role assignment policies in exchange online

Stefanos Cloud

How to manage Microsoft 365 user role assignments and administrative units

  • Role assignments
  • Administrative Units

This article provides guidance on how to manage Microsoft 365 user role assignments and administrative units. The article is also available on my podcast and Youtube channel .

View this article as a how-to video on Youtube.

You need to manage existing user roles, create new custom user roles and assign users and groups to existing roles in Microsoft 365 . You need to also manage Microsoft 365 administrative units.

In this how-to article, we will show you how to manage Microsoft 365 user role assignments and administrative units.

Role assignments #

From within the Microsoft 365 Admin Center portal, you can assign ‎ Azure AD‎ built-in roles to users who need access to other admin centers and resources in ‎ Azure Active Directory‎, such as users, groups, and apps which use ‎Microsoft Graph‎ API. The following groups of user role assignments can be made from the Admin Center portal.

  • Azure AD role assignments
  • Exchange Online role assignments
  • Intune role assignments

role assignment policies in exchange online

In the next steps, we will show you how to assign the Global Administrator Azure AD role to a user and group. Follow the steps below to assign the Global Administrator role to a user or group.

  • Navigate to https://admin.microsoft.com and authenticate as a global admin user.
  • On the left pane, expand the "Roles" section and click on "Role assignments". On the main section click on the "Global Administrator" role. On the popup form on the right, you should be able to review the general properties of the role in question. On the permissions tab, the system lists details of the permissions which are assigned with the role in question.
  • On the "Assigned" tab, you can assign users or groups to the role in question. Click on "Add Users" and then "Add Groups" to add a user and group respectively to the specific role.
  • To run the Azure portal as a specific Azure AD user role, tick on the checkbox next to the role and click "Run As". This will show you the view of the Azure portal as if you had logged in via a user with the role in question.
  • To compare permissions of user roles, tick on two or more roles and then click on "Compare Roles". In the next screen, you should see a tabular comparison of the permissions assigned to each of the compared roles. You can also click on "Export comparison" to export the comparison matrix of the selected roles.

In the next steps, we will show you how to assign the Or gan ization Management Exchange Online role to a user and group, as well as how to create a new custom Exchange Online role. Follow the steps below.

  • Navigate to the "Exchange" tab under the "Role Assignments" section.
  • Click on the "Or gan ization Management" role. On the popup form on the right, you can review the general settings of the role under the "general" tab. Under the "Permissions" tab, you can review in detail the available permissions of the role in question.
  • Under the "Assigned" tab, you can assign a user or group to the role in question. Click "Add" and choose the user or group to assign to the role.
  • You can also create a custom Exchange Online role by ticking the checkbox next to the role which will be used as the template for the new role. Then click on "Copy role group". This will take you to a wizard to create your new custom role. On the "Set up the b asic s" page, fill-in the name, description and write scope of the new role and click Next.
  • Select the roles to add to the ‎new custom role group. Roles define the scope of the tasks that the members assigned to this role group have permission to manage.
  • Select the users to assign to this role group. They'll have permissions to manage the roles that you assigned in the previous step.
  • Review your selections and click Finish.

In the next steps, we will show you how to assign Intune roles. Assign ‎Intune‎ roles to specialists who need to view or manage ‎Intune‎ data, devices, or services. These roles can only be assigned to users who have a license that includes ‎Intune‎. Follow the steps below.

  • Under the "Role assignments" section, navigate to the "Intune" tab. If you need to export existing assignments, click on the "Export assignments" button.
  • Click on the Intune role you wish to edit assignments of. On the "General tab" you can review the general settings of the role in question. On the "Permissions" tab you can see in detail all permissions of the role in question.
  • To assign users to the Intune role, under the "Assigned" tab click on "Add". This will take you to the "Set up the b asic s" wizard. Fill-in a name and description and click Next.
  • Select the security groups that contain the users you want to become admins for the role. Click Next.
  • Select a built-in security group like 'All users', or search for and select security groups which contain the users and devices that the ‎Intune role can manage.
  • You can optionally add tabs which limit the specific Intune policies, apps and devices that the admins can see. Click "Next".
  • Review all your assignment settings and click "Finish".

Administrative Units #

Now we will move on to show you how to create and manage Microsoft 365 Administrative Units. Units let you sub-divide your or gan ization into any unit that you want, and then assign specific administrators that can only manage that unit. For example, you can assign the Helpdesk Administrator role to a regional support specialist, so they can manage users only in that region.

role assignment policies in exchange online

Carry out the following steps:

  • Under the "Roles" section, click on "Administrative Units". Click on "Add Unit" to add a new administrative unit.
  • Provide a name and Description of the new administrative unit and click "Next". Administrative units let you limit admins to manage users for a specific department, region, or any segment that your or gan ization defines. Start by giving the administrative unit a name and description that will let other admins know its purpose.
  • Choose "Add up to 20 users and groups" or "Upload users" if you need to bulk upload a large number of users to be linked to the new administrative unit. If you choose "Add up to 20 users and groups", then click on "Add Users" or "Add Groups" to add the desired users to the administrative unit and click Next. The administrators assigned to this unit will manage the settings for these users and groups. Adding groups doesn't add users to the unit, it lets the assigned admins manage group settings. You can only add up to ‎20‎ members individually or you can bulk upload up to ‎200‎ users. If you need to add more, you can edit this unit to add them.
  • Assign admins to scoped roles. The following roles are the only roles that support administrative units. Authentication Administrator Cloud Device Administrator Groups Administrator Helpdesk Administrator License Administrator Password Administrator SharePoint Administrator Teams Administrator Teams Device Administrator User Administrator.

Select a role and then assign admins to it. The admins that you assign to roles in this step will manage the members of this administrative unit.

  • Review your selections and click "Finish". The new administrative unit has been created. You can always edit its properties by clicking on the Administrative Unit name. From that page you can edit the administrative unit's members and role assignments.
  • You can also edit the name and description of an administrative unit by ticking the checkbox next to the administrative unit name and clicking on "Edit name and description".

What are your Feelings

Share this article :, how can we help.

Powered by BetterDocs

Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 183 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow , the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Q&A for work

Connect and share knowledge within a single location that is structured and easy to search.

How to enforce office 365 custom "role assignment policy" applied default to all new emails to be created?

I have created a RoleAssignmentPolicy called "DisabledForwardingRoleAssignmentPolicy" via Exchange admin center --permissions-- user roles .

enter image description here

I would like to apply "DisabledForwardingRoleAssignmentPolicy" default to all new emails accounts to be created.

In gui of Exchange admin center, there seems to be no way to do this. So I did this by longing to office 365 in powershell.

The command successfully executed. and when I verify it via Get-RoleAssignmentPolicy it says DisabledForwardingRoleAssignmentPolicy is default .

