant Program Video Summary

Northeast SARE offers grants to graduate students to conduct research on topics specific to sustainable agriculture under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Proposals should address issues of current or potential importance to Northeast farmers, agricultural researchers, and farm support professionals like NRCS personnel, Extension educators, and nonprofit staff.

Projects may address a range of topics including, but not limited to, cropping systems, pest management, livestock health, social sustainability, soil quality, farm energy production, farm labor, urban agriculture, and the marketing of local agricultural products. They must also explore one or more of the sustainable agriculture themes of environmental stewardship, profitability, and quality of life for farmers and the farm community. Projects must be consistent with our outcome statement and address the program’s review criteria.

To see examples of funded Graduate Student Research Grant projects, visit the national SARE database at: projects.sare.org/search-projects/.

Eligible Applicants

This grant program is open to any graduate student enrolled at an accredited college, university, or veterinary school who is proposing to conduct research in the Northeast region. Proposals are limited to one per graduate student per year. An individual student may receive only one Northeast SARE Graduate Student Grant over the course of their studies.

Northeast SARE encourages projects submitted from or in collaboration with the LGBTQ+ community and Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC). Additionally, we encourage projects submitted from or in collaboration with Minority Serving Institutions (including 1890 land grant institutions and other historically Black colleges and universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and tribal colleges and universities) and other organizations in the Northeast that work with historically underrepresented communities.

Proposals must be written by the graduate student applicant, in support of their individual research effort and not that of a group project or team of researchers. While collaboration is encouraged, the graduate student applicant will be the manager and contact for the project, if funded. As such, they are expected to lead all aspects of the application and subsequently to make sure the proposed work is completed, and project reports are filed in a timely fashion.

If the project is part of a larger project or thesis, the portion of work proposed for SARE funding must be clearly identified.

Applicants and host organizations may be located outside of the Northeast region if the project activities and the audience served are located within the Northeast region. Current SARE grant recipients who are behind in their reporting will not be awarded a new project.

Northeast SARE will not fund proposals that appear to duplicate work that has been approved for funding by another grant program within or external to SARE. It is the applicant’s responsibility to make clear to reviewers that any proposed work is unique, especially if it is similar to work proposed to another grant program. The proposed work may build on or complement another project, but it must be clearly differentiated. If a SARE proposal is approved for funding and a proposal to fund the same work is also approved by another grant program, only one source of funding can be accepted. Application deadline has passed.

We encourage you to reach out to us regarding any challenges you experience as you plan and submit your proposal. To do so or to specifically request a disability-related accommodation, please contact Northeast SARE as soon as possible at 802-651-8335 or [email protected]. Depending on the type of request it may take our team two or more weeks to provide accommodations. We appreciate advance notice, so we have time to effectively address your request.

The Role of Faculty Advisors

Because universities typically do not allow students to manage institutional grant awards, the student applicant's faculty advisor will be named the principal investigator of the awarded grant. The faculty advisor must endorse the proposal and act as the official principal investigator; therefore, they must ensure the project and budgeted expenditures proposed are acceptable.

Timing & Funds Available

Grants are capped at $15,000 and projects can run up to two years. Proposals are typically due in the spring with a late summer start date.

Please contact Northeast SARE with your questions.

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NSF Graduate Student Mentoring Plans: Resources for PIs

Thursday, june 6 | 1-2 pm, virtual event.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has begun requiring investigators to describe mentoring plans for graduate students funded on awards, similar to postdoctoral mentoring plans required previously.

In this Research How-To event, Sarah Hokanson and Claire Cordella of BU’s Research Development office will describe the new requirements, their implications for new NSF submissions or renewals, and the resources available to develop plans that meet federal requirements and support student mentees.

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USM Graduate School holds annual Susan A. Siltanen Graduate Student Research Symposium

Mon, 05/06/2024 - 11:23am | By: Shaadi Shoubaki

Winneres

USM graduate students were recognized for their research at The University of Southern Mississippi (USM) Graduate School’s annual Susan A. Siltanen Graduate Student Research Symposium held in April on the Hattiesburg campus (USM photo)

More than 70 students participated in The University of Southern Mississippi (USM) Graduate School’s annual Susan A. Siltanen Graduate Student Research Symposium, held April 18 on the Hattiesburg campus.

