the presentation in the bible

Signed Scott Hahn Book, for Free!

Start your All-Access Membership 30-day free trial and get a free signed copy of Catholics in Exile , plus access to exclusive content from the St. Paul Center.

Get the Free Book

Get a Signed Scott Hahn Book for Free

the presentation in the bible

  • The Deeper Meaning of the Presentation in the Temple

By Clement Harrold

For many Catholics, the fourth joyful mystery—the Presentation of Jesus in the Temple—can be a difficult scene to meditate on. What’s the episode about, anyway? And what might be its deeper meaning?

Beginning with the first question, it’s important to remember that the Presentation described in Luke 2:22-38 is not the circumcision of Jesus. That already took place eight days after His birth. Rather, the Presentation took place in order to fulfill two different dictates of the Mosaic Law.

The first of these, drawn from Leviticus 12, mandated that mothers needed to be purified forty days after giving birth to a male child. This is why the Presentation is celebrated in the Church’s calendar on February 2nd—also known as “Candlemas,” an allusion to Simeon’s words about the boy Jesus being “a light for revelation to the Gentiles” (Lk 2:32)—because the event takes place forty days after the nativity (counting December 25 as day one).

In order to make the purification, the mother in question was required to sacrifice a lamb as well as either a pigeon or a turtledove. The law made provision, however, for those families who were too poor to afford a lamb, in which case they could sacrifice two pigeons or two turtledoves instead. St. Luke goes out of his way to inform the reader that this is exactly what the Holy Family did, thereby reminding us of their material poverty (see Lk 2:24).

The second precept of the Mosaic Law which Mary and Joseph were following is the requirement from Exodus 13:2 that all firstborns be consecrated to God in a special way. More specifically, this ritual rested on the understanding that the firstborn naturally belonged to God, and so the child’s human parents were expected to “redeem” (from the Latin redimō , meaning to “buy back”) their child by paying five shekels to the priest.

All of this helps us to see that the Presentation in the Temple was about two important things: (1) the purification of Mary and (2) the redemption of baby Jesus. So far so good. But there are two other elements here which are worth paying attention to. For one thing, the Mosaic Law nowhere demanded that the purification or the redemption take place within the Temple. This means that the Holy Family was being extra devout by going to the Temple for this special day.

Additionally, there is one detail in the Presentation narrative which is startling for its absence. While St. Luke does mention that Mary and Joseph bought the two turtledoves, he never takes the time to mention the paying of the five shekels to redeem baby Jesus. In other words, he cites the redeeming-of-the-firstborns precept laid down in Exodus 13:2, but he leaves out a description of this redemption taking place. Why might that be?

For the late Pope Benedict XVI, in his Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives , the answer was obvious. St. Luke leaves a literary silence in the passage in order to drive home the point that the infant Jesus belongs to His Heavenly Father:

Evidently Luke intends to say that instead of being “redeemed” and restored to his parents, this child was personally handed over to God in the Temple, given over completely to God. . . . Luke has nothing to say regarding the act of “redemption” prescribed by the law. In its place we find the exact opposite: the child is handed over to God, and from now on belongs to him completely. (p. 3)

Understanding this detail can help us bring the fourth joyful mystery to life in a new way. The Presentation isn’t just another boring religious ritual. On the contrary, it is a deeply symbolic moment pointing to Jesus’s divine identity, and to Mary and Joseph’s perfect cooperation with His divine mission.

Further Reading:

http://jimmyakin.com/how-the-accounts-of-jesus-childhood-fit-together

https://www.ncregister.com/blog/whats-happening-at-the-presentation-of-the-lord

Benedict XVI, Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives (Image, 2012)

Clement Harrold is a graduate student in theology at the University of Notre Dame. His writings have appeared in  First Things ,  Church Life Journal ,  Crisis Magazine , and the  Washington Examiner . He earned his bachelor's degree from Franciscan University of Steubenville in 2021.

You Might Also Like

Through the Year with Jesus

The liturgical year invites us to walk with Jesus through the most wonderful story ever told: the Gospel. In  Through the Year with Jesus: Gospel Readings and Reflections for Children , catechist and popular blogger Katherine Bogner reveals the rich mystery of the seasons we celebrate in the Church.