But when I create a new email and when i go to recipients --mailboxes-- select user and mailbox features--- Role assignment policy , still the default policy is applied.

enter image description here

I have to change it manually to DisabledForwardingRoleAssignmentPolicy

What I'm missing here? Please shade a light.

  • email-server
  • microsoft-office

user879's user avatar

You need to run "Set-MailboxPlan" cmdlet to change the default role assignment policy to the customize one.

First, run "get-mailboxplan" to confirm which plan your license is used, as below:

Then, run "Set-MailboxPlan" to change the RoleAssignmentPolciy to the customize one:

enter image description here

  • You are truly a great resource to serverfault. thanks a lot for your time testing it before posting. I was googling and no correct path was found. It worked. –  user879 May 30, 2018 at 5:21

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for browse other questions tagged email exchange email-server microsoft-office mailbox ..

  • The Overflow Blog
  • Would you board a plane safety-tested by GenAI?
  • Featured on Meta
  • Testing a new version of Stack Overflow Jobs
  • What deliverables would you like to see out of a working group?

Hot Network Questions

  • Why does Entropy Increase on mixing two ideal liquids
  • Extract result of Reap in a natural way no matter if it's empty
  • Have micrometeoroids been observed impacting the moon's surface?
  • Disable Vim folding for short files
  • How to approach a project with NDA in academic research
  • Problem using csvsimple package to customize a tabular
  • Altiplano distribution---Distributions very flat around the center?
  • File extension difference of 'charge-density' file created by remote servers and personal computers
  • Is this puzzle solvable? Choose 6 five-letter words to get maximum score
  • Should I care about my legacy?
  • Enigmatic picture of an axon
  • Exterior Antique Mortise Lock Jams - Modify?
  • In qgis field calculator copy everything from column after first - symbol
  • Use Tikzpicture instead of numbers in footnote
  • A client did an unannounced penetration test on our platform - is this legal?
  • My Use Case Diagram is a mess, what can i do?
  • Can Maglev trains ever reach escape velocity?
  • Keys and Locks Puzzle
  • Need to create a math symbol
  • How can I execute Lua code from a buffer?
  • Why would email transmission change the 6-char sequence "0rom "?
  • What is the cause of the re-emergence of premillennialism?
  • Can you use a coin to restore a health segment after you've reached 0?
  • Second opinion on PCB design for relay made in Altium

role assignment policies in exchange online

Subscribe for Practical 365 updates

Please turn off your ad blocker and refresh the page to subscribe.

You may withdraw your consent at any time. Please visit our Privacy Statement for additional information

Exchange Online

Application access policies in exchange online.

Avatar photo

Application Access Policies in Exchange Online  

The Microsoft Graph has been around for a while now and is slowly turning into the de-facto standard API for any Office 365 developer, including those focused on Exchange Online. Microsoft has already announced plans to stop any feature development for the EWS API and focus on the Graph instead. While EWS will continue working for the foreseeable future, going forward you will have to switch to the Graph, so understanding how to control it is vital. 

A n ot so short introduction to the Graph API  

Switching to the Graph comes with somewhat of a learning curve. It’s beyond the scope of the article to give you a complete introduction, but in order to better understand the examples shown here, you will be required to have at least a basic understanding of the concepts behind OAuth, OIDC, application registration, permission roles and scopes, consent, access tokens and so on. Microsoft has published extensive documentation on all these topics and  this article  is a good starting point. 

To give you the TL;DR version – the Graph allows you to perform various actions against different resources in Office 365, such as creating a message, deleting a file, or accessing a report. You can run those in the context of a given user, or as a background service. The authentication process is performed against the Microsoft Identity platform by means of obtaining  tokens , which are then presented to the workload against which you want to perform a given operation. For authentication to happen, the app must be recognized by the Microsoft Identity platform, in other words an  application registration  must be performed by the developer first. To control which actions a given application can perform, the developer describes the permissions needed by the app and you, or an admin in the tenant, has to grant (“ consent ” to) the permissions. 

Here lies one of the problems when using the Graph. As it tries to cover quite diverse set of resources, the permissions model used by the Graph doesn’t go into the peculiarities of each individual workload. Instead, the permission  scopes  introduced only cover the basic scenarios: access only your own resources, access resources shared with you, access all resources. For applications running in the scope of a given user, the so-called  delegated permissions  model, this is rarely a problem, as the workload can trim those permissions to cover just the resources the user has access to. For the so-called  application permissions  however, where the app runs without a signed in user, access is given to any and all resources. 

To give a specific example, the  Files.ReadWrite.All   delegated permission  will allow an application to perform all operations against all files a given user has access to. The permissions given to the user across SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business site collections will be honored, so the user cannot just go a bulk-delete all files in another person’s OneDrive, unless he has been explicitly granted access to it. On the other hand, the  Files.ReadWrite.All   application permission  will allow an application to perform all operations against all files in the tenant, period. While these permissions are only needed for a small set of operations and can only be granted by an administrator, every app out there can simply request them, and the fact that by default end users are allowed to add such apps to the directory doesn’t help either. In effect, it takes a single misplaced click to grant an app full access to all resources in your organization, and we have already seen bad actors exploiting this in Office 365. 

Restricting Graph API calls via Application Access Policies  

After this introduction, let’s talk about a cool new feature that allows us to mitigate threats and scope down the permissions given to only a subset of the mailboxes in our tenant. The feature is called  Application Access Policies  and, in a nutshell, represents a list of mailboxes a given application is allowed to run calls against. It is important to understand that this is a workload-specific feature, not a Graph one, the workload in question of course being Exchange Online. When Exchange Online receives a request to execute an operation from any of the Graph endpoints it exposes, the appID included as part of the access token, which in turn is included in the request headers, is checked against the Application Access Policies list and only allowed to execute against mailboxes included in the policy scope. 

Let’s dig into some specifics. Consider an app registration in Azure AD for  NewApp , to which I rather generously added the entire set of permissions available for Exchange Online, as illustrated on the screenshot below. Those include things like being able to access all items in all mailboxes in the tenant, change settings for any mailbox, being able to send messages as any user, etc. And since this is an  web app  type of application, it runs without a user context, and anyone that can run operations via this application will have practically unrestricted access to all mailboxes in the company, regardless of any roles he or she holds inside Office 365. 

Application access policies in Exchange Online

As an example of the things one can do with access to said application, here’s a PowerShell code snippet that gets a token for the  NewApp  application, then uses it to get a list of Inbox rules for one of the mailboxes in the company. The same example can be used against any mailbox thanks to the permissions granted on the app. 