The symposium provides graduate students with an opportunity to present their research to faculty, staff, and students in a welcoming environment through oral and poster presentations. The symposium is designed to highlight the innovative scholarship conducted by USM graduate students. Additionally, the 2024 Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year and Graduate Assistants of the Year award winners were announced at the Symposium Award luncheon.

The 2024 Graduate Student Research Symposium Winners include:

Oral Presentations:

Arts and Humanities

*1st place: Rubaiya Zannat, Communication Ph.D.

We Can Do This: Understanding COVID-19 Vaccine Campaign Elements Through Message Frames, Approaches and Emotional Appeals  

*2nd place: Kate Mackey, Anthropology M.A.

"Anthropology Jr.": Introducing the Four Subfields of Anthropology to K-12 Students

Physical Sciences and Mathematics

*1st place: Ethan Rose, Polymer Sciences and Engineering Ph.D.

Thermally Stable Bicyclic Bio-based Building Blocks for Epoxy-Amine Thermosets: Unlocking the Potential of 2,5-pentalenediol Derivatives.  

*2nd place: Anthony Griffin, Polymer Sciences and Engineering Ph.D.

Upcycling Polypropylene Textile Waste to Carbon-based Joule Heaters

Social and Educational Sciences and Business

*1st place: Christy Oberst, Higher Education Administration Ed.D.

Examining Professional Development of Academic Advisors in Higher Education

*2nd place: Priscilla Moore, Higher Education Administration Ed.D.

Higher Education Faculty Use of Social and Emotional Learning Techniques with Undergraduate Students

Life, Health, and Environmental Sciences

*1st place: Enzo Ferriera, Sport Security Management

When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors! Proposing Lightning Safety Best Practices for Intercollegiate Athletic Programs  

*2nd place: Langston Haden, Biological Sciences Ph.D.

Leveraging Ecological Theory to Advance the Conservation of the Louisiana Pearlshell Mussel

Poster Presentations

1st place: Peter Kalejaiye, Human Capital Development Ph.D.

Exploring Employers’ and Disability Organizations Partnerships’ Effectiveness in Recruiting, Hiring, Training, Retaining, and Accommodating Individuals with Disabilities in Mississippi

2nd place: Heather Miller, Human Capital Development Ph.D.

The Intersection of Servant Leadership Theory and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Systematic Literature Review  

*1st Place: Virginia Mullins, Polymer Sciences and Engineering Ph.D.

Structural Evolution of Polymer-Derived Ceramics  

2nd Place: Nick Enos, Polymer Sciences and Engineering Ph.D.

Poly (ether ketone ketone) Nanocomposite Crystallization Kinetics and Hoffman-Lauritzen Nucleation Transitions

*1st place: Swetha Nallapati, Epidemiology & Biostats MPH

A Multifaceted Exploration of the Influence of Dietary Patterns and Lifestyle Behaviors on Sleep Quality

*2nd place: Sonal Johal, Psychology (Clinical) Ph.D.

Early Life Abuse Corresponds to Worse Psychological Functioning Post-Diagnosis in Breast Cancer Patients

Mentor of the Year

Dr. Davin Wallace, associate professor, School of Ocean Science and Engineering

Research Assistant of the Year

Abdulsalam Adegoke, Biological Sciences Ph.D., School of Biological, Environmental, and Earth Sciences

Teaching Assistant of the Year

Emily Goldsmith, English (Creative Writing) Ph.D., School of Humanities

Learn more about the USM Graduate School at  website  or call 601.266.4639.

Categories: Graduate School Research

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Graduate College

Science of language.

Ashby Martin, a third-year doctoral student in the neuroscience program, didn’t always want to study the brain. Initially, he wanted to be a librarian. At a young age, he memorized his library card number and looked up to the librarians. “My favorite place to go was the library,” he said. “Librarians get to give people knowledge and resources all for free. They give everyone the same access.”  

Headshot of Ashby Martin

Buried in books, Martin found himself wanting to investigate things that were unknown; things that hadn’t been written down yet or even discovered, especially about the brain.   

This inclination led Martin to pursue neuroscience. Martin received his bachelor’s in neuroscience and behavior at the University of Notre Dame before joining Iowa’s doctoral program. The faculty, the connection to the hospital, and the foundational research that originated on campus were driving factors in his decision to come here. Martin specifically recalled Iowa’s psychological studies on patient S.M. (“The Woman with No Fear”) and meeting program director Dr. Dan Tranel.  