the presentation in the bible

  • If Catholics are Right about Mary, Why is She Talked About so Little in the Bible?
  • Do Dinosaurs Prove that Death Existed Before the Fall?
  • Was Abraham Reprehensible for Pretending that Sarah was His Sister?
  • Where Does the Bible Teach That the Holy Spirit is God?
  • What are 10 Things I Should Know About Ezekiel?
  • Why does God try to kill Moses in Exodus 4?
  • What is Hope and How is it Different from Faith?
  • Did Jesus Appear to the Disciples in Jerusalem or Galilee?
  • Did Jesus Really Descend into Hell?
  • What Does “The Day of The Lord” Refer to in Sacred Scripture?
  • Was Jesus’ Death the Most Painful Death in History?
  • Did St. Joseph Suspect Mary of Infidelity?
  • Did Judas Receive the Eucharist at the Last Supper?
  • Is Christ’s Blood Offered for Many or for All?
  • How Was Crucifixion Perceived in the Ancient World?
  • Why Does Jesus Praise the Unjust Steward?
  • Does God Ever Abandon Us?
  • Did the Demons Know Jesus was God?
  • Were Men and Women Equal in the Old Testament?
  • What Does It Mean to Be Created in God’s Image and Likeness?
  • When Were the Gospels Written?
  • What Does the Bible Teach about Making Time for Personal Prayer?
  • A Pro-Life Message for a Post-Roe World
  • Reformation-Era Problems
  • Perspicuity As A Protestant Bedrock?
  • The Great Adventure
  • Mission Possible: Helping Our Children Encounter Christ
  • Give God Permission
  • Finding Consolation in the Book of Revelation
  • Distinguishing Heresy from Schism
  • Queen Esther and the Feminine Genius
  • The Meaning of Human Friendship
  • The Mystery Hidden from Ages Past: Our Salvation in Christ
  • Change Is Difficult
  • Engagement Is a Time of Transition
  • The Communion of Saints
  • Trying to Avoid Suffering at the Cost of Mourning
  • God’s Loving Plan for Us
  • Images of Heaven
  • Raising Godly Adults in an Ungodly World
  • Infertility: Some Advice to Family and Friends on What Not to Say
  • Nurture Your Teen Toward Maturity
  • The Real Presence of the Risen Christ
  • Fulfillment of Human Persons in Relations
  • Theology: A Matter of Mind and Heart
  • The Beauty and Challenge of Christianity
  • The Body of Holiness
  • Becoming Holy, Becoming “Gods”
  • St. John Vianney Novena
  • An Act of Faith
  • What Is Beauty?
  • The Christian Gentleman
  • The Fisherman and the Pharisee
  • Should Christians “Mind Our Own Business”?
  • Are Man and Woman Interchangeable?
  • The Spousal Meaning of the Body
  • The Redemptive Call of Marriage
  • Embracing the Commitment of Marriage
  • Why Jesus Ascended into Heaven
  • The Sanctity of Marriage
  • If Christ Defeated Death, Why Do We Die?
  • Mary, Model for Mothers
  • Presiding in Love: Authority in God’s Eyes
  • Trust and Mercy
  • The Empty Tabernacle of Good Friday
  • A Priest's Perspective on Holy Thursday
  • From Triumphal Entry to the Cross: Did Jesus Really Think God Had Forsaken Him?
  • The Bible in the Liturgy and the Liturgy in the Bible
  • There Would Be No Scriptures without the Church
  • How Much Do You Know about the Sacraments?
  • Growing in Love of Neighbor
  • An Ash Wednesday Reflection
  • Why Church Teaching on Birth Control Won't Change
  • Society Must Uphold the Sanctity of Marriage
  • Upholding Church Tradition
  • Modern Ideologies and the Loss of Reality
  • Pro-Life Fast Facts
  • How to Celebrate Word of God Sunday
  • I Am Pro-Life Because: A 30-Second Defense
  • A Brief Guide to the Pro-Life Cause
  • What Wisdom Can We Gain from the Wise Men?
  • Mary's Role as Mother Glorifies Her Son
  • Why We Read the Genealogy of Jesus at Christmas Eve
  • Blessed Are You Among Women: The Fourth Sunday of Advent
  • The Healing Power of the Eucharist
  • Finding God in Silence
  • Living the Faith at Home
  • The Power of Celibacy in the Priesthood
  • The Scandal of the Crusades?
  • Memento Mori for Kids
  • Five Ways to Defend Yourself Against Evil
  • Don't Fall for Misguided Spirituality this Halloween
  • Reclaiming True Marital Intimacy
  • The World of the Occult
  • Get Ready for the New Liturgical Year! How Well Do You Know Luke?
  • Why Study Apologetics?
  • Why Catholics Stopped Going to Mass after Vatican II: Setting the Record Straight
  • Are We Afraid to Get Too Close to God?
  • Genesis to Jesus Quiz
  • Transgenderism: Answering Common Objections to Church Teaching
  • St. Faustina on Trust
  • St. Augustine on Christian Friendship
  • Jesus Refuses to Believe You When You Say You're Not Worthy of Love
  • Look to Mary
  • Aquinas' Advice for Sorrow and Anxiety
  • Focus on the Duty of the Moment
  • Luther and the Separation of the Laity from Knowledge of Scripture
  • The Gods of the Digital Revolution Won’t Share Space with Followers of the Lord God
  • How Much Do You Know about the Mass?
  • A Crisis of Friendship
  • Can Stuff Make Us Happy?
  • How Do We Love Our Enemies?
  • Don't Fall for Politicizing the Bible
  • Quiz for the Feast of Corpus Christi
  • The Bible and the Church Fathers Quiz
  • Mary: The Promised Mother
  • Authentic Authority: the Joseph Option
  • A Mother's Guide to Confession
  • The Bible and the Virgin Mary Quiz
  • A Mother’s Guide to the Eucharist
  • St. Joseph the Worker is the Saint for the Everyday
  • The Sacraments: God's Masterworks
  • Making Our House a Home
  • Celebrate the Season of Easter with Your Family
  • Understanding the Holy Triduum
  • Everything You Want to Know about Lent Explained
  • Now is the Time of St. Joseph: How to Grow in Relationship with Him
  • Love Extravagant: Jesus on the Cross
  • Where Is the Mass in the Bible?
  • Call No Man Father? What Jesus Meant
  • Help Children Enter into Lent
  • Go Deeper in the Mass This Lent
  • Genesis on Gender and the Covenant of Marriage
  • Recovering Strong Teaching on the Priesthood
  • Is the Priesthood Biblical?
  • Give Yourself a Break from News and Noise
  • Novena to St. Paul
  • Highlights from the 2021 January Priest Conference
  • How the Laity Can Help Renew the Church
  • 3 Steps to Build Eucharistic Devotion in the New Year
  • Lectio Divina: A Guide to Praying with Scripture
  • What Is Our Worth?
  • A Christmas Prayer
  • God Created You for a Purpose
  • Why Is John the Baptist Important During Advent?
  • How to Become a More Grateful Person
  • Give Thanks in All Circumstances
  • Having Fun Is Spiritually Powerful
  • Secular Society Is Worshiping Something, and It’s Not Christ
  • You. Want. Joy.
  • Discernment: Tips for Teens
  • It’s Time to Stand Up for Truth and Morals in Politics
  • What Does Religion Have to Do with Politics?
  • Confusion in the Church
  • A Checklist for Spiritual Battle
  • The Devil's Lies Are Subtle
  • Scripture Is a Love Letter: How to Read It
  • Kimberly Hahn's New Ministry for Women
  • Is Satan a Myth?
  • We Must Not Be Lukewarm
  • Exorcism and the Battle Against the Devil
  • Unmasking Satan in Cultural Revolutions
  • A Church in Crisis
  • Created for Sonship
  • What Does the Bible Say about Angels?
  • Announcing the Brand New St. Paul Center App!
  • Only in Jesus: God’s Personal Invitation
  • To Stand with Christ and Defend the Faith
  • Where Is Mary's Assumption in the Bible?
  • Mid-August Feast: Celebrating the Assumption
  • The Problems of the Modern View of Faith
  • How Do We Have a Personal Relationship with Jesus?
  • You Can't Handle Suffering without the Mass
  • Sunday Mass and Religious Freedom: A Bishop's Defense
  • Stronger Together: Highlights from the 2020 Priest Conference East
  • How Do You Explain Why You Believe in God?
  • Why Is God Eternal?
  • Good News and Special Thanks
  • Supporting Priests in Person and Virtually
  • You Can Trust God's Goodness
  • God’s Plans Are Better Than Ours
  • Marriage and Family vs the Diabolical
  • Our Father: Understanding the Fatherhood of God
  • The Church's Eucharistic Mission
  • Congratulating Jeremiah Hahn on His Diaconate Ordination!
  • A Pure Sacrifice: Why the Mass Isn’t Just Symbolic
  • Why Catholics Need Eucharistic Adoration
  • The Profound Love of the Eucharist
  • Church Teaching on the Real Presence
  • Why We Shouldn't Forget about Pentecost
  • The Importance of Matthias Scheeben to Catholic Scholarship
  • Why We Pray for the Dead
  • Death Is Not the End
  • The Eucharist and the Resurrection of the Body
  • Our Body is Not a Burden or a Barrier: It’s a Bridge
  • What to Do After Lent: Practical Tips from the Church Fathers
  • Easter and the Resurrection of the Body
  • Historical Questions about the Resurrection of Jesus
  • A Holy Week Message: Hope in the Face of Death
  • We Were Born to Die, but We Were Created to Live
  • Preparing for Death
  • What Mary’s Yes Means for Us
  • What Happens When We Die?
  • We Need to be Shaken Up by the Stations of the Cross
  • St. Joseph: A Model for Priests
  • Don't Forget to Celebrate
  • The Meaning of Lent
  • Pursuing Holiness with the Saints
  • Raising Truthful Children
  • Why Should We Care about the Church Fathers?
  • Who is St. Perpetua?
  • Passing Down the Faith to the Next Generation
  • What Can Children Do for Lent?
  • The Bible and the Church Fathers Launch
  • The Meaning Behind Ash Wednesday and Forty Days
  • Sneak Peek of The Bible and the Church Fathers
  • Seeking God in Darkness
  • Prayer to St. Conrad of Piacenza
  • Reading the Bible with the Church Fathers
  • Called to Holiness
  • Finding Profound Love in Eucharistic Adoration
  • Do We Take the Bible Literally?
  • We Can’t Pray without God
  • Am I Really Praying?: Dealing with Distraction
  • Benedict XVI on Authentic Reform
  • Provisions for the Journey
  • How the Church Fathers Helped Me Read the Bible
  • How to Embrace Mystery
  • Do Catholics Read the Bible?
  • Is the Bible Just Literature?
  • 7 Ideas for Celebrating the Word of God in the New Year
  • Highlights from the 2020 Priest Conference West
  • The Role of Silence in a Life of Faith
  • The Bible and the Fathers
  • A Star Shall Come Forth Out of Jacob: Celebrating the Epiphany
  • Mother and Queen
  • Christian Marriage and Divine Love
  • Jesus and the Holy Innocents: The New Testament and the Old
  • Our Year in Review
  • Why We Give Gifts: Gratitude for the Greatest Gift of All
  • Why We Read the Genealogy of Jesus
  • Son of God, Son of Mary
  • The First Prophecy of the Messiah
  • The Importance of Christian Story-Telling to Children
  • Three Things to Ask Ourselves As We Prepare for Christmas
  • Is Santa a Lie?
  • The Story Behind "The Attic Saint"
  • What We Often Forget about the Holy Family
  • Why Do We Call Mary the Mother of God?
  • Don't Skip the Advent Traditions
  • Preparing for the Guest Who Will Change Your Life
  • A Biblical Defense of the Immaculate Conception
  • Blessed Among Women: Contemplating the Visitation
  • Preparing to Meet Jesus at the End of the World
  • What the Bible Says about the Mass
  • Is Matthew the Most Important Gospel?
  • A Gift for My Savior: Entering Into Advent
  • St. Andrew Christmas Novena
  • Here's to Feasting
  • No Bake Cashew and Salted Caramel Ice Cream Cake
  • Show Hospitality, No Need to Entertain
  • Should Catholics Feast?
  • Favorite Thanksgiving Side Dishes
  • What Is Moral Therapeutic Deism and Why Does it Fail?
  • How to Read a Gospel: The Story of Matthew
  • Why Twelve?: The Apostles and the New Israel
  • Roasted Potato, Bacon, and Kale Salad
  • Building the Kingdom: The Mission of Jesus
  • What Modernism Gets Wrong about the Body
  • Theology of the Body Beyond the Bedroom
  • The Incredible Unity of the Mass
  • How Do I Know If I Have a Vocation?: Guidance in Confusion
  • Advice for Women Discerning Religious Life
  • Augustine on the Eucharist
  • The Lost Prophecy of the Eucharist
  • Letting Go of Affection for Sin
  • What the Bible Says about Spiritual Warfare
  • Sixth Annual Gala (2019) Highlights
  • The Devil Is Real: Combating Spiritualism
  • The Truth about Exorcism
  • Cultivating Silence
  • Christ Is Still Present in the Church
  • Fully Human and Fully Divine: Understanding the Incarnation
  • Why Catholics Go to Confession
  • How Is the Eucharist Both Food and Sacrifice?
  • Why Christians Should Keep Caring for the Sick
  • Modern Medicine is Based on Christianity
  • How to Feast and Fast with the Church
  • Does Contraception Violate the Natural Law?
  • Debunking the Myths Against Big Families
  • Understanding Mary as Queen Mother
  • True Devotion to Mary: Avoiding Two Extremes
  • How I Embraced Mary as Mother
  • Do Our Lives Reflect that We Receive Jesus?
  • A Short History of the Rosary
  • Mass In Vain: On Not Violating the Second Commandment at Mass
  • The Biblical Foundations of the Priesthood
  • Celibacy is a Paradox, but a Joyful One
  • How to Foster Eucharistic Adoration
  • When Do We Have to Obey the Pope?
  • Grace at the Heart of Grief
  • Understanding Vatican II and the One Church of Christ
  • Genesis and Evolution
  • We Don’t Need to Prove God Is Good
  • Where Do We Find Church Teaching on the Real Presence?
  • Giving Children the Gift of Our Time
  • What Happens When We Put Our Phones Down
  • What Does It Mean to Know Someone?
  • What Is a Vocation?
  • “Jesus Loves You” Sounds Meaningless to a Skeptic: The Problem of Apologetics
  • 8 Habits That Will Give You a Better Sunday
  • An Introduction to the Types of Prayer
  • Where Did We Get the Bible?
  • Scott Hahn on the Latest Pew Research Center Poll
  • The Logic of Gift and the Vocation of Work
  • Making Work Meaningful: Three Questions to Ask Ourselves
  • The Power of Sunday