Application access policies in Exchange Online

So how do we go about restricting this? As mentioned above, Applications Access Policies enforce a list of objects against which we can use a given application. For this specific example, we can configure an Application Access Policy that limits the  NewApp  application to just a subset of the mailboxes in the tenant, or similarly, prevents it from running against the most sensitive ones. Apart from the application identifier, we need to specify a group object, members of which will populate the restricted access list. Once we have all the needed information, we can run the  New- ApplicationAccessPolicy  cmdlet: 

Application access policies in Exchange Online

The moment the first policy is created, it becomes active almost immediately, as the restrictions are enforced directly at the Exchange layer. If we now try to run the same query against the Graph API, but for one of the mailboxes under the scope of the newly created policy, we would get the following: 

Application access policies in Exchange Online

The  (403) Forbidden  error can be generated due to variety of reasons, so if we want to be absolutely certain that the restrictions of the newly created policy apply, we will have to get the full server response. This is not as straightforward to do in PowerShell, but the following code snippet should help: 

Application access policies in Exchange Online

And there we have it – the “ Access to OData is disabled. ” error is thrown, as detailed in the  documentation . In effect, the “NewApp” application is now restricted and cannot act against any of the mailboxes that are members of the “USG” group we specified when creating the policy. This is because we used the  DenyAccess  value for the – AccessRights  parameter, which means that every request for accessing any of the members of the group will be denied. Alternatively, one can use  RestrictAccess , which is an  inclusion  type of policy – the API calls will only be allowed to run against mailboxes that are members of the group. 

Additional information about Application Access Policies  

Here’s probably the correct place to detail the rules of applying Application Restriction Policies: 

  • The   DenyAccess  action has priority over the  RestrictAccess  action. 
  • If a  DenyAccess  policy exists for given  Application  and  Target Mailbox  pair, the app’s access request is denied. 
  • If a  RestrictAccess  policy exists for given  Application  and  Target Mailbox  pair, the app’s access request is granted. 
  • If a  RestrictAccess  policies exists for given  Application , but does not match a  Target Mailbox , the app’s access request is denied. 
  • If none of the above conditions are met, then the application is granted access to the requested target mailbox. 

So, in a nutshell, for any given application you can create a policy with either a  DenyAccess  (exclusive filtering) action, or  RestrictAccess  (inclusive filtering), with the former having precedence. If a mailbox does not match any  restrict  policy, no restrictions are applied and thus the default level of access is not changed unless you create a policy. You can also create a policy with asterisk (“*”) used as the AppId – such  catch-al l  policy will apply to all applications trying to run API calls against Exchange Online and is a great feature to have.  

Let’s also look at the other cmdlets used for working with Application Restriction Policies. The  Get- ApplicationAccessPolicy  cmdlet can be used to list the policies configured in the tenant. As shown below, the Identity of each policy is constituted of the tenant identifier followed by the “\” char, the application id, a colon (“:”), the SID of the group, a semicolon (“;”) and the objectID of the group.  

Application access policies in Exchange Online

Although a  Set- ApplicationAccessPolicy  cmdlet exists, it can only be used to change the  Description  of a policy, so it’s mostly useless.  Remove- ApplicationAccessPolicy   can be used to delete any existing policies, and the  Test- ApplicationAccessPolicy   can be used to make sure the resultant set of policies configured for a given app will produce the desired outcome when applied to a given mailbox or group of mailboxes. 

Some issues and limitations  

Lastly, let’s also mention few issues you might run into when playing with application access policies. Despite what the documentation claims, you cannot use a regular DG or a dynamic DG for the – PolicyScopeGroupId  parameter, only  mail-enabled security groups  are accepted. It’s also unfortunate that you cannot disable a given policy, you have to remove it instead. Speaking of removal, the action will not prompt for confirmation, so make sure you know what you are doing. 

You might also experience some delays in applying the policies (about an hour), due to the caching mechanisms employed by Exchange Online for both the group membership and the policy objects. As the restrictions are applied at the Exchange server layer, obtaining a new token will not help speed things up, you have to wait for the policy changes to propagate. The  Test – ApplicationAccessPolicy   cmdlet will help you validate without having to wait. 

It’s also important to understand that not all API calls are currently covered, just the ones included in the following scopes: 

  • Mail.Read 
  • Mail.ReadWrite 
  • Mail.Send 
  • MailboxSettings.Read 
  • MailboxSettings.ReadWrite 
  • Calendars.Read 
  • Calendars.ReadWrite 
  • Contacts.Read 
  • Contacts.ReadWrite 

Probably the most important thing is that we cannot apply Application Access Policies against EWS impersonation granted as application permissions. This is unfortunate, as impersonation is one of the most powerful permissions you can have, especially when granted via application permissions (if granted via delegate permissions, we can control impersonation via RBAC scopes). 

Overall though, this functionality is a great addition to the service, and something that should have been included from the get go. Kudos to the Exchange team for providing these controls! 

About the Author

Avatar photo

Vasil Michev

Pingback: Microsoft Launches RBAC for Applications for Exchange Online

Pingback: How to Report Meeting Statistics for Room Mailboxes

Pingback: Moving on from Send-MailMessage: Sending Email from PowerShell using the Graph API

Pingback: Using Azure Automation to Detect and Report Microsoft 365 Audit Events

' src=

Hello Vasil , I have an important Question, Our company has been using the Application access policy for a while now ,and i get an error : “The total size of App Access Policies exceeded the limit of: 87040. Size 87062.” Can you provide a resolution for this.

' src=

Can I apply application access policy on a mail enabled security group synced from onprem?

' src=

If we scope the Application access Policy to specific mail enabled group and grant access only to the member of the group there are chances for any user id can be added to the group and leverge full access to the mailbox. What level of Security controls can be added to prevent this.

Create a group with closed membership, one that is managed by the IT support team and not end users.

' src=

any other way to restrict owner from adding users rather than group managed by IT team?

' src=

We are using Exchange online api with Application permission full acess .

Our objective is to restrict api permission to specific set users only .

Do you think there can be any way for that ?

' src=

FYI: the MS Exchange Team has enhanced Application Policy that can now be applied to Application permissions.

This is the source: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/exchange-team-blog/application-access-policy-support-in-ews/ba-p/2110361

I’ve tried and it’s working like a charm.

Thank you very much for this article.

' src=

Already covered here mate 🙂 https://www.practical365.com/blog/new-application-access-policies-extend-support-for-more-scenarios/

' src=

Is there a limit to how many such application access policy we can have in a tenant? also can we define more than one application in a policy if target group and scope are same?

' src=

I’m upgrading a system accessing Exchange calendar API using classic EWS access with impersonation to enumerate calendars and also create new appointments. To do so, I understand I am to create an app registration (The daemon app model) and make it request Calendar.Read.All and Calendar.ReadWrite.All permissions. So far, so good. You write however “we cannot apply Application Access Policies against EWS impersonation granted as application permissions”.

Does this mean, that the impersonation approach is unsupported?