“That’s the past. [Tranel] is part of the present, and I could be part of the future. My research could be part of that future,” he says.  

Third-year doctoral student Ashby Martin. Photo provided by Ashby Martin.

Connecting through language  

At Iowa, Martin studies developmental neurolinguistics, particularly in young children who are bilingual in Spanish and English. His focus is on “numbers as language”, and he examines the neurological impact and visual representation of shifting between the individual’s multiple linguistic repertories through neurological imaging.   

One in three children under the age of eight speaks two languages. In Iowa, there are robust multilingual communities including West Liberty, Columbus Junction, and Amish populations who speak Pennsylvanian Dutch. As part of his studies, Martin has been able to connect with some of these multilingual communities in addition to participants in the Iowa City area.   

“Visually you can see the learning happening,” he says. “You can connect with people and share something local Iowans actually have . You can share effects that you see in their brains.”   

As someone who grew up speaking two languages, Martin has been able to use his Spanish to further connect with children who are involved in his studies and their parents. He noted that language barriers can impact a parent's involvement with their children’s activities , but being able to listen and respond to their questions in Spanish has bridged that gap.   

Martin notes that connecting with the parents has been a positive byproduct of this research. “Now there’s a parent who is not only engaged in research but is engaged with their kid in a new way that they maybe didn’t have access to before,” he describes. 

Martin leads a psychology and neuroscience station at a STEM event with students from West Liberty High School. Photo provided by Ashby Martin.

Expanding access to science  

One of the largest components of Martin’s research is the community impact. He recalls a story from Tranel, who also graduated from Notre Dame, about the implications of a university-required swim test. Despite its positive intentions, the test drew lines between students who had financial access to a pool and those who didn’t, emphasizing several considerations for research.   

“What is a good purpose? What is good execution? What is the back end of something that you are doing now, and how does it affect the local community?” Martin asks.

Martin leads a psychology and neuroscience station at a STEM event with students from West Liberty High School. Photo provided by Ashby Martin.

  Martin hopes that his work will shift people’s perspectives on language learning, especially modifying the mindset that one needs to achieve proficiency at an early age to learn a new language. Instead, Martin’s research emphasizes that developing a dual representation in the brain requires practice.   

Although he is only in his third year of his PhD, Martin hopes to eventually also publish in Spanish. One of his favorite parts of his work is addressing the lack of Spanish language representation in science by providing something that is normally only in English in Spanish. For Martin, this allows more people to be involved.  

With such a large emphasis on community engagement in his work, it’s no surprise that Martin can strike up a conversation with anyone over something as simple as the colors on a booth. For him, language is a common ground for developing connections with complete strangers.   

In the long-term, Martin hopes to bring his work to other countries outside of the United States to see if this dual representation presents in the same way across international multilingual populations. He describes this as seeing if it’s not just an “Iowa effect, but a human effect.”  

 For now, his team is focusing on bringing their technology out of the lab and into homes where language flows freely.  

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Applications Open for Students Exploring Academic Research Careers in Hematology Workshop

2024 search workshop.

Students Exploring Academic Research Careers in Hematology (SEARCH) is an interactive educational workshop for students to explore careers in biomedical research.

Apply Today

Undergraduate students, graduate students, medical students, doctoral students, and pharmacy students interested in a fulfilling medical and/or scientific career are encouraged to apply. 

To support the HTRS goal to build a skilled and diverse workforce in hemostasis and thrombosis, students from traditionally underrepresented racial or ethnic groups, disadvantaged backgrounds, or areas of the U.S. with acknowledged shortages of medical and research professionals are encouraged to apply.

During this workshop, you will:

  • Learn, ask questions, interact with like-minded peers, and have fun!
  • Explore career opportunities in biomedical research
  • Engage with experts ready to share their experiences in this growing field
  • Connect with mentors eager to lend support and encouragement
  • Tour Versiti's Blood Research Institute

Travel and lodging expenses for accepted applicants will be covered by HTRS.

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Elizabeth Tetu, trailblazing graduate of the Teacher Learning, Research & Practice program, has more to share with new teachers

Photograph of Elizabeth Tetu

“Feelings of overwhelm and failure, a sense of having been inadequately prepared, and a reported lack of support to navigate these experiences,” said Tetu. She also experienced “tensions between what I had learned and come to value through my early justice-centered teacher preparation as an undergraduate, and the practices and expectations in my school environments.”