  • The False Promises of Entertainment
  • The Divided Life
  • What Are the Precepts of the Church?
  • Jesus Will Help Carry Your Cross
  • Take Up and Read: St. Augustine, the Bible, and the Church Fathers
  • Why Do We Have Original Sin if We Didn’t Eat the Apple?
  • Word and Presence: On the Importance of the Liturgy of the Word
  • Prayer: the Root of the Spiritual Life
  • To Serve is to Reign: Mary's Queenship and the Cross
  • How to Read the Acts of the Apostles
  • Is Celibacy Biblical?
  • The Lost Tribes of Israel and the Book of Revelation
  • What Is Virtue?
  • Is Mary’s Assumption in the Bible?
  • Reading with Love: Tips for Sharing Spiritual Books with Children
  • Scripture Study and Eucharistic Amazement
  • The Sacraments: Chisels in the Hands of Christ
  • Why the Eucharist Gives Us the Grace to Avoid Sin
  • How God Acts in Our Lives
  • In the Order of Melchizedek
  • In the Beginning, God Made . . . the Sacraments?
  • Is Priestly Ordination in the New Testament?
  • St. John Vianney Novena for Priests
  • Highlights from the 2019 Priest Conference East
  • Discerning Our True Desires
  • The Importance of Supporting Families
  • Commissioned to Preach, Teach, and Baptize All Nations
  • Jesus as High Priest: the Significance of the Seamless Robe
  • Did You Know You’re a Priest?: the Common Priesthood of the Faithful
  • Why We Have a Pope: Defending Papal Succession with Scripture
  • St. Joseph: the Model of Supernatural Fatherhood
  • The Urgency of Lay Evangelization and the Role of the Priest
  • Why Can’t Catholic Priests Get Married?: A Short Defense of the Celibate Fatherhood
  • A Priest Answers: Yes, a Celibate Life Can Be Filled with Love
  • Should Priestly Celibacy Be Optional?
  • Why We Call Priests "Father"
  • Why Are Catholic Priests Celibate?
  • A Prayer for Government by the First American Bishop
  • God Doesn’t Play Poker: Trusting God and Accepting Your True Call
  • Why We Should Be Proud to Be Catholic
  • The Equality of Men and Women in the Church
  • The Radical Call of the Sermon on the Mount
  • Mary: the Model of Feminine Authority
  • More than Meets the Eye: John the Baptist
  • Why Don't We Have Women Priests?
  • What Replaces Christianity in a “Post-Christian World”?
  • Logos, Brands, and Celebrity: the Religion of the Age
  • Reason and Revelation
  • The Best Books in Our Warehouse
  • Beauty: the Remedy to a Culture Gone Numb
  • God Invites Us to Call Him by Name
  • God Never Leads Us into Temptation
  • Learning Perfect Virtue from Jesus in the Eucharist
  • Yes, There's a Connection Between Hugging Trees and Keeping the Commandments
  • Was There a Time Before Church and State?
  • A Break with Human Nature: How We Lost Touch with Ourselves
  • In Mastering Nature, We’ve Let Screens Master Us
  • Nature Invites Us to Know God
  • The Eclipse of Nature: How to Recover Natural Wonder in a Screen-Dominated World
  • Creation as Sacrament
  • Blessed Among Women
  • Jesus Reigns in Glory: the Ascension
  • How to Read the Book of Revelation
  • Read the Book of Revelation for Your Daily Dose of Hope
  • Celebrating the Virtue of Loyalty
  • All Things in Moderation: Balancing Work and Personal Life
  • A Lesson on Vocation from John Paul II
  • How a Pope and a President Changed History
  • Challenging Students to Understand the Faith Is Not Only Good, It's Necessary
  • Morality: More Than Just "No"
  • An Introduction to the Sacraments
  • What Is Ecclesiology?: An Introduction
  • Why the Paschal Mystery?
  • An Introduction to Christology
  • A New Series for Systematic Study of the Faith
  • How Do We Know Who God Is?
  • Desiring God Is a Gift from God
  • Lessons Learned from Nazareth
  • Mary's Saving Motherhood
  • Mary: God's Masterwork
  • Honoring Mary, Imitating Christ
  • Introducing a New Podcast from Scott Hahn and the St. Paul Center
  • Do We Need Friends?: Friendship and Following Christ
  • Called to Be Children of Mary
  • Why Can't We Get Enough Superheroes?: Our Need for Adventure
  • The Psalms: Music for Our Hearts
  • A Venture of Faith
  • The Lord Is Risen: Contemplating the Resurrection
  • Our Journey with Journey Through Scripture
  • Three Books to Read for a Joyful Easter
  • Emmaus Day: Behind the Traditional Name for Easter Monday
  • The Fourth Cup: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Paschal Mystery
  • Victim and Priest: Christ’s Sacrifice in the Eucharist
  • Advice for Overcoming Temptation from the Doctors of the Church
  • The Gifts of Confirmation
  • A Priest Explains the Signs and Symbols of the Mass
  • When John Henry Newman Met the Church Fathers
  • The Paschal Mystery: The Source and Power of the Sacred Liturgy
  • Who Are the Fathers of the Church and Why Should We Care?
  • Understanding the Sacrament of Confirmation
  • A Defense of Believing in the Bible: Why the Church Teaches the Bible is Inerrant
  • The Eucharist Book Review: Revealing Beauty through the Intellect
  • What Does Your Priest Want for Easter?
  • The Passover, Calvary, and the Mass
  • Called to Be Fully Alive
  • Being Pro-Life Is Standing with the Rejected Christ
  • The Great Commission of Matthew 28
  • Understanding the Annunciation
  • Mother of the Living: Eve and the Fall
  • How to Give Back to Our Priests for Lent
  • Story of a Stole: Finding the Priesthood in the Modern Age
  • St. Joseph: Noble Lover, Contemplator of Beauty
  • What’s the Difference Between a Catholic and a Roman Soldier?
  • The Man Behind Two of the Twentieth Century’s Greatest Theologians
  • A Defense of Difficult Questions
  • Understanding the Spiritual Sense of the Bible
  • Moral Atheism?: What Morality Looks Like without God
  • First Friday of Lent Vegetable Bowls
  • What We're Reading for Lent
  • Jesus Read Scripture: How We Can Follow Our Lord’s Example This Lent
  • From Servanthood to Sonship: What the “Our Father” Teaches Us about Covenant
  • Centering Our Lives on Christ: Wisdom from the Holy Family
  • Christ Became a Child to Show Us How to Be Sons and Daughters of God
  • Learning from the Holy Family
  • What to Bake for Bible Study
  • The ABC's of Hospitality
  • Tips for Hosting a Bible Study
  • Share the Gospel with a Bible Study
  • It Is Not Good for Man to Be Alone: Called to Communion
  • Surprised by Love
  • Six Things to Do Before Lent
  • The Seventh Day: Created for Sonship
  • It's Not Too Early to Think about Easter
  • Hospitals without Hospitality?: the State of Medicine in a Post-Christian World
  • Understanding "Hallowed Be Thy Name"
  • Salvation History: the Plot of the Bible
  • What Happens When Words Have No Meaning
  • The Power of Silence
  • The Apologist of Apologetics
  • Catholic Ecology: Living According to One's Dignity
  • What Is Social Justice without Personal Virtue?
  • The Art of Memory in Thomas Aquinas
  • Inaugural West Coast Priest Conference Exceeded All Hopes, Serves New Group of Priests
  • Everyday Holiness: The Wisdom of St. Francis de Sales
  • Drinking from the Font of Mercy
  • An Invitation to Life: the Heart of Humanae Vitae
  • Detachment: Growing in Freedom
  • The Pursuit of Happiness and the Ten Commandments
  • Walking the Walk: A Guide for the Pilgrim Church on Earth
  • Facing Trials with Christ, Grace, and . . . The Lord of the Rings
  • The Return to Virtue
  • Reclaiming the Excellence of Virtue
  • The Adoration of the Magi
  • Come Again?: The Eucharist and the Fulfillment of the Kingdom
  • The Burning Bush: Theotókos in the Old Testament
  • New Year's Blessings: Looking Back and Looking Forward
  • Five New Books to Read in the New Year
  • Find Hope in Christ
  • The History and Legend of the Church's Villains
  • Religious, Not Spiritual: Why Christianity Requires Community
  • The Nativity: the Sanctuary of Our Souls
  • The Body and the Liturgy: How the Theology of the Body Connects to Prayer
  • Why Nero Goes Down as One of the Worst Villains in History
  • Birth Control and the Blessed Trinity
  • Was Jesus from Bethlehem?: A Biblical Look at Jesus’ Hometown
  • The Adoration of the Shepherds
  • Son of David: What the Genealogy of Jesus Tells Us
  • Giving Back to Our Priests
  • The Coming of Advent
  • Recipe: Beer and Bourbon Shepherdess Pie
  • 5 Things to Do with Your Catholic Child(ren) Every Day
  • All Salvation Comes through Christ, but Does It Depend on Mary?
  • Learning to Listen: Advice for Spiritual Directors
  • Recipe: Simple Cauliflower and Gruyere Tart
  • Understanding Mary's Perpetual Virginity
  • Why We Should Be Proud to Belong to the Universal Church
  • Called to Communion: Why We Celebrate Holy Days
  • Recipe: Bacon-Jalapeño Macaroni and Cheese
  • How to Be the Spiritual Head and Heart of Your Family
  • The Complimentarity of Husband and Wife
  • What Is 'Feminine Authority'?
  • The History of Christian Feasting
  • What to Know About Marriage Vows
  • Encouragement in Our Vocation from Matthew, the Tax Collector
  • Unique and Unrepeatable: Finding Your Mission, Finding Your Vocation
  • The Burning Truth About Purgatory
  • Why Do We Save Saints' Bones?
  • The Communion of Saints, Indulgences, and Luther: A Primer
  • Fifth Annual Gala (2018) Highlights
  • The Burning Coal: Eucharist in the Old Testament
  • Recovering Halloween
  • The Subtle Serpent: Lessons on Spiritual Warfare from the Bible
  • Do Catholics Believe in Ghosts?: Church Teaching on Purgatory
  • What to Know About Catholic Deliverance and Exorcism
  • Keeping the First Commandment: How to Avoid Misguided Spirituality in a Culture Hooked on Halloween
  • Book Review: The Eucharist
  • History and Theology Lead Us to the Church
  • The Eucharist: A Model of Perfect Virtue
  • Learning Sacrificial Love in the Blessed Sacrament
  • Unmasking Popular Spiritualities: What Teresa of Avila Can Teach Us Today
  • Praying for Our Leaders: Thoughts from St. Teresa of Avila
  • St. Teresa on Sharing Our Weaknesses
  • Facing Trials with St. Teresa
  • St. Teresa on Spiritual Warfare
  • St. Teresa on Detachment
  • St. Thérèse's Antidote to Scrupulosity
  • St. Thérèse: Peace Is Not the Same as Joy
  • Suffering as an Expression of Common Love
  • St. Thérèse on Long-Suffering and Prayer
  • St. Thérèse's Act of Oblation to Merciful Love
  • Stewards in the Temple of Creation
  • What the Movies Get Wrong About Exorcism
  • Going Deeper with Spiritual Direction
  • The Journey to God, Explained by the Saints
  • Guidance in Prayer from a Spiritual Director
  • Freedom for God: Letting Go of Disordered Desires
  • Why We Need a Green Revolution, Catholic Style
  • What Is Spiritual Direction?: A Spiritual Director Explains
  • The Problem of Evil
  • How We Got So Confused: Modernism and the Theology of the Body
  • Why We Can't Decide: Understanding the Vocations Crisis
  • Cardinal Newman Award Dinner Honoring the Rev. George W. Rutler
  • It's Time to Save the World Again
  • What Would Jesus Say About Modern Medicine?
  • Why We Have a Creed
  • Jesus Wants Us to Have It All: Reading the Bible in Its Fullest Sense
  • The Body of Christ is a Literal Reality in the Church
  • The Authority of Women in the Catholic Church
  • The Catholic Liturgy: Communion with the Sublime
  • When Augustine Found God
  • St. Augustine's Theology of the Eucharist
  • A Recipe for Hospitality: Simple Blackberry Cobbler
  • The Queenship of Mary
  • St. Louis and a Most Christian Kingdom
  • How the Philosophy of History Points to the Lord of History
  • Who Is the Woman of Revelation?
  • Seek That Which Is Above
  • The Assumption of Mary
  • A Mid-August Feast: Celebrating the Assumption with Generosity, Patience, and Love
  • Unlocking the Stories of Scripture for Children
  • Photographer to the Saints
  • Rethinking the Joyful Mysteries
  • Dog of the Lord
  • How One of the Most Devout Students of Scripture Became One of Its Greatest Teachers
  • Rediscovering The Sense of Mystery
  • Holding Firm to Tradition
  • Is the Church in the Bible?
  • Food and Good Friends
  • Signed, Sealed, and Delivered: The Sign of the Cross
  • Mary, Our Mother
  • Defending Humanae Vitae 50 Years Later
  • Marriage and the Common Good
  • The Gospel of Sonship: What It Means to Be Part of the Family of God
  • The Prophetic Witness of Humanae Vitae
  • Applying Natural Law to Contraception
  • The First Society
  • A Model of Devotion, a Model for the Priesthood
  • John's Revelation: Toward the Everlasting City
  • A Priest's Reflection on Sacred Architecture
  • What Makes a Great Theologian?
  • Why Jesus Wants You to Hug Trees
  • The Difference Between Prayer and the Spiritual Life
  • The Relationship Between Grace, the Intellect, and the Will
  • A Ph.D. in Record Time
  • Apologetics: What It Is and Isn't and Why It Matters
  • Why Leisure Suits You: Your Summer Guide to Becoming Happier, Healthier, and Holier
  • Why Faith Is Reasonable
  • Aquinas: The Universal Doctor
  • 15th Anniversary Gala (2016) Highlights
  • St. Teresa of Avila on False Humility
  • An Introduction: Living the Mystery of Merciful Love
  • The Love of St.Thérèse of Lisieux
  • Follow the Path of the Saints
  • Scott Hahn Unleashes the Creed
  • The Greatest Sacrament: An Excerpt From Speaking the Love of God by Jacob Wood
  • The Creed: Yesterday and Today
  • Right & Just
  • Come to the Feast: Study and Dialogue
  • New Song by Scott Hahn
  • The New ‘Ark’
  • Bible and the Virgin Mary is Now Available on DVD
  • Celebrating Ten Years of Journey Through Scripture
  • Mom by Scott Hahn
  • Defenders of the Family: JPII & Gianna
  • 5 Ways to Strengthen Your Family Today
  • Pray for us!