Normally, I would request the Exchange admin to do the following:

New-ManagementScope -Name “My Impersonation Scope” -RecipientRestrictionFilter { RecipientTypeDetails -eq “RoomMailbox” }

New-ManagementRoleAssignment –Name “RoomSync-RoomImpersonation” –Role ApplicationImpersonation –User “[email protected]” –CustomRecipientWriteScope “My Impersonation Scope”

So if I have a DistributionGroup (room-list) and I cannot make a role-assignment for the application, how does that work? Do I automatically get to access calendars and roomlists without the need for “impersonation”? I ask, since no experts have so far seemed to answer this question clearly on other threads.

If you are using the application permission model for you app (daemon app), you get unrestricted access to impersonate all mailboxes in the company, and you cannot use Application access policies to restrict this. If you are using the delegate permissions model for your app, you need to assign the ApplicationImpersonation role to the user who will be getting an access token. Furthermore, you can create custom management scopes to restrict the impersonation access to specific objects only, or use the Application access policies to do the same.

' src=

I am trying to run the New-ApplicationAccessPolicy command in order to scope permissions for mailboxes. I completely followed the steps from links:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/exchange/exchange-online/connect-to-exchange-online-powershell/connect-to-exchange-online-powershell?view=exchange-ps and https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/graph/auth-limit-mailbox-access .

I connected to exchange successfully and i am able to run some of the commands, like Get-EXOMailbox or Get-Mailbox.But when i tried other commands like New-ApplicationAccessPolicy or Get-ApplicationAccessPolicy, i receive an error:

The term ‘New-ApplicationAccessPolicy’ is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program. Check the spelling of the name, or if a path was included, verify that the path is correct and try again.

Does it mean that i need additional modules to install and if yes, which ones. Please advice how to proceed.

Version of powershell is 5.1

Hey Elena, as replied on the TechNet thread, you need to have the necessary permissions in order to run these cmdlets (Organization Configuration role).

' src=

I have 15 email aliases on a mailbox. During the app authentication, will it ask for which email aliases that I can give access to. If so, can I give access to only two email aliases. Will I be able to get a different access token only for those two email aliases?. Or the access and refresh token is generated per mailbox

Answered over at the MTC

' src=

Hi, I ‘m accessing Exchange API through OAuth access token. However I has to select ‘full_access_as_app by using Exchange Web Services with full access to all mailboxes’ Can we restrict the scope of mailboxes in this scenario?

Best, Anurag

Ahem, did you read the full article?

“Probably the most important thing is that we cannot apply Application Access Policies against EWS impersonation granted as application permissions. This is unfortunate, as impersonation is one of the most powerful permissions you can have, especially when granted via application permissions (if granted via delegate permissions, we can control impersonation via RBAC scopes). “

' src=

Are you able to apply an application access policy scoped to just room mailboxes?

' src=

Nice write up. Thx! Seems a bit unsual that more granular controls are not possible at the graph API

Unfortunately the app policies are an “all or nothing” approach, you cannot granularly control which permissions are allowed. Microsoft is working on a “consent” role for Azure AD though, which might be just what we need in this regard. Though that’s just a hunch, as they havent really shared much details on it yet.

' src=

If I use the Catch-all rule to deny access, will that mean that new apps will be prevented access, and apps with more specific rules will work ? The problem we are trying to solve is that 3rd party Apps are doing things the users are not allowed to let them do, due to legal constraints. Say LinkedIn want to read contacts. But contacts is personal data, and giving a 3rd party access to the company contacts without a data processor agreement, article 30 document with risk assessment is at best a grayzone. Since everybody likely has the same issue, we are just trying to push to get this fixed, rather than having EU data authorities force us to shut down completely. Some 3rd party apps only processes data on the end user device, and are not a problem. Not sure with LinkedIn [We have users denying they gave the access to LinkedIn, but that is another issue, people do not see what they click], and Flow-e does processing on their servers and clearly needs a Data processing agreement before we can allow users to use that.

We want users to allow 3rd party apps to read their profile, for SSO, and nothing else. Everything else should be through admin approval. We need a global mask to apply to all user introduced apps, and need to be able to limit access granted to existing apps in users context.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Latest articles.

Practical 365 Approved! Don’t Miss These Groundbreaking Keynotes at TEC 2024 in Dallas

Practical 365 Approved! Don’t Miss These Groundbreaking Keynotes at TEC 2024 in Dallas

The TEC 2024 Keynotes will feature compelling sessions on identity, security, and the future of Windows. Delivered by speakers with strong opinions, these sessions are definitely not to be missed. Join the Practical365 crew at TEC 2024 in Dallas, Oct 1-2.

Practical Sentinel: A Practical Look at the Unified SecOps Experience

Practical Sentinel: A Practical Look at the Unified SecOps Experience

In this blog, we take a look at the Unified Security Operations Platform, review what is available right now, discuss what Microsoft is building, and ask whether you need this functionality.

Microsoft 365 Archive Could Help SharePoint Online Cope with Digital Debris

Microsoft 365 Archive Could Help SharePoint Online Cope with Digital Debris

Microsoft 365 Archive is a solution to move SharePoint Online sites from hot to cold (less expensive) storage. It works well, and it comes with an added benefit in that archived sites are inaccessible to Copilot. In other words, you can make sure that Copilot doesn't process old and obsolete material by archiving sites that contain this type of content. Seems like a no-brainer.

This browser is no longer supported.

Upgrade to Microsoft Edge to take advantage of the latest features, security updates, and technical support.

Role assignment policies in Exchange Online

  • 15 contributors

A role assignment policy is a collection of one or more end-user roles that enable users to manage their mailbox settings and distribution groups in Exchange Online. End-users roles are part of the role based access control (RBAC) permissions model in Exchange Online. You can assign different role assignment policies to different users to allow or prevent specific self-management features in Exchange Online.

In Exchange Online, a default role assignment policy named Default Role Assignment Policy is specified by the mailbox plan that's assigned to users when their account is licensed. For more information about mailbox plans, see Mailbox plans in Exchange Online .

Role assignment policies are how end-user roles (as opposed to management roles) are assigned to users in Exchange Online. There are several ways you can use role assignment policies to assign permissions to users:

New users :

  • Change the end-user roles that are assigned to the default role assignment policy.
  • Create a custom role assignment policy and set it as the default. Note that this method only affects mailboxes that you create without specifying a role assignment policy or assigning a license (the license specifies the mailbox plan, which specifies the role assignment policy).
  • Specify a custom role assignment policy in the mailbox plan. For more information, see Use Exchange Online PowerShell to modify mailbox plans .

Existing users :

  • Assign a different license to the user. This will apply the settings of the different mailbox plan, which specifies the role assignment policy to apply.
  • Manually assign a custom role assignment policy to mailboxes.

Role, role assignment policy, mailbox relationship.

The available end-user roles that you can assign to mailbox plans are described in the following table:

* This feature isn't available in all regions or organizations.

What do you need to know before you begin?

Estimated time to complete each procedure: less than 5 minutes.