It was these tense experiences that led Tetu to first apply to graduate school, where she was able to unearth the focus of what her research and teaching would ultimately be.

“Both my research and teaching have come to focus on supporting new teachers to find community and self-efficacy to support them to enact their values,” she said. 

With an abundance of opportunities to work with pre-service teachers in the Elementary Education program and the School of Education’s commitment to equity, inclusion, diversity and justice, Tetu was drawn to the research potential that the Teacher Learning, Research & Practice (TLRP) program offered. 

The TLRP program area offered Tetu a unique opportunity “to learn from/in a community of faculty and graduate students who care deeply AND theorize richly about teachers and teaching,” she said. “Being in community with peers and mentors who move with great authenticity and integrity has taught me ways of integrating my values and ways of being into my identity as a scholar.”

This integration of values that Tetu has learned to harness and utilize in her work were applied well in her time teaching in the Elementary Education program. 

“Elizabeth’s attention to equity and justice has been a hallmark of the courses she has designed and taught in the undergraduate Elementary Education program,” said her award nominators, Associate Professors Jamy Stillman and Melissa Braaten.

Gaining the respect and admiration of her faculty mentors, peers and students, Tetu was proudly nominated as the recipient of the 2024 PhD Outstanding Teaching Award. 

“Elizabeth’s concerted focus on teaching and teacher education — including her efforts to empirically explore questions about teaching/teacher education in the context of her own practice — have resulted in teaching excellence that far exceeds what is typical for doctoral students.” said Tetu’s nominators. “Elizabeth has excelled as a course instructor while making immeasurable contributions to the Elementary Teacher Education program through her teaching, course development, leadership, and scholarly activities.”

As the first graduate of the TLRP program, Tetu’s trailblazing contributions to the Elementary Education program during her doctoral program are only the beginning, and she is excited to be returning to the School of Education as an Assistant Teaching Professor at the end of this summer.

Before Tetu returns to the Elementary Education program, she has another important goal to accomplish in Europe this summer, hiking the famed Camino de Santiago.

In her own words

Please tell us a bit about yourself

I grew up and attended public schools in southeastern Pennsylvania, and I attended college/graduate school in NYC. I was an elementary school teacher and administrator for nine years in New York City. In my different roles, I saw (and experienced myself) some common themes in the first year of teaching: feelings of overwhelm and failure, a sense of having been inadequately prepared, and a reported lack of support to navigate these experiences. In my own early teaching career, I also experienced tensions between what I had learned and come to value through my early justice-centered teacher preparation as an undergraduate, and the practices and expectations in my school environments. This problem is what made me want to apply to graduate school, and ultimately both my research and teaching have come to focus on supporting new teachers to find community and self-efficacy to support them to enact their values. I chose CU Boulder for a few reasons: (1) the TLRP program area and the unique opportunity it offered to learn from/in a community of faculty and graduate students who care deeply AND theorize richly about teachers and teaching, (2) the school's commitments to equity, inclusion, diversity, and justice, and (3) the abundant opportunities available here to teach and work with pre-service teachers in the elementary education program."

What is one of the most significant lessons from your time at CU Boulder that you’ll carry with you into the next chapter of your life?

I came to graduate school with very little knowledge about the academy and learned very early on that there are strong pressures in academic spaces to produce rather than humanize, perform rather than listen, and achieve rather than learn. My time at CU Boulder, especially being in community with peers and mentors who move with great authenticity and integrity, has taught me ways of integrating my values and ways of being into my identity as a scholar. I feel that this integration is the only way to do justice-centered work and remain whole in the academy, and I'm grateful to everyone who has helped me to see that."

What is your best piece of advice for incoming students?

Doctoral education is full of difficult experiences: critically reflecting on your teaching, having conversations across infinite lines of difference, the big milestones (comps and dissertation) and so much more. Although these experiences contribute to a lot of individual growth and accomplishment, you in fact navigate them with peers and mentors. And there are SO many wonderful people teaching and working at CU Boulder. If I could give an incoming student one piece of advice, it would be to find people that you both respect and trust. Having the right people on your committees and collaborative teams can turn all of the challenges into precious gifts, as you are transformed by the expertise and generosity of others."

What are your next steps after graduation?