  • Typing Tutor by Scott Hahn
  • Molly Lou Hahn (1928-2015) Rest in Peace
  • Summer Vocation by Scott Hahn
  • A Novena Celebrating Our Mother
  • The Beggar’s Banquet Takes the Prize
  • Why Shepherds?
  • On the Road by Scott Hahn
  • Emmaus Road Joins the St. Paul Center
  • John the Baptist: In the Spirit and Power of Elijah
  • Into the Deep! by Scott Hahn
  • O Sacrum Convivium by Fr. Brian Mullady O.P.
  • Scott Hahn - The Ascension: The Underrated Mystery
  • The Mysteries of May
  • The Spread of the Kingdom in Acts
  • The Love that Covers a Multitude of Sins: A Reflection on Divine Mercy
  • Explore the Many Riches of the Catholic Faith
  • The Springtime of Evangelization
  • Saint John Paul II, Pray for us!
  • Christmas Comes Early!
  • Scott Hahn - Saint Paul: Persecutor to Apostle
  • St. Justin Martyr - Father and Apologist
  • Our Lenten Reading List
  • St. Ambrose: A Giant of the Faith
  • Fasting on Fridays and the Passion of Jesus the Bridegroom
  • Booknotes - Truth be Told: Basics in Catholic Apologetics
  • Lenten Back to Basics
  • Saint Agatha, Virgin, Martyr
  • Scott Hahn - Rich in Mercy
  • “The Theologian”: Mike Aquilina & Matthew Leonard discuss Gregory of Nazianzus
  • BookNotes - Louder Than Words: The Art of Living as a Catholic
  • Matthew Leonard - Beer, Chocolate and Embracing Lent
  • Aquinas: The Biblical Approach of the Model Catholic Theologian
  • New Evangelization: The Courtship of Love
  • The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
  • Where is the Eucharistic Sacrifice in the Bible?
  • Scott Hahn Explains Papal Infallibility
  • “What’s So ‘Great’ about St. Basil?” with Matthew Leonard and Mike Aquilina.
  • St. Agnes, a lamb for Christ
  • Get the Newest Letter and Spirit
  • Joy without Borders
  • Scott Hahn - Forty Days
  • Matthew Leonard - St. Polycarp’s Most Holy Death
  • The Great Witness of St. Perpetua with Mike Aquilina & Matthew Leonard
  • Booknotes - St. Monica and the Power of Persistent Prayer
  • There’s an App for That
  • God in the Details
  • No Problem, Houston!
  • writer. fighter. mitre - St. Leo the Great
  • The King, the Drama, and the Joy
  • Feast Forward by Scott Hahn
  • To Stir with Love by Scott Hahn
  • BookNotes - St. Monica and the Power of Persistent Prayer
  • Pray Thee Well!
  • Introducing our Latest Scripture Study! “The Bible and Prayer”
  • Angels and Saints
  • “Come, Receive Grain and Eat”
  • The Seventh Summer by Scott Hahn
  • Blessed Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle, the Apostle of India.
  • The Ascension: The Underrated Mystery
  • Exodus and Easter
  • An Invitation to Evangelization
  • Building the Temple of God: Fifth Sunday of Easter
  • “The Good Shepherd”: The Readings for the Fourth Sunday after Easter
  • Feast of St. Athanasius
  • Star Light, Star Bright by Scott Hahn
  • A Throne Established Forever
  • Rich in Mercy by Scott Hahn
  • More Than A Feeling: The Aura of St. John Paul II
  • The “Billy Graham of Scandinavia” Announces His Conversion to Catholicism
  • Holy Thursday Mass of the Lord’s Supper
  • Jesus’ Triumphal Entry, the Descent into Hell, and the Coming of the Messiah (Palm Sunday, Yea
  • Mercy’s Month by Scott Hahn
  • “I’m Back!”: The Raising of Lazarus, 5th Sunday of Lent
  • Beer, Chocolate and Embracing Lent
  • Truth Be Told
  • Give me a Drink! The Third Sunday of Lent
  • Feast of St. Cyril of Jerusalem
  • The Great Witness of St. Perpetua
  • Overcoming Temptation: 1st Sunday of Lent
  • The Greatness of Lent by Scott Hahn
  • Franciscan University Presents: “Consuming the Word” on EWTN
  • Thomas Aquinas on John 6:53 (“the flesh is of no avail”)
  • The Tolerance of Paganism
  • Loving Your Enemies: John Bergsma Examines the 7th Sunday in Ordinary Time
  • All the Right Moves
  • Converted and Converting
  • Feast of St. Anthony of the Desert
  • Pope Francis and Biblical Interpretation
  • “A Virgin Shall Conceive”: The Readings for the Fourth Sunday of Advent
  • St. Ignatius, "God-Carrier"
  • The Bible and the Rosary: How to Hear the Word of God in Prayer
  • Record High in Florida!
  • A Radical Sabbatical
  • St. Jerome - Changing the World from a Cave
  • Chrysostom and the Mysteries of Marriage
  • My Summer Vocation
  • Introducing a New Video Series: BookNotes
  • LIVE online video chat with Scott Hahn!
  • Demanding an Apology
  • Most Rev. José Gomez: 2013 Baccalaureate Mass Homily
  • Pope Benedict’s Wednesday Audience on Philip the Apostle
  • St. Athanasius: Mike Aquilina Reflects on this great Church Father
  • May Memories
  • Grow in your Knowledge of Scripture!
  • All Things New
  • Prepare for The Hour
  • The Jewish Roots of Palm Sunday and the Passion
  • “Louder Than Words: The Art of Living As a Catholic”
  • Ratzinger on Scripture and Revelation:
  • Forward March! by Scott Hahn
  • Grande Munus - An Encyclical on Sts. Cyril and Methodius
  • Romans: The Gospel According to St. Paul
  • Leroy Huizenga on Hildegard of Bingen, a New Doctor of the Church
  • Pope Benedict speaks on the “depth of God’s love for us”
  • New Year, New Book!
  • The Theologian
  • “What’s So ‘Great’ about St. Basil?” with Matthew Leonard and Mike Aquilina.
  • Spirit of Advent
  • The Dark Night Rises
  • A Season of Mary
  • Do You Believe in Magi?
  • A True Thanksgiving
  • An Act of Love by God!
  • writer. fighter. mitre - St Leo the Great:
  • Matthew Leonard - What Do We Do Now?
  • Unveiling the Writings of St. Luke!
  • Matthew Leonard & Dr. John Bergsma: Unveiling the Writings of St. Luke
  • Ignatius made me do it!
  • Matthew Leonard On St. Ignatius of Antioch
  • Scott Hahn: Catechism and the Year of Faith
  • O Give Thanks to the LORD!
  • Changing the World from a Cave
  • New Testament: Sacrifice or Execution
  • Mystagogy of Marriage?
  • Matthew Leonard Explains the Mystagogy of Marriage According to St. John Chrysostom
  • What is the New Evangelization?
  • Matthew Leonard On St. Gregory the Great
  • Celebrate the Feast of St. Augustine
  • Scott Hahn on the Queenship of the Blessed Virgin Mary
  • per Mariam ad Iesum (through Mary we are led to Jesus)
  • Sitting at the Feet of this Cranky Master - St. Hippolytus
  • On Friar for God
  • Summer Heat Wave
  • Fury of the Idolaters, Beauty of the Faith
  • The Heavenly Liturgy in Judaism, the New Testament and the Eucharistic Celebration
  • What We're Reading Now: St. Bernard on Song of Songs
  • Feast of St. Benedict
  • Catholic Church Architecture Part 1 of 10: Architectural Theology
  • Jesus as Prophet, His Prophetic Signs and the Last Supper (Podcast and Outline)
  • Thomas the Twin
  • Seven Upward
  • The Early Church. . . Mothers? Mike Aquilina’s Fascinating New Book (w/ Podcast!)
  • The Church’s First Theologian
  • Cyril the Virile
  • Bishops Announce New Translation of the New Testament
  • Origen and His Influence on Christian Theology
  • Feast of Faith
  • Lost Homilies of Origen Found!
  • First copy of Nehemiah found in unpublished Dead Sea Scrolls!
  • Fr. Michael Scanlan Chair of Biblical Theology and the New Evangelization
  • The Dead Sea Scrolls
  • "To the Ends of the Earth"
  • Bride and Joy
  • Father of Orthodoxy, St. Athanasius
  • Old Testament Manuscripts
  • The Text of the Old Testament
  • Perspectives Principles And Criteria: John Bergsma on the Bible in Catholic Theology
  • Paul's Strange Mention of Co-Senders: What It Might Mean
  • EWTN Live - Benedict XVI and Verbum Domini - Fr Mitch Pacwa, SJ with Dr. Scott Hahn - 03-02-2011
  • The Splendor of Eschatology: Highlights from Matthew Levering’s Jesus and the Demise of Death
  • Catholic Exegesis: A Streamlined Overview
  • Aquinas' Five Reasons Christ Rose from the Dead
  • Eighth Day Dawning
  • Catholic Interpretation of Scripture
  • No Place Like Rome
  • Inspiration and the Relationship of Divine and Human Authorship
  • BREAKING!: New Document Promotes Priority of Scripture in Theology
  • Inspiration of Scripture in the Catholic Tradition
  • Intro to Lent III: Almsgiving
  • Supernatural Revelation
  • Intro to Lent II: Fasting
  • Natural Revelation in the Catholic Tradition
  • Intro to Lent 1: Prayer
  • Thoughts on the Church’s Old Testament Canon
  • “Paschal Sacrifice: A Heavenly Banquet for Earthly Beggars”
  • The Real Campaign
  • RERUM OMNIUM PERTURBATIONEM: Encyclical of Pope Pius XI on St. Francis de Sales
  • The Man in the Desert!
  • Why Jesus was Baptized and Tempted?; with John Bergsma
  • Saint Gregory of Nyssa
  • Ushering in the New Year of Faith!
  • The Feast of St. Basil
  • The Real Meaning of Christmas
  • "To us, Christ is all!"
  • The Big Difference a little change makes
  • ‘And with Your Spirit’
  • Advent 2011: Extraordinary Time
  • Kinship by Covenant: Reviewed by Pablo Gadenz
  • Dr. Scott Hahn - Paschal Sacrifice: A Heavenly Banquet for Earthly Beggars
  • John Bergsma on the Dead Sea Scrolls
  • The Successor of Peter and Biblical Interpretation
  • Great Time at the Shrine
  • The Supper of the Lamb
  • Pope Benedict Calls for a Year of Faith
  • Scott Hahn Addresses the New Evangelization
  • St. Paul Center to Government Regulators:
  • Why the Pope Has to Be Infallible, Part 3
  • Exegesis as Theology, Theology as Exegesis
  • Why the Pope has to be Infallible, Part 2a
  • In the School of Pope Benedict
  • Why the Pope has to be Infallible, Part 2
  • Blessed the Barron
  • Why the Pope has to be Infallible, Part 1
  • Journey Through Scripture Success
  • Are War and Schism always Sins Against Charity?
  • Pope recommends Bible for vacation reading
  • St. Lawrence of Brindisi: A Life Inspired by Love of Sacred Scripture
  • 1,400-year-old St Paul fresco discovered in ancient Roman catacomb
  • Reflection by Benedict XVI on Sts. Peter and Paul
  • The Catholic Understanding of the Saints: Isn't Christ the 'One Mediator'?
  • Holy Land Pilgrimage Day 4
  • Summer Vocation
  • Understanding the Book of Acts—Part 3: More Similarities Between Luke and Acts
  • The Eucharistic Theology of Early Church Fathers
  • Understanding the Book of Acts: Part 2—Acts of Jesus & Acts of the Apostles
  • Understanding the Book of Acts: Part 1—“Why Do You Persecute Me?”
  • Jesus Didn't Just "Die for Our Salvation": Why He Rose from the Dead
  • The Whole Earth Keeps Silence
  • Was There a Passover Lamb at the Last Supper?
  • Holy Thursday
  • Our Big Day
  • Presenting a Paper for the Matthew Section at SBL
  • Archbishop Gomez on the Pope's Book as the Model for Scripture Study
  • Out of Africa
  • Archbishop Gomez's Inspiring Inaugural Homily
  • Sirach as Scripture in Judaism?
  • Jesus as the Davidic Messiah in Matthew (Part 2 of 2)
  • What is the Biblical Form of Church Government?
  • St. Polycarp, bishop and martyr (c. 155)
  • The Petrine Principal
  • Jesus as the Davidic Messiah in Matthew (Part 1 of 2)
  • Newman at First Things'
  • Reasons to Rock
  • New USCCB Document Highlights Biblical Quotations in the Mass
  • Kingdom of the Poor
  • Fantastic New Commentary on Matthew's Gospel!
  • Word Association
  • Catholic Saint on the Importance of Scripture
  • Ruth and Advent
  • A Christmas Invitation
  • The Great St. Ambrose
  • Was Joseph Really Suspicious of Mary’s Pregnancy?
  • St. Nicholas Day
  • Ignatius of Antioch on the Eucharist
  • Pope Benedict XVI's New Apostolic Exhortation on the Bible is Here!
  • The World Series of Bible Study
  • Not Your Average Reading Group
  • Emery on the Biblical Methodology of Aquinas
  • Dead Sea Scrolls On-Line
  • Like the Early Christians, We Should Learn to See Again the Gospel as… Fresh, Attractive.
  • Holy Land, Happy Landings
  • Becoming little in order to be truly wise
  • Behold, I make all things Newman!
  • Who is the Rich Man of Luke 16?
  • For Future Reference
  • Is Peter the Rock? (Part 3: Some Reasons I Think He Is)
  • Matthias Scheeben on the Mysteries of Christianity (Part 3)
  • Is Peter the Rock? (Part 2: Gundry's Take)
  • Is Peter the Rock? (Part 1)
  • Matthias Scheeben on the Mysteries of Christianity (Part 2)
  • Matthias Scheeben on the Mysteries of Christianity (Part 1)
  • A Pilgrimage to Our Lady
  • Holy Father
  • Fathers Forever
  • St. Paul Center Pilgrimage and Dr. Hahn’s Talk
  • Dr. Hahn Meets Pope On Rome Pilgrimage!
  • Dr. David Warner, 1955-2010
  • Dr. Scott Hahn and Fr. Barron discuss Modernity, the Bible and Theology
  • Top Vatican Official Praises Scott Hahn
  • Break Dancing
  • Turn, Turn, Turn
  • Rome & Assisi Pilgrimage!
  • The Paschal Mystery
  • Rome Sweet Home
  • Hope Springs Eternal
  • You Say You Want a Resolution?
  • A True Blessing
  • Signs of Life
  • A Lamp Unto My Feet
  • Journey Through Scripture in Green Bay
  • The Creed: Gateway to Grace
  • Covenant and Communion
  • Bible and the Sacraments in Toledo
  • Facing the Future
  • The Lawler Treasury
  • Bible and the Mass in Toledo
  • Scripture Conference at St. Vincent Seminary
  • A Defining Moment
  • 2009 Letter & Spirit Summer Institute
  • Endings and Beginnings
  • Inspiration and Interpretation
  • Paul the Priest
  • Palms and Circumstance
  • Journey Through Scripture in Toledo
  • First Bible Study of 2009
  • Reno on Recovering the Bible
  • The Acceptable Time
  • Love: A Many-Splendored Mystery
  • Apostle of Hope
  • Synod Wrap Up
  • Drinking Deeply Made Easy
  • Scripture and Liturgy in Heaven…and England
  • A Day Late and a Decade Short
  • I Hear a Symphony: The Many Meanings of “the Word of God”
  • Pope: Synods Fundamental to Church
  • What Is Needed for a Bible Comeback (Part 2)
  • What Is Needed for a Bible Comeback (Part 1)