The procedures in this topic require the Role Management RBAC role in Exchange Online. Typically, you get this permission via membership in the Organization Management role group (the Microsoft 365 or Office 365 Global administrator role). For more information, see Manage role groups in Exchange Online .

To open the Exchange admin center (EAC), see Exchange admin center in Exchange Online . To connect to Exchange Online PowerShell, see Connect to Exchange Online PowerShell .

Changes to permissions take effect after the user logs out and logs in again.

View roles assigned to a role assignment policy

Use the eac to view roles assigned to a role assignment policy.

In the EAC, click Roles > Admin roles . All of the role groups in your organization are listed here.

Select a role group. The details pane shows the Name , Description , and add the Permissions of the role group.

Use Exchange Online PowerShell to view roles assigned to a role assignment policy

To view the roles assigned to a role assignment policy, use the following syntax:

This example returns the roles that are assigned to the policy named Default Role Assignment Policy.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Get-ManagementRoleAssignment .

Note : To return a list of all available end-user roles, run the following command:

Add or remove roles from a role assignment policy

Use the eac to add or remove roles from a role assignment policy.

Edit button.

In the policy properties window that opens, do one of the following steps:

To add a role, select the check box next to the role.

To remove a role that's already assigned, clear the check box.

If you select a check box for a role that has child roles, the check boxes for the child roles are also selected. If you clear the check box of the parent role, the check boxes for the child roles are also cleared. You can select a child role by clearing the check box of the parent role and then selecting the individual child role.

When you're finished, click Save .

Use Exchange Online PowerShell to add roles to a role assignment policy

Adding a role to a role assignment policy creates a new role assignment with a unique name that's a combination of the names of the role and the role assignment policy.

To add roles to a role assignment policy, use the following syntax:

This example adds the role MyMailboxDelegation to the role assignment policy named Default Role Assignment Policy.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see New-ManagementRoleAssignment .

Use Exchange Online PowerShell to remove roles from a role assignment policy

Use the procedure from the Use Exchange Online PowerShell to view roles assigned to a role assignment policy section earlier in this topic to find the name of the role assignment for the role that you want to remove (it's a combination of the names of the role and the role assignment policy).

To remove the role from the role assignment policy, use this syntax:

This example removes the MyDistributionGroups role from the role assignment policy named Default Role Assignment Policy.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Remove-ManagementRoleAssignment .

Create role assignment policies

Use the eac to create role assignment policies.

In the EAC, go to Roles > Admin roles and then click Add role group .

In the Add role group window, click Set up the basics section, configure the following settings and click Next :

Name : Enter a unique name for the role group.

Description : Enter an optional description for the role group.

Select the roles that you want to assign to the policy.

In the Add permissions section, select the roles and click Next . Roles define the scope of the tasks that the members assigned to this role group have permission to manage.

In the Assign admins section, select the users to assign to this role group and click Next . They'll have permissions to manage the roles that you assigned.

In the Review role group and finish section, verify all the details, and then click Add role group .

Click Done .

Use Exchange Online PowerShell to create role assignment policies

To create a role assignment policy, use the following syntax:

This example creates a new role assignment policy named Contoso Contractors that include the specified end-user roles.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see New-RoleAssignmentPolicy .

Modify role assignment policies

You can use the EAC or Exchange PowerShell to Add or remove roles from a role assignment policy .

You can only use Exchange Online PowerShell to specify the default role assignment policy that's applied to new mailboxes that aren't assigned a license or a role assignment policy when they're created.

Otherwise, all you can do in the EAC or Exchange Online PowerShell is modify the name and description of the role assignment policy.

Use Exchange Online PowerShell to specify the default role assignment policy

To specify the default role assignment policy, use the following syntax:

This example configures Contoso Users as the default role assignment policy.

Note : The IsDefault switch is also available on the New-RoleAssignmentPolicy cmdlets.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Set-RoleAssignmentPolicy .

Remove role assignment policies

You can't remove the role assignment policy that's currently specified as the default. You first need to specify another role assignment policy as the default before you can delete the policy.

You can't remove a role assignment policy that's assigned to mailboxes. Use the procedures described in the Use Exchange Online PowerShell to modify role assignment policy assignments on mailboxes section to replace the role assignment policy that's assigned to mailboxes.

Use the EAC to remove role assignment policies

In the EAC, go to Roles > Admin roles .

Select the role group and click Delete .

Click Confirm in the confirmation window.

Use Exchange Online PowerShell to remove role assignment policies

To remove a role assignment policy, use the following syntax:

This example removes the role assignment policy named Contoso Managers.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Remove-RoleAssignmentPolicy .

View role assignment policy assignments on mailboxes

Use the eac to view role assignment policy assignments on mailboxes.

In the mailbox properties window that opens, click Mailbox features . The role assignment policy is shown in the Role assignment policy field.

Use Exchange Online PowerShell to view role assignment policy assignments on mailboxes

To see the role assignment policy assignment on a specific mailbox, use the following syntax:

This example returns the role assignment policy for the mailbox named Pedro Pizarro.

To return all mailboxes that have a specific role assignment policy assigned, use the following syntax:

This example returns all mailboxes that have the role assignment policy named Contoso Managers assigned.

Modify role assignment policy assignments on mailboxes

A mailbox can have only one role assignment policy assigned. The role assignment policy that you assign to the mailbox will replace the existing role assignment policy that's assigned.

Use the EAC to modify role assignment policy assignments on mailboxes

In the EAC, click Recipients > Mailboxes , and do one of the following steps:

Multiple mailboxes : Select multiple mailboxes of the same type (for example, User ) by selecting a mailbox, holding down the Shift key, and select another mailbox farther down in the list or by holding down the Ctrl key as you select each mailbox. In the details pane (that's now titled Bulk Edit ): click More options > click Update . In the Role Assignment Policy section, select the role assignment policy in the window that appears > click Save .

Use Exchange Online PowerShell to modify role assignment policy assignments on mailboxes

To change the role assignment policy assignment on a specific mailbox, use this syntax:

This example applies the role assignment policy named Contoso Managers to the mailbox named Pedro Pizarro.

To change the assignment for all mailboxes that have a specific role assignment policy assigned, use the following syntax:

This example changes the role assignment policy from Default Role Assignment Policy to Contoso Staff for all mailboxes that currently have Default Role Assignment Policy assigned.

Additional resources

All about Microsoft 365

ExO RBAC improvements #1: Limiting application access

Exchange has long been the prime example of a workload with granular and robust permissions model. Thus, it comes as no surprise that the Azure AD role-based access control (RBAC) model follows most of the principles introduced by Exchange. With all its customizability however, the RBAC model had some issues addressing the application permissions model introduced by the Graph API, where the service principal, under which the various operations were being executed, gains unscoped, directory-wide permissions.