First, I'm going to take half the summer off to hike the Camino de Santiago! I see it as an opportunity to reconnect with myself before moving into the next phase of my career. In the fall, I am returning to CU Boulder as an Assistant Teaching Professor in Elementary Education."

Photograph Collage of Elizabeth Tetu with Family & Friends

  • Outstanding Graduate
  • 2024 Outstanding Graduates

Distinguished Graduate Student Award Winners Honored At 2024 Faculty Affairs Spring Award Ceremony

, l to r, Dr. Fuhui Tong, Tejaswini Ready, Porter S. Garner III, Dr. Timothy P. Scott

The Texas A&M Graduate and Professional School, in collaboration with The Association of Former Students, recently presented 16 Aggies with Distinguished Graduate Student Awards. This prestigious award recognizes outstanding contributions by graduate students in research or teaching. Generous contributions to The Association of Former Students’ Annual Fund have made these awards possible.

“Since 1965, The Association of Former Students has been proud to honor the very best of Texas A&M’s graduate students with the Distinguished Graduate Student Award,” said Porter Garner ’79, president and CEO of The Association of Former Students. “These exceptional Aggies have made an indelible contribution to Texas A&M and our world through their teaching and research across disciplines. They embody the Aggie Core Values and represent the Aggie Network with distinction.”

Dr. Fuhui Tong, interim associate provost and dean of the Graduate and Professional School, extended gratitude to The Association of Former Students and kudos to the awardees. “Thanks to The Association of Former Students for their support in helping us recognize this year’s Distinguished Graduate Students,” Tong said. “And congratulations to these outstanding students for making such a positive impact on our university and the world.“

Distinguished Graduate Student Award winners were honored at the Faculty Affairs Spring Award Ceremony on Friday, April 26. Each was presented with an engraved watch and a framed certificate.

Awards in Research

Rachel Busselman,  ecology and evolutionary biology, School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sarah Hamer

Sambandh Dhal,  computer engineering, College of Engineering Faculty Advisors: Dr. Stavros Kalafatis and Dr. Ulisses Braga-Neto

Wenliang He,  animal science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Faculty Advisor: Dr. Guoyao Wu

Nirmitee Sanjay Mulgaonkar,  biological and agricultural engineering, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Faculty Advisors: Dr. Sandun Fernando and Dr. Maria King

Tejaswini Reddy,  medical sciences, School of Medicine Faculty Advisors: Dr. Jenny Chang and Dr. David Huston

Kara Thomas,  biomedical sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Faculty Advisor: Dr. Michael Golding

James Tronolone,  biomedical engineering, College of Engineering Faculty Advisor: Dr. Abishek Jain

Ruida Zhou,  electrical engineering, College of Engineering Faculty Advisor: Dr. Chao Tian

Awards in Teaching

Nicholas Bradley,  communication, College of Arts and Sciences Faculty Advisor: Dr. Nathan Crick

Catherine Brooks,  anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences Faculty Advisor: Dr. Shelley Wachsmann

Abigail Clevenger,  biomedical engineering, College of Engineering Faculty Advisor: Dr. Shreya Raghavan

Delaney Couri,  communication, College of Arts and Sciences Faculty Advisor: Dr. Kristan Poirot

Carla M. A. de Loera,  entomology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Faculty Advisor: Dr. Hojun Song

Avi Kister,  chemical engineering, College of Engineering Faculty Advisor: Dr. Mahmoud El-Halwagi

Virginia Redwine Johnson,  curriculum and instruction, School of Education and Human Development Faculty Advisor: Dr. John Williams, III

Xiaoyu Su,  mathematics, College of Arts and Sciences Faculty Advisor: Dr. Guoliang Yu

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IMAGES

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  2. NCAA research grants awarded to four graduate students

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  3. Graduate Research // Bond Life Sciences Center

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  4. Growing graduate research

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  5. The 7th Annual Graduate Student Research Symposium

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  6. 2020 Graduate Research Poster Competition

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VIDEO

  1. 1. Introduction to Graduate Funding

  2. Job Application

  3. Job Application

  4. Transform Your Passions & Interests into Graduate Research

  5. Doing ML Research as a Graduate Student

  6. How to Gain Research Experience: For M.Sc & Passout Students

COMMENTS

  1. How to Conduct Responsible Research: A Guide for Graduate Students

    The advice focuses especially on graduate students but is appropriate for undergraduates and experienced researchers. The article begins with an overview of the responsible conduct of research, research misconduct, and ethical behavior in the scientific workplace. ... and publications are important for advancing in a research career. Many ...