The Presentation of Jesus

Upon the eighth day following His birth, the Lord was Luke ii. 21. circumcised, and the name Jesus given Him. Forty days after the birth, Mary presented herself with the child Luke ii. 22-38. at the Temple in accordance with the law, and after the presentation returned again to Bethlehem.

The order of events following Christ's birth to the time He went to reside at Nazareth, is much disputed. The chief point of controversy is respecting the time of the visit of the Magi. If this can be determined, the other events may be easily arranged.

An early and current tradition placed the coming of the Magi on the 6th of January, or on the 13th day after His birth. 3 This day was early celebrated as the Feast of the Epiphany, or the manifestation of Christ, and originally had reference to His birth, to the visit of the Magi, and to His baptism. It is now observed both in the Greek and Roman Churches with reference to the latter two events, of which the adoration of the Magi is made most prominent. This is also the case in the English and American Episcopal Churches. But the tradition did not command universal assent. Eusebius and Epiphanius, reasoning from Matt, ii. 16, put the coming of the Magi two years after His birth. And others have thought the 6th January selected for convenience, rather than as having any direct chronological connection with the event. The apocryphal gospel of the birth of Mary puts their coming on the forty-second day, or after the presentation, but some copies on the 13th. 1

If we now ask the grounds upon which, aside from this tradition, the coming of the wise men is placed so soon after the birth, and before the presentation in the Temple, the more important are these: first, that the words Tov 8c Irjcrov yevvrjOevTos, " Now when Jesus was born," (Matt. ii. 1,) imply that the one event speedily followed the other, the participle being in the aoristandnot in the perfect; second, that directly after the presentation Jesus went with His parents to Nazareth, (Luke ii. 39,) and that therefore the presentation must have been preceded by their visit; third, that at the coming of the Magi Herod first heard of the birth of Jesus, but if the presentation at the Temple had previously taken place, he must have heard of it, as it had been made public by Anna, (Luke ii. 38.) But none of these reasons is decisive. There is nothing, as asserted, in the use of ytvvYjOevTos, " now when Jesus was born," that proves that they came so soon as He was born, or that an interval of two months may not have elapsed. 2 The opinion of many of the fathers that they found Him still in the manger, or stall, in spelunca ilia qua natus est, may be true, if the manger was in a cave in the rear of the house. (See Matt. ii. 11.) The statement of Luke, that " when they had performed all things according to the law of the Lord, they returned into Galilee, to their own city Nazareth," has often been interpreted as affirming that they went directly from the temple to Nazareth without any return to Bethlehem. 1 But this interpretation is arbitrary. It is apparent that Luke does not design to give a full history of Christ's infancy. He says nothing of the Magi, of the murder of the children, of the flight into Egypt. Whatever may have been the motive of this omission, which Alford, in common with many German critics, ascribes to ignorance, nothing can be inferred from it to the impugning of Matthew's accuracy. His statement respecting the return to Galilee is general, and does not imply any strict chronological connection. Elsewhere in Luke like instances occur, as in iv. 14, where Jesus is said to have " returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee," whence it would appear that this return followed immediately upon the temptation ; yet we know that an interval of several months must have elapsed. It is the fact that His childhood was.passed at Nazareth, which Luke brings prominently forward, not the precise time when He went thither, which w^as unimportant. It is not inconsistent with his language that Jesus should have returned to Bethlehem from the Temple, an afternoon walk of two hours, and have gone thence to Nazareth by way of Egypt, though had we this gospel alone, we could not infer this. Besides, it is apparent from Matthew's narrative (ii. 22-3) that Joseph did not design upon his return from Egypt to go to Galilee, and went thither only by express divine direction. Plainly he looked upon Bethlehem, not Nazareth, as the proper home of the child who should be the heir of David. 2 And finally the fact that Anna " spoke of Him to all them that looked for redemption in Jerusalem," by no means shows that her words came to the ears of Herod.

Those who thus place the visit of the Magi before the purification of Mary and the presentation of Jesus, are by no means agreed as to the time of the latter events. If the visit of the Magi was on the thirteenth day after His birth, and the murder of the children and the flight into Egypt took place immediately after, the purification must have been delayed till the return, and so in any event after the legal time on the fortieth day. 1 To avoid this, some suppose that, although the suspicions of Herod had been aroused by the inquiries of the Magi, yet he took no active measures for the destruction of the child, till the rumor of what had taken place at the Temple at the time of the presentation (Luke ii. 27-38) reaching his ears, stirred him up to give immediate order for the murder of the children. 2 Others still, making the departure to Nazareth to have immediately followed the purification, are compelled to make Nazareth, not Bethlehem, the starting point of the flight into Egypt. 3

The obvious difficulties connected with this traditional view of the coming of the wise men on the thirteenth day after the Lord's birth, have led most in modern times to put it after the purification on the fortieth day. Some, who hold that Jesus went immediately after that event to Nazareth, suppose that after a short sojourn there He returned to Bethlehem, and there was found by the wise men. 4 But most who put the purification upon the fortieth day, make the visit of the Magi to have shortly followed, and prior to any departure to Nazareth. 5 And this order seems best to harmonize the scripture narratives. The language of Lukeii. 22, compared with v. 21, plainly intimates that as the circumcision took place on the eighth, or legal day, so did the presentation on the fortieth. Till this day, the mother was regarded as unclean, and was to abide at home, and it is therefore very improbable that the adoration of the Magi, and especially the flight into Egypt, should have previously taken place. Doubtless, in case of necessity, all the legal requisitions could have been set aside, but this necessity is not proved in this case to have existed. That the purification was after the return from Egypt, is inconsistent with Matthew's statements, (ii. 22), that after Joseph had heard that Archelaus was reigning in Judea, he was afraid to go thither. If, then, he dare not even enter the king's territory, how much less would he dare to go to Jerusalem, and enter publicly into the temple. The conjecture of some, 1 that Archelaus was then absent at Rome, is wholly without historic proof.

1 Friedlieb, Bucher. a Augustine, Sepp, Alford. 3 Maldonati.

4 Epiphanius, and now Jarvis, and Patritius. 6 Robinson, Teschendorf, Wieseler, Lichtenstein.

That Matthew puts the flight into Egypt in immediate connection with the departure of the Magi, (ii. 13.) is plain. 2 No interval could have elapsed after their departure, for it is said, v. 14, that he " took the young child and His mother by night, and departed into Egypt." He went so soon as the angel appeared to him, apparently the same night. We cannot then place the history of the purification after their departure, and before the flight into Egypt, as is done by Calvin and many. Nor could Herod, after his jealousy had been aroused by the inquiries of the Magi after the new-born King of the Jews, have waited quietly several weeks till the events at the purification awakened his attention anew. He doubtless acted here with that decision that characterized all his movements, and seeing himself mocked by the wise men, took instant measures for the destruction of the child.

The fact that Mary offered the offering of the poor, (Luke ii. 24,) may be mentioned as incidentally confirming this view; for if she had received previously the gifts of the Magi, particularly the gold, we may suppose that she would have used it to provide a better offering. 1

We thus trace a threefold adoration of Christ: 1st, that of the shepherds; 2d, that of Simeon and Anna ; 3d, that of the Magi; or a twofold adoration of the Jews, and then the adoration of the heathen.

the presentation in the bible

  • Interlinear
  • More ▼
  • 2 Steps (Chapter)
  • 3 Steps (Verse)
  • Bible Search
  • Popular Verses
  • Thematic Bible
  • Cross References

'Presentation' in the Bible

and put all of them in the hands of Aaron and his sons and wave them as a presentation offering before the Lord.

“Take the breast from the ram of Aaron’s ordination and wave it as a presentation offering before the Lord; it is to be your portion.

Consecrate for Aaron and his sons the breast of the presentation offering that is waved and the thigh of the contribution that is lifted up from the ram of ordination.

Both men and women came; all who had willing hearts brought brooches, earrings, rings, necklaces, and all kinds of gold jewelry—everyone who waved a presentation offering of gold to the Lord.

All the gold of the presentation offering that was used for the project in all the work on the sanctuary, was 2,193 pounds, according to the sanctuary shekel.

The bronze of the presentation offering totaled 5,310 pounds.

His own hands will bring the fire offerings to the Lord. He will bring the fat together with the breast. The breast is to be waved as a presentation offering before the Lord.