To address such scenarios, Exchange Online introduced support for application access policies back in 2019. Later on, the EWS application permissions scenario was also addressed. Other workloads added their own implementations of similar controls, such as the Sites.Selected method for SharePoint Online and the resource-scoped consent model for Teams, to an extent. Yet, such implementations are not without their own issues, and in the case of Exchange certain limitations were quickly identified. So instead of making further investments in application access policies, Microsoft decided to bring the application experience as part of the existing Exchange RBAC model.

Meet Role Based Access Control for Applications in Exchange Online , currently in public preview. In a nutshell, the feature allows you to treat application access in a manner similar to how you assign user permissions. To that end, you need to decide on the set of permissions needed (the Management Role), the principal to grant them to (a Service principal object in this case) and the set of objects against said permissions will be valid (the Management Scope). The new bits here are support for service principal objects, i.e. the object representing an Azure AD integrated app within your directory, and the introduction of new, service principal specific management roles.

Incidentally, we’ve already covered all those new bits individually. At the time I wrote said article, management role assignment was not yet available for SP objects, but I speculated this will be coming in the future. And so, the time has come. For the time being, you will still need to manually create a matching service principal object for any application you plan to restrict access on, by means of using the New-ServicePrincipal cmdlet. Going forward, Microsoft is promising that this step will no longer be needed. Here’s an example on how to use the cmdlet. You will need to specify the client ID (application ID) value, via the – AppId  parameter, as well as the object ID, via the – ServiceId parameter:

If you do not know the values for said parameters, you can obtain them from either the Azure AD blade > App registrations > Overview page, or via PowerShell ( Get-MsolServicePrincipal ,  Get-AzureADServicePrincipal  or  Get-MgServicePrincipal  cmdlet, depending on which module you prefer). Do note that the  New-ServicePrincipal  does NOT validate the values, so make sure you double- and triple-check them.

The other part of the puzzle is the set of Management Roles you can assign. Microsoft has created a set of such roles, corresponding to the (most used) Graph API permissions. You can obtain a list of all supported roles by filtering them via the IsServicePrincipalRole value of True. Alternatively, you can look for all roles with the “Application” prefix. Do note that the list does not include all application permissions scopes available in the Graph!

After this introduction/refresher, how do we go about replacing an existing application access policy with a matching role assignment? The task boils down to determining the set of objects the application access policy was scoped to, creating a matching management scope and creating a management role assignment for the corresponding service principal. If you are not using application access policies but only interested in creating a management role assignment for a SP, just skip the next paragraph. The process remains the same, we simply need to provide the required information, instead of “borrowing” it from the properties of an existing application access policy.

Let’s start by looking at the application access policy details. The Identity property gives us the ClientID of the application, as well as the object to which it’s scoped. The only other bit of information we need is the type of policy, determined by the value of the AccessRight property.

We can use the New-ServicePrincipal cmdlet to create a matching object within ExODS (see example above).

Next, we need a management scope. Few notes are due here. With application access policies, the scope was either a single mailbox/mail user object or a set of objects, designated by their membership of a mail-enabled security group. Using “standard” Exchange management scopes, we have a lot more flexibility as you can use a variety of properties and operators to build the recipient filter. If you simply want to match the scope of the application access policy, use the MemberOfGroup property as follows:

where we’ve used the GUID obtained from the application access policy configuration. The Get-Recipient cmdlet can be used to “resolve” said GUID to the matching object within the directory, and after that we can leverage its DistinguishedName value to prepare the Recipient filter.

You might have noticed however that the application access policy was configured in “deny” mode, i.e. it was preventing the application from performing any operations against members of the specified group, while all other objects within the directory were valid targets. Thus, we need to amend our management scope query to exclude members of this group, i.e. use the “opposite” filter query:

Once you are satisfied with the set of object returned by the query, proceed with creating the matching management scope:

It’s worth mentioning that only direct members of the group will fall under the scope of the filter (or out of it, when we use the -ne operator). In other words, nested groups are not supported. You can however use regular distribution groups and Microsoft 365 Groups in addition to mail-enabled security groups. In addition, you can create a scope based on membership of an administrative unit, but we will cover this in another article.

With that, we have all the building blocks to create a management role assignment that will restrict access for the given application. We have an object representing the application and the set of objects against which access will be granted. The last thing to decide on is what permissions the app will get, in other words which Management role(s) to assign to it. While in the case of application access policies this was configured entirely on Azure AD side, with the extensions to the Exchange RBAC model you can control the set of permissions independently, by assigning one (or more) of the service principal roles we listed above.

The management role assignment is done by executing the New-ManagementRoleAssignment cmdlet. Use the newly introduced – App parameter to specify the service principal object and the – Role parameter to assign the corresponding management role. The – CustomResourceScope parameter is optional one and serves to designate the management scope, if you plan to use one. Without it, the newly created management role assignment will allow the application to act upon any object within the tenant. Combining those, we can now create the new role assignment:

In effect, we have mirrored the behavior of the existing application access policy, which restricted the given app to act on every object within the directory, excluding members of the specified group. In addition we’ve ensured that only specific Graph API operations can be executed, independent of any permissions the app has been granted on Azure AD side. If we want to provide the app with unrestricted access, we can create a management role assignment for the Application Exchange Full Access role instead and remove the management scope, if needed.

It’s worth clarifying that the Exchange RBAC permissions do not override application access policies, thus you need to carefully consider the settings you configure. What Microsoft suggests (and I concur with) is to remove the application access policy once a matching role assignment has been created. If both an application access policy and management role assignment are in effect for the same app, the resulting experience can be a bit confusing. In a nutshell, both sets of restrictions are applied in a logical OR configuration, as detailed in the official documentation .

Once the new role assignment is created, it’s worth running some additional checks to ensure everything is configured as it should be. The best approach would be to test the application itself, but Microsoft has also provided a new cmdlet that should help diagnose some issues, namely Test-ServicePrincipalAuthorization . You run the cmdlet by providing the id of the service principal you want to test, and optionally a resource to test against, such as a mailbox name. Here are some examples:

In summary, the Exchange Online’s RBAC model has been extended to cover some application-specific scenarios, by means of adding support for delegating management roles to service principal objects. Not only this approach unifies the application scenario with the existing RBAC controls, it also addresses the shortcomings of the application access policies feature, which was our only option to restrict application access until now, and adds some additional possibilities on top of it. While the feature is still in preview and there are some rough edges, Microsoft is already planning to address them, and most importantly provide an UI. And, unlike some of the recent announcements on Microsoft side, we’re getting all this for free, without requiring any add-on licenses or new SKUs. Amen.

One last thing before closing – you cannot use exclusive scopes for app permissions. Just in case I’ve neglected to answer some question, here’s a link to the official announcement , as well as the preview documentation . Next, we will look into assigning “regular” management roles to service principal objects, which allows us to limit CBA scenarios, as well as the added support for management scopes based on administrative units. Stay tuned!

5 thoughts on “ ExO RBAC improvements #1: Limiting application access ”

' src=

Many thanks for this>

My module does not know -RecipientAdministrativeUnitScope parameter. Any tips? Do I need a preview module perhaps?