  2. NSF 101: Graduate and postdoctoral researcher funding opportunities

    Graduate students can apply for this traineeship through their institutions, if available. These topics can range across the scientific spectrum. Current projects can be found by state. Research Experiences for Graduate Students Supplemental Funding These awards provide additional funding for graduate students with mentors who have an active ...

  3. Research

    Visiting Graduate Researchers. Visiting Graduate Researchers are domestic or international degree-seeking graduate students at their home institution who are invited to conduct short-term doctoral research or participate in a mentored or independent research project or master's research collaboration with a faculty member at UCLA. The initial ...

  4. Funding for Graduate Students

    The NSF Research Traineeship Program gives graduate students opportunities to develop the skills and knowledge needed to pursue a range of STEM careers. Graduate students funded by the program receive, at minimum, 12-month-long stipends that support their participation in the program's training activities, which can include courses, workshops ...

  5. Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program

    The Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program creates a pathway for you to advance your PhD thesis research while working at a Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratory, collaborating with world-class scientists, and using state-of-the-art facilities and cutting-edge scientific instrumentation. While maximizing the impact ...

  6. Advising Guide for Research Students : Graduate School

    Advising Guide for Research Students. Success as a graduate student is a shared responsibility between students and faculty. For research students, the relationship with your research advisor, also known as your special committee chair, is extremely important. Your responsibility to identify and choose an advisor is one of the most critical ...

  7. Graduate Student Research

    As a graduate student at Iowa State University, you'll play a pivotal role in our research mission, contributing to the creation of new knowledge and making a positive impact on the world. Collaborate with world-class faculty and utilize cutting-edge facilities to make groundbreaking discoveries. Research office.

  8. Graduate Research

    This hands-on research experience equips graduate students with the skills and expertise needed to make significant contributions to their chosen fields, while also fostering innovation and driving advancements across academic contexts. Our commitment to graduate research creates a vibrant and engaging environment where scholars can explore new ...

  9. Summer Research Programs

    In addition, students attend seminars given by nationally known scientists and workshops on career and graduate school preparation. At the end of the summer, students present their research results by writing an abstract and presenting their findings at a student research symposium. The program provides room, board, and a competitive stipend.

  10. Graduate Student Research

    Graduate Student Research. Elevating academic excellence and embracing a culture of creativity and discovery is a key strategic pillar for the University; our graduate students experience this every day. Our colleges and departments have outstanding research facilities and opportunities for conducting graduate-level research.

  11. Graduate Student Funding Opportunities

    Graduate Student Funding Opportunities (xlsx file; updated April 3, 2024) This is a continuously updated repository of federal and private funding opportunities that are intended for graduate students. The opportunities are pre-sorted chronologically and alphabetically, and can be searched by funding amount and subject matter.

  12. Research Statement : Graduate School

    The research statement (or statement of research interests) is a common component of academic job applications. It is a summary of your research accomplishments, current work, and future direction and potential of your work. The statement can discuss specific issues such as: The research statement should be technical, but should be intelligible ...

  13. graduate school

    1. A research student is one who is learning how to research by doing research under the supervision of a more senior academic. Of course, if you're not simultaneously a bachelor, Master, or PhD student, then you're not going to get any formal qualification out of it. - Moriarty. Jun 27, 2014 at 8:34.

  14. Using Graduate Student Research as an Effective Recruitment Tool

    Duke's MEMS department's recent research symposium served as a crucial platform for graduate students to present their work to an audience of would-be Blue Devils. The event proved instrumental in highlighting the interdisciplinary nature of the department, showcasing a selection of research presentations from current MEMS graduate students.

  15. Graduate Research

    Graduate Research Take the next step in your research journey. Monash is committed to providing the next generation research leaders with the skills and experiences required to push the frontiers of understanding to help solve global challenges of the age for the betterment of communities globally. - Professor Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis

  16. Graduate Student Researcher (GSR)

    GSR's are students who perform research related to the student's degree program in an academic department or research unit under the direction of a faculty member or authorized principal investigator. Graduate students may be employed during the academic year on a part-time basis that does not to exceed 50% time. These appointments are ...