I have taken from the Israelites the breast of the presentation offering and the thigh of the contribution from their fellowship sacrifices, and have assigned them to Aaron the priest and his sons as a permanent portion from the Israelites.”

He put all these in the hands of Aaron and his sons and waved them before the Lord as a presentation offering.

He also took the breast and waved it before the Lord as a presentation offering; it was Moses’ portion of the ordination ram as the Lord had commanded him.

but he waved the breasts and the right thigh as a presentation offering before the Lord, as Moses had commanded.

But you and your sons and your daughters may eat the breast of the presentation offering and the thigh of the contribution in any ceremonially clean place, because these portions have been assigned to you and your children from the Israelites’ fellowship sacrifices.

They are to bring the thigh of the contribution and the breast of the presentation offering, together with the offerings of fat portions made by fire, to wave as a presentation offering before the Lord. It will belong permanently to you and your children, as the Lord commanded.”

The priest is to take one male lamb and present it as a restitution offering, along with the one-third quart of olive oil, and he must wave them as a presentation offering before the Lord.

The priest will take the male lamb for the restitution offering and the one-third quart of olive oil, and wave them as a presentation offering before the Lord.

“You are to count seven complete weeks starting from the day after the Sabbath, the day you brought the sheaf of the presentation offering.

Bring two loaves of bread from your settlements as a presentation offering, each of them made from four quarts of fine flour, baked with yeast, as firstfruits to the Lord.

The priest will wave the lambs with the bread of firstfruits as a presentation offering before the Lord; the bread and the two lambs will be holy to the Lord for the priest.

The priest is to wave them as a presentation offering before the Lord. It is a holy portion for the priest, in addition to the breast of the presentation offering and the thigh of the contribution. After that, the Nazirite may drink wine.

Aaron is to present the Levites before the Lord as a presentation offering from the Israelites, so that they may perform the Lord’s work.

“You are to have the Levites stand before Aaron and his sons, and you are to present them before the Lord as a presentation offering.

After that the Levites may come to serve at the tent of meeting, once you have ceremonially cleansed them and presented them as a presentation offering.

The Levites purified themselves and washed their clothes; then Aaron presented them before the Lord as a presentation offering. Aaron also made atonement for them to ceremonially cleanse them.

“The contribution of their gifts also belongs to you. I have given all the Israelites’ presentation offerings to you and to your sons and daughters as a permanent statute. Every ceremonially clean person in your house may eat it.

But their meat belongs to you. It belongs to you like the breast of the presentation offering and the right thigh.

You are also to offer the second lamb toward the evening. Just like the morning sacrifice, you are to present the grain offering, accompanied by its corresponding drink offering, as a presentation made by fire, a pleasing aroma to the LORD."

They set aside in reserve the burnt offerings, so they could distribute them in proportion to the divisions of their ancestral households for presentation by the people to the LORD, as is required by the book of Moses. They did this with respect to the bulls, also.

for the loaves of presentation and for the regular grain offerings and regular burnt offerings, for the Sabbaths, for the new moons, for the appointed meetings, for the holy offerings, for the sin offerings to make atonement for Israel, and for all the work of the temple of our God.

how he went into the house of God, and the loaves of the presentation did eat, which it is not lawful to him to eat, nor to those with him, except to the priests alone?

how he went into the house of God, (at 'Abiathar the chief priest,') and the loaves of the presentation did eat, which it is not lawful to eat, except to the priests, and he gave also to those who were with him?'

how he went into the house of God, and the loaves of the presentation did take, and did eat, and gave also to those with him, which it is not lawful to eat, except only to the priests?'

And those parts of the body that we think to be less honorable, we clothe these with greater honor, and our unpresentable parts have a better presentation .

For a tabernacle was set up, and in the first room, which is called the holy place, were the lampstand, the table, and the presentation loaves.

Search Results by Versions

  • HCSB (27)
  • ISV (2)
  • LEB (4)
  • NET (2)
  • YLT (3)

Search Results by Book

  • Leviticus (12)
  • Numbers (8)
  • 2 Chronicles (1)
  • Nehemiah (1)
  • Matthew (1)
  • 1 Corinthians (1)
  • Hebrews (1)

Related Words

  • Misrepresentation (1 instance in 1 translation)
  • Presentability (1 instance in 1 translation)
  • Presentable (2 instances in 5 translations)
  • Representation (8 instances in 6 translations)
  • Representations (6 instances in 4 translations)
  • Representative (21 instances in 6 translations)
  • Representatives (40 instances in 6 translations)
  • Unpresentable (1 instance in 4 translations)

Bible Theasaurus

  • Demonstration ( 8 instances )
  • Display ( 80 instances )
  • Introduction ( 4 instances )
  • Presentation ( 33 instances )

Related Readings

  • 4 more readings on Presentation

Related Topics

  • Animal Sacrifices, Heave Offering
  • Animal Sacrifices, Wave Offering
  • Misrepresentation
  • Thighs Of Animals
  • Wave Offerings

Holman Christian Standard Bible®, Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2009 by Holman Bible Publishers .

International Standard Version Copyright © 1996-2008 by the ISV Foundation .

NET Bible copyright © 1996-2006 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. NetBible

  • All Translations (Parallel)
  • NASB New American Standard Bible
  • KJV King James Version
  • HCSB Holman Bible
  • ISV International Standard Version
  • YLT Youngs Literal Translation
  • Darby Darby Translation
  • ASV American Standard Version
  • WBS Webster
  • NET NET Bible
  • AMP Amplified
  • LEB Lexham Expanded Bible
  • WEB World English Bible
  • WE Worldwide English (NT)
  • EMB The Emphasized Bible
  • BBE Bible in Basic English
  • WNT Weymouth New Testament
  • KJ2000 King James 2000
  • AUV An Understandable Version
  • MSTC Modern Spelling Tyndale-Coverdale
  • MKJV Modern King James verseion
  • JuliaSmith Julia Smith Translation
  • Godbey Godbey New Testament
  • ACV A Conservative Version
  • NHEB New Heart English Bible
  • Mace Daniel Mace New Testament
  • Wesley John Wesley New Testament
  • Worsley Worsley New Testament
  • Haweis Thomas Haweis New Testament
  • Diaglott Emphatic Diaglott Bible
  • LOV Living Oracles New Testament
  • Sawyer Sawyer New Testament
  • ABU American Bible Union New Testament
  • Anderson Anderson New Testament
  • Noyes Noyes New Testament
  • TCV Twentieth Century New Testament
  • Worrell Worrell New Testament
  • Moffatt Moffatt New Testament
  • Goodspeed Goodspeed New Testament
  • MNT Montgomery New Testament
  • Williams Williams New Testament
  • Common Common New Testament

Gary Neal Hansen

Theology. It's good for you.

The Presentation of Jesus — Luke 2:22-40

December 21, 2020 by Gary Neal Hansen Leave a Comment

The Presentation of Jesus in the Temple

On the First Sunday after Christmas, the Revised Common Lectionary offers us the text known as “The Presentation of Jesus.” It’s Luke 2:22-40 and comes in four distinct scenes.

The Presentation

The scene is set for the Presentation with references to the Holy Family and the law of God.

We tend to picture just three people: Mary, Jesus, and Joseph. Tradition has Joseph older, a widower, with children from his first marriage who will, in the Gospels, be called Jesus’ siblings.

The number is not so important. The text emphasizes their Jewish faithfulness. With no fewer than three references to the requirements of the law, they are shown coming to the temple, ready to observe the rites of purification.

It is easy to forget their Jewishness somehow. But this Jesus is the Jewish Messiah, born to a Jewish family in a Jewish land, practicing the Jewish religion. That’s our savior.

The Song of Simeon

To me the heart of the Presentation is the Song of Simeon:

Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace, according to your word; for my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles and for glory to your people Israel. Luke 2:29-32, NRSV

I really love this text. I’ve said or sung it so many times in Episcopal Evening Prayer or Compline services, on retreat at Roman Catholic Benedictine monasteries, and at Wednesday and Saturday Orthodox Vespers services.

And I love the story around it:

Old Simeon, promised by the Spirit (he was sure it was the Spirit… it couldn’t have been his imagination, just a longing heart’s pious wish…) that he would live to see the promised Messiah.

But he was so very old. He felt like it was time to go, to leave this world for — well, for whatever it was that God had in store for those who loved and served him. He was tired, so very tired. He was weak, and he was ill. Would the promise be fulfilled?

Then one day, a day like any other, really, into the Temple walks a family: young mother, older man, babe in arms. Maybe some older kids.

Somehow he knew this was The One. (It had to be… he could just tell… there was that nudge inside, that whisper again…) This baby was the Messiah he had waited so long to see.

So he approached them. He reached out to the woman, wordlessly asking to hold her baby. She didn’t turn away — maybe she knew that this stranger was alright, someone who would be safe with the child. She let him take the boy in his arms.

The look on his face seemed to communicate a blessing. He turned his eyes to heaven and — he sang.

He sang about the end of his life; that he had fulfilled his purpose somehow, having seen and held this child. It sounded as if God were giving him permission to die. But what had he seen?

“My eyes have seen your salvation” he sang. Jesus, as an infant in swaddling cloths, is salvation. Not just Simeon’s personal salvation. God’s gift of salvation, coming to all the world, as the song goes on to say.

Again in this song we have the theme of all Luke’s songs: salvation is not something that will start 33 years in the future, when Jesus is grown, has taught and healed and called disciples, when he finally is crucified. In the very fact of Jesus being born, salvation has come.

In this little child, God is with us. The holy God, the very Image of the Father, has taken up human flesh, become truly human in the womb of Mary. Now human flesh, all humanity, begins the process of being restored to the image of God, renewed in the very likeness of God.

  • The process is not complete in any of us.
  • But it has begun for all of us.
  • And it cannot be stopped, or assumed to be nullified, in even one of us.

I pray for the continued effect of this salvation in me, in my family, in the Church, and throughout the world. I pray for the ability to see and know what Simeon saw and knew and sang of so long ago.

In contemplation I gaze at this child, at the scene with this old man, and at the God who answers my prayer.

Simeon’s Warning

But the Presentation doesn’t end with the Song of Simeon. He pauses to give Mary a bit of prophetic insight.

Jesus, this tiny baby, will be like a big old rock in the path — a rock of ages, perhaps, Some will step up higher by standing on him, and others will trip and fall over him.

And Mary herself gets a bit of a warning. She had just let the excitement of new motherhood take root, displacing the fear and trembling of being pregnant via the Holy Spirit . Now this strange man in the temple tells her a sword will pierce her soul because of her baby boy.

She probably wondered whether it was a mistake to let the old guy hold Jesus a minute or two before.

The Prophet Anna

The last part of the Presentation is so very lovely that it’s a shame it doesn’t get more attention.

It turns out Simeon is not the only elderly person hanging out in the Temple. Anna, an 87 year old prophet, is basically living there.

She worships. She fasts. She prays. She never leaves.

I’d say she embodies those lines in the Psalms, where it says that

Even the sparrow finds a home, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, at your altars, O Lord of hosts, my King and my God. Psalm 84:3 NRSV
For a day in your courts is better than a thousand elsewhere. I would rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God than live in the tents of wickedness. Psalm 84:10 NRSV
Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord my whole life long. Psalm 23:6 NRSV

I’m a little peeved that Luke didn’t record any of her actual words. All he says is that she

…began to praise God and to speak about the child to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem. Luke 2:38 NRSV

I bet she sang.

I mean everybody here sang. Luke 1-2 is basically a musical to which the tunes have been lost.