' src=

As answered over email, -RecipientAdministrativeUnitScope is parameter for the New-ManagementRoleAssignment cmdlet, not New-ManagementScope.

  • Pingback: Limiting application access for Security and Compliance Center scenarios - Blog
  • Pingback: ExO RBAC improvements #3: Limiting access in CBA scenarios | Blog
  • Pingback: ExO RBAC improvements #2: Support for administrative units | Blog

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

This browser is no longer supported.

Upgrade to Microsoft Edge to take advantage of the latest features, security updates, and technical support.

Understanding management role assignment policies

  • 6 contributors

Applies to: Exchange Server 2013

A management role assignment policy is a collection of one or more end-user management roles that enables end users to manage their own Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 mailbox and distribution group configuration. Role assignment policies, which are part of the Role Based Access Control (RBAC) permissions model in Exchange 2013, enable you to control what specific mailbox and distribution group configuration settings your end users can modify. Different groups of users can have role assignment policies specialized to them.

This topic focuses on advanced RBAC functionality. If you want to manage basic Exchange 2013 permissions, such as using the Exchange admin center (EAC) to add and remove members to and from role groups, create and modify role groups, or create and modify role assignment policies, see Permissions .

For more information about RBAC, see Understanding Role Based Access Control .

Role assignment policy layers

The following list describes the layers that make up the role assignment policy model:

Mailbox : Mailboxes are assigned a single role assignment policy. When a mailbox is assigned a role assignment policy, the assignments between management roles and a role assignment policy are applied to the mailbox. This grants the mailbox all of the permissions provided by the management roles.

Management role assignment policy : The management role assignment policy is a special object in Exchange 2013. Users are associated with a role assignment policy when their mailboxes are created, or if you change the role assignment policy on a mailbox. This is also what you assign end-user management roles to. The combination of all the roles on a role assignment policy defines everything that the user can manage on his or her mailbox or distribution groups.

Management role assignment : A management role assignment is the link between a management role and a role assignment policy. Assigning a management role to a role assignment policy grants the ability to use the cmdlets and parameters defined in the management role. When you create a role assignment between a role assignment policy and a management role, you can't specify any scope. The scope applied by the assignment is based on the management role and is either Self or MyGAL . For more information, see Understanding management role assignments .

Management role : A management role is a container for a grouping of management role entries. Roles are used to define the specific tasks that a user can do with his or her mailbox or distribution groups. A management role entry is a cmdlet, script, or special permission that enables each specific task in a management role to be performed. You can only use end-user management roles with role assignment policies. For more information, see Understanding management roles .

Management role entry : Management role entries are the individual entries on a management role that determine what cmdlets and parameters are available to the management role and the role group. Each role entry consists of a single cmdlet and the parameters that can be accessed by the management role.

The following figure shows each of the role assignment policy layers in the preceding list and how each of the layers relates to the other.

Role Assignment Model Relationships.

For more information about management roles, role assignments, and scopes, see Understanding Role Based Access Control .

Default and explicit role assignment policies

The following sections describe the two types of role assignment policies in Exchange 2013.

Default role assignment policy

A default role assignment policy is one assigned to a mailbox when the mailbox is created or moved to a server running Exchange 2013, and a role assignment policy wasn't provided using the RoleAssignmentPolicy parameter on the New-Mailbox or Enable-Mailbox cmdlets.

Exchange 2013 includes a default role assignment policy that provides end users with the permissions most commonly used. You can change the default permissions on the default role assignment policy by adding or removing management roles to or from it.

If you want to replace the built-in default role assignment policy with your own default role assignment policy, you can use the Set-RoleAssignmentPolicy cmdlet to select a new default. When you do this, any new mailboxes are assigned the role assignment policy you specified by default if you don't explicitly specify a role assignment policy.

When you change the default role assignment policy, mailboxes assigned the default role assignment policy aren't automatically assigned the new default role assignment policy. If you want to update previously created mailboxes to use the role assignment policy you've set as default, you must use the Set-Mailbox cmdlet to do so.

Explicit Role Assignment Policy

An explicit role assignment policy is a policy that you assign to a mailbox manually using the RoleAssignmentPolicy parameter on the New-Mailbox , Set-Mailbox , or Enable-Mailbox cmdlets. When you assign an explicit role assignment policy, the new policy takes effect immediately and replaces the previously assigned explicit role assignment policy.

Using role assignment policies

Role assignment policies enable you to tailor permissions based on what business needs your users need to be able to configure. If the default role assignment policy meets your needs, you don't need to do any customization. However, if you have many different user groups with specialized needs, you can create role assignment policies for each of them.

The default role assignment policy you use should contain the permissions that apply to your broadest set of users. Then, create role assignment policies for each of your specialized user groups and tailor those role assignment policies to grant more or less restrictive permissions to them. When you organize your role assignment policies this way, you reduce complexity by only explicitly assigning role assignment policies to your specialized users while the majority of your users receive the more common permissions provided by the default role assignment policy.

A mailbox can have only one role assignment policy. All users, including administrators and specialist users, are assigned one role assignment policy. If you want a user to have a different set of permissions, you must assign that user's mailbox another role assignment policy with the required permissions.

Role assignment policy management

To add a new role assignment policy, you first create one and decide whether it should be the default role assignment policy. After you create a role assignment policy, you assign management roles to the role assignment policy, and then assign the role assignment policy to mailboxes. You can later choose to add or remove management roles or choose a different role assignment policy to be the default.

The following table lists the role assignment policy layer and the procedural topics that you can use to manage each layer.

Role assignment policy management topics

Additional resources.

IMAGES

  1. Permissions in Exchange Online

    role assignment policies in exchange online

  2. Role Based Access Control for Applications in Exchange Online

    role assignment policies in exchange online

  3. 55. Create and Manage User Role Assignment Policy in Exchange 2019

    role assignment policies in exchange online

  4. Exchange Server permissions, permissions Exchange Server, Exchange

    role assignment policies in exchange online

  5. Permissions in Exchange Online

    role assignment policies in exchange online

  6. Exchange Server permissions, permissions Exchange Server, Exchange

    role assignment policies in exchange online

VIDEO

  1. 22 Indirect Role Assignment

  2. GROUP ASSIGNMENT BA21103 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (ROLE PLAYING ) REGULATORY COMPLIANCE

  3. CBN policies driving exchange rate growth. #PolicyAnalysis #EconomicImpact

  4. #IFMS 3.0 Employee Joining and Reliving Status kaise check karein

  5. Simple & Secure Networking

  6. PHPRAD Tip 9 Cara admin memberikan hak akses ke user (Roles Assignment) yg udah terdaftar di app

COMMENTS

  1. Role assignment policies in Exchange Online

    A role assignment policy is a collection of one or more end-user roles that enable users to manage their mailbox settings and distribution groups in Exchange Online. End-users roles are part of the role based access control (RBAC) permissions model in Exchange Online. You can assign different role assignment policies to different users to allow ...