  17. Graduate Research: Graduate School: Loyola University Chicago

    The Graduate School and the Graduate Student Advisory Council host an annual interdisciplinary research symposium on the Lake Shore Campus organized around the diverse research methods exhibited in scholarly work. The symposium is an excellent forum for Loyola graduate students to present their scholarly work.

  18. Student Research

    Student Research. Nothing beats real world experience. With a student-faculty ratio of 9:1, students work closely with faculty on exploring research opportunities in the lab, the local community and around the world. Many schools have funding programs to support student research so that research experience is accessible for all.

  19. Journal of Student Research

    Journal of Student Research (JSR) is an Academic, Multidisciplinary, and Faculty-reviewed Journal (Houston, Texas) devoted to the Rapid Dissemination of Current Research Published by High School Edition, Undergraduate and Graduate students. The journal seeks articles that are novel, integrative, and accessible to a broad audience, including an ...

  20. Key facts about U.S. college graduates

    Only 62% of students who start a degree or certificate program finish their program within six years, according to the most recent data from the National Student Clearinghouse, a nonprofit verification and research organization that tracked first-time college students who enrolled in fall 2015 with the intent of pursuing a degree or certificate ...

  21. Marine Energy Graduate Student Research Program

    You must be enrolled as a full-time doctoral graduate student at a qualified program requiring a research thesis/dissertation at an accredited U.S. college or university. If you are participating in an exchange program and attending a foreign institution, you must provide proof that you are enrolled in an accredited U.S. college or university ...

  22. Dear Colleague Letter: Non-Academic Research Internships for Graduate

    A one-page personal statement from the graduate student describing career goals, accomplishments, and how the activity will better prepare the individual to enter the workforce. Under supplementary documents provide the following: A resume of the graduate student (up to 2 pages) that contains (but not limited to) the following information:

  23. Graduate Student Research Grant Program

    Graduate Student Research Grant Program. Northeast SARE offers grants to graduate students to conduct research on topics specific to sustainable agriculture under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Proposals should address issues of current or potential importance to Northeast farmers, agricultural researchers, and farm support professionals ...

  24. NSF Graduate Student Mentoring Plans: Resources for PIs

    In this Research How-To event, Sarah Hokanson and Claire Cordella of BU's Research Development office will describe the new requirements, their implications for new NSF submissions or renewals, and the resources available to develop plans that meet federal requirements and support student mentees. RSVP NSF Graduate Student Mentoring Plans ...

  25. USM Graduate School holds annual Susan A. Siltanen Graduate Student

    The symposium is designed to highlight the innovative scholarship conducted by USM graduate students. Additionally, the 2024 Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year and Graduate Assistants of the Year award winners were announced at the Symposium Award luncheon. The 2024 Graduate Student Research Symposium Winners include: Oral Presentations: Arts ...

  26. The Science of Language: Neurolinguistic Research for Betterment of

    Expanding access to science . One of the largest components of Martin's research is the community impact. He recalls a story from Tranel, who also graduated from Notre Dame, about the implications of a university-required swim test.

  27. Graduate student wins Nominata Award for genetics research

    Graduate student Heankel Lyons' research made the cover of Cell last year for her discovery that floppy regions of proteins rely on a pattern of electrical charges to carry out their work in activating genes.. As she continues her studies to see how this system can be hijacked by cancer, her creative experiments and meticulous efforts have won her the 2024 Nominata Award, the highest honor ...

  28. Applications Open for Students Exploring Academic Research Careers in

    Students Exploring Academic Research Careers in Hematology (SEARCH) is an interactive educational workshop for students to explore careers in biomedical research. Apply Today. Undergraduate students, graduate students, medical students, doctoral students, and pharmacy students interested in a fulfilling medical and/or scientific career are ...

  29. Elizabeth Tetu, trailblazing graduate of the Teacher Learning, Research

    I chose CU Boulder for a few reasons: (1) the TLRP program area and the unique opportunity it offered to learn from/in a community of faculty and graduate students who care deeply AND theorize richly about teachers and teaching, (2) the school's commitments to equity, inclusion, diversity, and justice, and (3) the abundant opportunities ...

  30. Distinguished Graduate Student Award Winners Honored At 2024 Faculty

    This prestigious award recognizes outstanding contributions by graduate students in research or teaching. Generous contributions to The Association of Former Students' Annual Fund have made these awards possible. "Since 1965, The Association of Former Students has been proud to honor the very best of Texas A&M's graduate students with the ...