  • Gabriel sang.
  • Zechariah sang.
  • When Elizabeth spoke to Mary it really sounds a bit like a song too.
  • Old Simeon sang up a storm.

But Anna? No song.

She just heads out from the temple to do the work of a prophet at 87.

Personally? That makes me want to sing.

++++++++++++

This year Mark is the main Gospel in the Revised Common Lectionary. Want a great way to creatively engage with each Sunday’s text? Want something to keep your kids on-topic during the sermon on Sunday? Try my Illuminate-You-Own Gospel of Mark. Each story is on a page of its own, with a blank facing page for doodles, prayers, sermon notes, or journal entries. Click the image below to check it out on Amazon. (It’s an affiliate link.)

the presentation in the bible

Hungry for a way to go deeper with God?

A richer engagement with Scripture helps you as a Christian. It also helps you as you relate to grown ups and kids in ministry.

Subscribe to my (almost) weekly newsletter and I'll send you a free ebook copy of Love Your Bible: Finding Your Way to the Presence of God with a 12th Century Monk.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

Need a new way to engage with the Bible?

Subscribe to my newsletter and I'll send you a free ebook copy of Love Your Bible: Finding Your Way to the Presence of God with a 12th Century Monk. It's a modern introduction to a classic spiritual discipline that brings prayer and Bible study together.

It's manageable. It's fun. And it's free, along with my (almost)weekly newsletter that brings you every new article and announcement.

Let’s connect on social media…

Search the site.

The Presentation of the Lord

(Malachi 3: 1-4, Psalm 24: 7-10, Hebrews 2: 14-18, Luke 2: 22-40)

St. Ignatius of Loyola taught a method of prayer in which we pray by imaginatively entering a scene from scripture. Doing this enables us to be touched by God in a way that gives us “our daily bread” from God—a meaning from the story that guides, comforts, confronts, or encourages us—a meaning from God particular to us.

Today is the Feast of the Presentation. The Gospel is the story of when Mary and Joseph took the now 40 day old Jesus to the temple in Jerusalem to present him to God, in accordance with Jewish law. This story is also the fourth Joyful Mystery of the Rosary.

It is too easy for me to pray familiar scenes like the Presentation in a way that actually insulates me from the daily bread that God would give me from them. They are familiar, so, as I name the fourth mystery I say, “The Presentation in the Temple,” briefly see Mary and Joseph in a structure that looks like pictures of the temple I have seen, and move on with mind and mouth to “Our Father…” followed by mind disconnected from prayer, off on my own concerns while my mouth or part of my mind says “Hail Mary” and my fingers move the beads.

St. Ignatius’ method applied carefully to one of the Mysteries of the Rosary from time to time enables me to be more present to all the mysteries on a regular basis. My prayer group has been studying St. Ignatius’ “imaginative prayer.” I thought perhaps doing it on paper might be a good way to “present” the presentation to you. Doing it so carefully helped me greatly. Perhaps my writing it here will encourage you to do this with mysteries of the rosary or any story in scripture.

As the story begins I picture Mary and Joseph coming from Bethlehem. Bethlehem was just six miles from Jerusalem (about as far as my office is from my parish church). Mary and Joseph have a baby now, so they probably leave Bethlehem with substantially more stuff than they brought from Nazareth. They plan to go home to Nazareth, so all must come with them. For this reason I imagine Joseph guiding the laden down donkey, while Mary walks and carries Jesus. I imagine the two of them walking with smiles on their faces and a lilt to their step. Today is the day they present their child to God! Today they will “ransom” him from God with two pigeons or turtledoves. In this ritual prescribed for Jews from the days of Moses, God says in effect, “your children are mine, but I give them to you to be yours.”

It is 40 days after his birth, so Jesus has filled out a bit. Mary has fed him well. He has bright, inquisitive eyes. He sleeps through most of the journey, but I imagine him alert, looking all around, once they get to the temple. This is his Father’s house, and surely he must have felt some sense of home there.

Leviticus 12: 6-8 describes what was required: “And when the days of her (the mother’s) purification are fulfilled, she shall bring a lamb of the first year for a burnt-offering, and a young pigeon, or a turtle-dove, for a sin offering, unto the door of the tent of meeting, unto the priest. And he shall offer it before the Lord, and make atonement for her, and she shall be cleansed from the fountain of her blood….And if her means suffice not for a lamb, then she shall take two turtle-doves, or two young pigeons…”

Mary and Joseph took the option for the poor, and offered it as an “act of redemption for the son.” Numbers 18: 15-16 describes this in a bit more detail: “Every living thing that opens the womb, whether of man or of beast, such as are to be offered to the Lord, shall be yours; but you must let the first-born of man, as well as of unclean animals, be redeemed. The ransom shall be…”

These laws, made when the Hebrews were leaving Egypt, were clear about God’s goodness and were in contrast to the cultures of neighboring people. God did not require of the Hebrews that they sacrifice their first-born children to him. “They shall be yours.” But that first-born was, by the standards of the times, God’s. Jewish law and culture ritualized that in the purification of the mother and the redemption of the son. The child did not need to be sacrificed; God accepted as little as two-turtle doves or pigeons as ransom enough to give a child back to his parents. (My mind takes a modern turn here to appreciate how wise that was—to have a ritual for helping all parents understand all human life is a gift from God. I sadly contrast that with our world where abortion kills thousands of children each day.)

I see Joseph purchase the birds and hand them over to the priest. Perhaps Mary and Joseph now turn to go toward Nazareth…or perhaps they pause to pray or visit, as Simeon and Anna come on the scene.

Luke says that Anna was elderly—84 years old. He describes Simeon as having been told he would not taste death until he had seen the Messiah, so I tend to imagine him elderly, too. I see them as two older, righteous people, who loved God much, who pray much, and who yearn for the Messiah. At their age, they won’t be around thirty years later when Jesus begins his public ministry.

So God gives them a special, special gift.

Simeon and Anna see Jesus and recognize him—without benefit of star or angel chorus. Their spiritual eyes who have sought God so much now are joined with their physical eyes to see God’s Salvation in an ordinary, poor child. Their joy is exuberant. Simeon asks Joseph and Mary if he may hold Jesus. They smile a yes, and Mary hands him over. As Simeon’s arms cradle Jesus, the Holy Spirit gives him such beautiful words, “Now, Master, you may let your servant go in peace, according to your word, for my eyes have seen your salvation which you prepared in sight of all the peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and glory for your people Israel.”

But then the Spirit gives Simeon additional prophecy of what being the one to bring God’s Salvation will mean for Jesus and his parents, “Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted (and you yourself a sword will pierce) so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.”

Just then Anna joins the scene. I become Anna. I feel tears of joy as I see this tiny child and KNOW this child is the answer to my years of prayer. With Anna, I thank God. I see her hold Jesus and carry him over to friends in the temple—Mary and Joseph right at her side. As she gives Jesus back to his parents, I see her going off to tell more people who were also “awaiting the redemption of Jerusalem.”

I finally imagine Mary, Joseph, and Jesus heading now toward home in Nazareth, wondering at the day, at this child whom God this day has given back to them.

Today I encourage you to read Luke 2: 22-40 slowly two or three times. Then let yourself enter the scene. What in the scene as you pray draws you and holds you? That is what God gives you today. For me, today, it was this rich sense of being Anna, of joy of having seen and touched Jesus, of my life (as Anna) having a sense of fulfillment. I’m not quite sure of the meaning of that, but it seems to be encouraging me toward more prayer, or, perhaps, God is saying that it is good for me to be often in church praying, talking with the people who come, seeing and loving the face of God in each of them.

What might God be saying to you today?

Share this:

the presentation in the bible

  • Share on Tumblr

Through your reflection, I have been blessed. Thanks.

What a beautiful scene! As I close my eyes, taking myself to be there following & watching the Holy Family in all of their activities from home to the temple and on the rituals of offering & cleansing, i feel different emotions. It is like in a 3D movie, as if I was really there.

Watching Simeon, with Anna, looking the facial expression of Joseph & Mary, really it touches me deeply.

Thank you Sis Mary, you have lead my inner self into a new discovery. Thank you so much for this beautiful and awesome learning. A deeper contemplation of the mysteries of the rosary and of the scripture reading. Your narration too help a lot in knowing the background of the story.

There still more and a lot to be learned here!

Thank you for the example of a very all present form of prayer. God Bless.

As I reflect on this scripture reading of the Presentation of baby Jesus for the purification offering at the Temple in Jerusalem as required by the law of Moses after the birth of a child, I remember the baptism of my great nephew, Anthony Michael, on the 6th day of June 2005, he was born April 6. A wonderful celebration attended by family / friends, remembering how I felt that day as I held this tiny baby in my arms.

Thank you Mary, I have been blessed so much reading your reflection on the Presentation, St . Ignatius method of prayer is so wonderful. God bless you .

As i reflect on today’s reading this hymn comes to mind” Oh Blessed are those who fear the lord and walk in his ways” The characters of today’s reading revered the lord true their obedience to the Lord and also their personal relationship with him. In the end they were happy. Its about time i developed a personal relationship with God so i could hear him speak to my spirit and also gain true happiness.

It seems to have a great significance to me that it was human hands that held our saviour and presented him to his father in heaven. And it was human hands that took his life as he presented himself to the father on the cross. As we are human, we as a race were present by representation and were participants at both events. A real mystery to contemplate indeed.

Many thanks Mary for the beautiful comments on this feast. It will help my homily tomorrow. Bob Slattery s.j.

Post a Comment Cancel Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

Notify me of new posts by email.

Currently you have JavaScript disabled. In order to post comments, please make sure JavaScript and Cookies are enabled, and reload the page. Click here for instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your browser.

Lectionary: Pre-Order Discount

Orders of the new lectionary, people's missals and other related items are eligible for discount of up to 15%..

  • Call us: 020 7640 0042

the presentation in the bible

10 Powerful Quotes on the Presentation of the Lord | Catholic Truth Society

  • Basket Basket 0 £ 0.00

10 Powerful Quotes on the Presentation of the Lord

The Presentation in the Temple was an important moment in the life of Jesus. The Church marks the occasion with the feast of the Presentation of the Lord (celebrated on 2nd February) and as the Fourth Joyful Mystery of the Rosary.

the presentation in the bible

Prayer and Devotion , On 29th January 2021 by CTS Staff

These 10 powerful quotes can be used while meditating on the Fourth Joyful Mystery of the Rosary, or for marking the feast of the Presentation of the Lord.

1. God sent His Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order to redeem those who were under the law. (Galatians 4:4-5)

2. mary hurries toward the place of sacrifice and holds the beloved victim in her arms. (alphonsus liguori), 3. she enters the temple, approaches the altar, and there, unassumingly, humbly and devoutly presents him to the most high. (alphonsus liguori), 4. she who gave birth was a virgin, so that neither son nor mother needed to be purified by sacrifices. (anthony of padua), 5. jesus renews, here in the temple, the self-oblation he had made at the moment of his incarnation. (columba marmion), 6. the son of god became man, and was circumcised in the flesh, not for his own sake, but that we might be circumcised in spirit. (thomas aquinas), 7. by this outpouring of his blood he showed that he was beginning to take on the burden of our sins and to appear on earth as a sinner. (john baptist de la salle), 8. is there anything that could be more humiliating for the son of god than to appear as a sinner, although he was holiness itself. (john baptist de la salle), 9. for our sake he was presented to the lord that we may learn to offer ourselves to god. (thomas aquinas), 10. christ willed to be thus offered as a sign of humility; so that by the merit of humility he might teach us to become worthy of divine favour. (thomas aquinas).

the presentation in the bible

Click here to download Praying the Rosary with the Saints on your preferred ebook platform.