  2. Permissions in Exchange Online

    For more information, see Role assignment policies in Exchange Online. Role names that start or end with 'Application' are part of RBAC for Applications in Exchange Online. For more information, see Role Based Access Control for Applications in Exchange Online.

  3. Manage role assignment policies

    For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Set-RoleAssignmentPolicy.. Add a role to an assignment policy Use the EAC to add a role to an assignment policy. In the EAC, navigate to Permissions > User Roles.. Select the assignment policy you want to add one or more roles to, and then click Edit.. Select the check box next to the role or roles you want to add to the assignment policy.

  4. Public Preview: Exchange Online RBAC management in Microsoft Graph

    Exchange Online RBAC role assignments, role definitions, and management scopes are supported through this new API. With this preview, Exchange Online joins other RBAC systems in the Microsoft Graph Beta API, namely, Cloud PC, Intune, and Azure AD directory roles and entitlement management. How Unified RBAC for Exchange Online works.

  5. Exchange Online: Default Role Assignment Policy

    Get-ManagementRoleAssignment -RoleAssignee "Default Role Assignment Policy" | Format-Table Name,Role -Auto. And run the below CMD to remove the role. Remove-ManagementRoleAssignment -Identity "MyBaseOptions-DisableForwarding-Default Role Assignment Policy". Then compare your snipping tool and results from after removing the role.

  6. Announcing Public Preview of Role Based Access Control for Applications

    RBAC for Applications allows admins to grant permissions using a role assignment to an application that accesses Exchange Online data without user involvement. Admins can limit the data an application can access using a resource scope. This feature extends our current RBAC model and will replace the current Application Access Policy feature.

  7. Understanding Exchange Online's Role-Based Access Control model

    The Exchange Online Role-Based Access Control model consists of several different components: Roles, Role Groups, Role Entries and Role Assignments. To begin exploring, run the Get-ManagementRole cmdlet to see what management roles exist in the environment. The Get-ManagementRole cmdlet lists the management roles in the organization.

  8. Exchange Role Based Access Control: Management Roles

    The easiest way to create a custom role is by using the Exchange Admin Center. In the permissions section under admin roles, click the icon to create a new role group. Give the role group a meaningful name, and set the organizational unit that you want to limit the role group to. Next, click the icon to add a role.

  9. RBAC in Exchange Online

    Creating a new user role assignment policy. If your organization does decide to limit the self-management permissions of your users in Exchange Online, you have a couple of options. You can either modify the default role assignment policy, or you can create a new role assignment policy. Modifying the default role assignment policy is very easy.

  10. Office 365

    The "Default Role Assignment Policy" is assigned to every mailbox and " grants end users the permission to set their options in Outlook on the web and perform other self-administration tasks ". You'll find the policy in the Exchange Admin Center under "Permissions" and "User Roles".

  11. How to manage Microsoft 365 user role assignments and administrative units

    Follow the steps below to assign the Global Administrator role to a user or group. Navigate to https://admin.microsoft.com and authenticate as a global admin user. On the left pane, expand the "Roles" section and click on "Role assignments". On the main section click on the "Global Administrator" role.

  12. Get-RoleAssignmentPolicy (ExchangePowerShell)

    For more information about assignment policies, see Understanding management role assignment policies. You need to be assigned permissions before you can run this cmdlet. ... Exchange Online, Exchange Online Protection. This cmdlet is available in on-premises Exchange and in the cloud-based service. Some parameters and settings may be exclusive ...

  13. Microsoft Launches RBAC for Applications for Exchange Online

    RBAC for Applications Only for Exchange Online. On December 1, Microsoft launched the public preview of role-based access control (RBAC) for applications for Exchange Online. The new functionality extends the RBAC model introduced in Exchange 2010 to control access by Azure AD apps to Exchange data, or as Microsoft says, " resource-scoped ...

  14. exchange

    You need to run "Set-MailboxPlan" cmdlet to change the default role assignment policy to the customize one. First, run "get-mailboxplan" to confirm which plan your license is used, as below: Get-MailboxPlan |fl identity,RoleAssignmentPolicy Then, run "Set-MailboxPlan" to change the RoleAssignmentPolciy to the customize one:

  15. How to report on Exchange RBAC assignments

    As the name suggests, Exchange's Role-based Access Control (RBAC) permission model has management roles as its building blocks. A role represents a set of tasks or cmdlets, granted to a role assignee. The role assignee can be a user, a security group or a role group (or a role assignment policy, which we don't cover here).

  16. Create custom RBAC roles in Exchange and Office 365

    For example, we can create a management scope that applies only to shared mailboxes by using the New-ManagementScope command: New-ManagementScope -Name "Shared Mailbox Management" -RecipientRestrictionFilter {RecipientTypeDetails -eq "SharedMailbox"} When applied to a management group, the users in the group and the commands from the assigned ...

  17. 55. Create and Manage User Role Assignment Policy in Exchange 2019

    Microsoft Exchange 2019 Beginners Video Tutorials Series:This is a step by step guide on How to Create and Manage User Role Assignment Policy in Exchange Ser...

  18. Application access policies in Exchange Online

    The feature is called Application Access Policies and, in a nutshell, represents a list of mailboxes a given application is allowed to run calls against. It is important to understand that this is a workload-specific feature, not a Graph one, the workload in question of course being Exchange Online. When Exchange Online receives a request to ...

  19. Role assignment policies in Exchange Online

    Admins can learn about role assignment policies, and how to view, create, modify, remove, and assign them in Exchange Online.

  20. New-RoleAssignmentPolicy (ExchangePowerShell)

    First, the new assignment policy is created and set as the new default assignment policy. Because setting the new role assignment as default applies only to new mailboxes or mailboxes moved from previous versions of Exchange, the Set-Mailbox cmdlet is used to configure the new assignment policy on all existing mailboxes.

  21. Manage role assignment policies: Exchange 2013 Help

    In the EAC, navigate to Permissions > User Roles and then click Add . In the role assignment policy window, provide a name for the new assignment policy. Select the check box next to the role or roles you want to add to the assignment policy. You can select multiple roles, including end-user roles you've added.

  22. ExO RBAC improvements #1: Limiting application access

    If we want to provide the app with unrestricted access, we can create a management role assignment for the Application Exchange Full Access role instead and remove the management scope, if needed. It's worth clarifying that the Exchange RBAC permissions do not override application access policies, thus you need to carefully consider the ...

  23. Understanding management role assignment policies: Exchange 2013 Help

    A management role assignment policy is a collection of one or more end-user management roles that enables end users to manage their own Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 mailbox and distribution group configuration. Role assignment policies, which are part of the Role Based Access Control (RBAC) permissions model in Exchange 2013, enable you to ...