Related Products

These quotes are extracted from Praying the Rosary with the Saints, where they can be used to meditate on the Fourth Joyful mystery (a quote for each bead). Here are more publications on the rosary.

the presentation in the bible

A Simple Rosary Book Catholic Truth Society

£ 3.50 • Add to Basket

How to Pray the Rosary

How to Pray the Rosary (Pack of 25 Leaflets) Catholic Truth Society

£ 9.95 • Add to Basket

Praying the Rosary the Saints

Praying the Rosary with the Saints (ebook) Rev Nick Donnelly

£ 2.50 • Add to Basket

the presentation in the bible

The Rosary with Pope Francis Alessandro Saraco, Pope Francis

The Holy Rosary Folding Prayer Card

The Holy Rosary (Pack of 25 Prayer Cards) Catholic Truth Society

£ 7.99 • Add to Basket

the presentation in the bible

  • Catholicism
  • Religious Catalogue
  • Give Monthly
  • 1-800-447-3986
  • [email protected]
  • See of Peter
  • Daily Mass and Readings
  • Seasons and Feast Days
  • Traditional Latin Mass
  • Prayer Requests
  • EWTN News Nightly
  • EWTN Pro-Life Weekly
  • EWTN News In Depth
  • The World Over
  • National Catholic Register
  • Catholic News Agency
  • Weekly Schedule
  • Channel Finder
  • Listen Live
  • Audio Archive
  • Monthly Schedules
  • Podcast Central
  • Galaxy 33 Transmission Plan
  • SW Frequency Guide
  • SW Monitoring Form
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • EWTN Religious Catalogue
  • My Giving Account
  • Ways to Give
  • Mother Angelica
  • Online Learning Series
  • EWTN Everywhere
  • Media Missionaries
  • Privacy Policy
  • International Satellite Feeds

Why do Catholics celebrate the feast of the Presentation?

This feast day celebrates both the Presentation of Jesus in the Temple, as well as the Purification of Mary, which was required by the Mosaic Law forty days after the birth of a child.

The Church celebrates the feast of the Presentation of the Lord on February 2, also called Candlemas for the custom of using lighted candles. In the early Church it was often celebrated on February 14th, 40 days after the Epiphany, in keeping with the practice of celebrating Christmas on that date in the East. Among the Orthodox it is known as the Hypapante (“Meeting” of the Lord with Simeon).

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF SACRED SCRIPTURE

Through this free ebook, the scriptural rosary: joyful mysteries ..

The Holy Rosary is an amazing prayer, encouraged by popes, loved by saints, and prayed by the faithful. Many miracles have come from this beautiful devotion. At its heart, the Rosary is a meditation on Sacred Scripture, on the lives of Jesus and Mary.

Through this Scriptural Rosary, we hope that you will be able to better meditate on each Hail Mary and deepen your understanding of Sacred Scripture. Use the form below to get your free copy of, The Scriptural Rosary .

the presentation in the bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church (paragraph 529) teaches,

The presentation of Jesus in the temple shows him to be the firstborn Son who belongs to the Lord. With Simeon and Anna, all Israel awaits its encounter with the Savior-the name given to this event in the Byzantine tradition. Jesus is recognized as the long-expected Messiah, the “light to the nations” and the “glory of Israel,” but also “a sign that is spoken against.” The sword of sorrow predicted for Mary announces Christ's perfect and unique oblation on the cross that will impart the salvation God had “prepared in the presence of all peoples.”

It is also important to note that, as a poor family, the Holy Family gave an offering of a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons. However, the Lamb whom they brought to the Temple was the Lamb of God.

He was presented when He was still a newborn, only 40 days old.

“In the mysterious encounter between Simeon and Mary, the Old and New Testaments are joined. Together the aging prophet and the young mother give thanks for this Light which has kept the darkness from prevailing. It is the Light which shines in the heart of human life: Christ, the Saviour and Redeemer of the world, ‘a light for revelation to the Gentiles and for the glory of his people Israel.’” – Pope St. John Paul II

The Gospel of Luke 2:22-40 states:

And when the time came for their purification according to the law of Moses, they brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord (as it is written in the law of the Lord, “Every male that opens the womb shall be called holy to the Lord”) and to offer a sacrifice according to what is said in the law of the Lord, “a pair of turtledoves, or two young pigeons.” Now there was a man in Jerusalem, whose name was Simeon, and this man was righteous and devout, looking for the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was upon him. And it had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he should not see death before he had seen the Lord’s Christ. And inspired by the Spirit he came into the temple; and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for him according to the custom of the law, he took him up in his arms and blessed God and said, “Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word; for mine eyes have seen thy salvation which thou hast prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and for glory to thy people Israel.” And his father and his mother marveled at what was said about him; and Simeon blessed them and said to Mary his mother, “Behold, this child is set for the fall and rising of many in Israel, and for a sign that is spoken against (and a sword will pierce through your own soul also), that thoughts out of many hearts may be revealed.” And there was a prophetess, Anna, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher; she was of a great age, having lived with her husband seven years from her virginity, and as a widow till she was eighty-four. She did not depart from the temple, worshiping with fasting and prayer night and day. And coming up at that very hour she gave thanks to God, and spoke of him to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem. And when they had performed everything according to the law of the Lord, they returned into Galilee, to their own city, Nazareth. And the child grew and became strong, filled with wisdom; and the favor of God was upon him.

Regarding Simeon and Anna, Pope Benedict XVI said,

Even the priests proved incapable of recognizing the signs of the new and special presence of the Messiah and Saviour. Alone two elderly people, Simeon and Anna, discover this great newness. Led by the Holy Spirit, in this Child they find the fulfilment of their long waiting and watchfulness. They both contemplate the light of God that comes to illuminate the world and their prophetic gaze is opened to the future in the proclamation of the Messiah: “Lumen ad revelationem gentium!” (Lk 2:32). The prophetic attitude of the two elderly people contains the entire Old Covenant which expresses the joy of the encounter with the Redeemer. Upon seeing the Child, Simeon and Anna understood that he was the Awaited One.

“… while we are still at the dawn of Jesus’ life, we are already oriented to Calvary. It is on the Cross that Jesus will be definitively confirmed as a sign of contradiction, and it is there that his Mother’s heart will be pierced by the sword of sorrow. We are told it all from the beginning, on the 40th day after Jesus’ birth, on the feast of the Presentation of Jesus in the Temple, so important in the Church’s liturgy.” - Pope St. John Paul II

This is a Hebrew name that means “he has heard” or “God has heard.”

When is St. Simeon’s feast day?

The Church celebrates his feast day on the day after Candlemas, February 3.

In Hebrew navi, a prophet is one who tells, a spokesperson of God, speaking divine truth, or foretelling what will be the consequences for the future. On both counts, Simeon was a prophet, who revealed the truth about who Jesus was, as well as the implications for Israel, for Jesus Himself and for Mary.

Originally taken from the Hebrew name Hannah, it means “favor” or “grace.”

When is St. Anna’s feast day?

Anna the Prophetess shares a feast day with St. Simeon on February 3.

“In the encounter between the old man Simeon and Mary, a young mother, the Old and New Testaments come together in a wondrous way in giving thanks for the gift of the light that shone in the darkness and has prevented it from prevailing: Christ the Lord.” - Pope Benedict XVI

St. Simeon offered this prayer,

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word; for mine eyes have seen thy salvation which thou hast prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and for glory to thy people Israel. (Luke 2:29-32)

Called the Nunc Dimittis, for the first words in the Latin Vulgate, it is one of the three major Canticles used in the Church’s liturgy. It is said each evening at the end of Night Prayer, the last Divine Office of the Liturgy of the Hours, or Breviary. The other Canticles are that of Zechariah, used for Lauds or Morning Prayer, and of Mary (the Magnificat), used for Vespers or Evening Prayer.

After speaking of Jesus, St. Simeon then spoke to Mary of her role of accompanying her Son in His redemptive suffering. Simeon reveals, as well, Mary’s own mission of intercession and compassion for us, her spiritual children.

Behold, this child is set for the fall and rising of many in Israel, and for a sign that is spoken against (and a sword will pierce through your own soul also), that thoughts out of many hearts may be revealed. (Luke 2:34-35)

“This is the meeting point of the two Testaments, Old and New. Jesus enters the ancient temple; he who is the new Temple of God: he comes to visit his people, thus bringing to fulfilment obedience to the Law and ushering in the last times of salvation.” - Pope Benedict XVI

Anna is the prophetess who saw the Holy Family at the Presentation of Jesus at the temple. The Gospel of Luke 2:36-38 tells us about Anna:

And there was a prophetess, Anna, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher; she was of a great age, having lived with her husband seven years from her virginity, and as a widow till she was eighty-four. She did not depart from the temple, worshiping with fasting and prayer night and day. And coming up at that very hour she gave thanks to God, and spoke of him to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem.

The purification was ritual, preparatory to worship, in this case after the momentous events of childbirth and the time of rest or “laying in” afterwards. Thus, the Jewish priest purified himself by bathing before entering the holy place, and, similarly, the priest at Mass washes his hands before beginning the Eucharistic Prayer and handing the Body and Blood of Christ.

Mary, although morally pure, fulfilled her religious obligations by being purified 40 days after Jesus’ birth. Throughout her life, the Blessed Mother was always obedient to God’s Will, in this case expressed through the laws given to Israel through Moses.

“Simeon’s words seem like a second Annunciation to Mary, for they tell her of the actual historical situation in which the Son is to accomplish his mission, namely, in misunderstanding and sorrow. While this announcement on the one hand confirms her faith in the accomplishment of the divine promises of salvation, on the other hand it also reveals to her that she will have to live her obedience of faith in suffering, at the side of the suffering Savior, and that her motherhood will be mysterious and sorrowful.” — Pope St. John Paul II

This is the day when candles are blessed in the Church and traditionally have been lit in celebration of the feast.

Pope St. John Paul II said, “Christian traditions of the East and West have been interwoven, enriching the liturgy of this feast with a special procession in which the light of candles both large and small is a symbol of Christ, the true Light who came to illumine his people and all peoples.”

Candlemas is celebrated 40 days after Christmas. According to Leviticus 12, women should be purified 40 days after a son’s birth (33 days after the boy’s circumcision) and 80 days after a daughter’s birth. The purification was ritual, and preparatory to worship, in this case after the momentous events of childbirth and the time of rest or “laying in” afterwards.

In the Ordinary Form of the Latin Rite, the liturgical forms and calendar as revised after the Second Vatican Council, the last day of the Christmas Season is the Baptism of Our Lord, when His hidden life ended and His public ministry began.

However, the Church maintains an Extraordinary Form of the Latin Rite which utilizes the forms and calendar in use prior to the Council. In this usage, the Christmas Season continues until the Feast of the Presentation. Many Catholics, therefore, maintain their Christmas decorations through Candlemas.

Videos About Presentation of the Lord

Pope St. John Paul II said,

The prophetic words spoken by the aged Simeon shed light on the mission of the Child brought to the temple by his parents: “Behold this child is set for the fall and rising of many in Israel, and for a sign that is spoken against ... that thoughts out of many hearts may be revealed” (Lk 2:34-35). To Mary Simeon said: “And a sword will pierce through your own soul also” (Lk 2:35). The hymns of Bethlehem have now faded and the cross of Golgotha can already be glimpsed; this happens in the temple, the place where sacrifices are offered. The event we are commemorating today is thus a bridge as it were, linking the two most important seasons of the Church's year.

Pancakes are the traditional choice on Candlemas. In Mexico, people eat tamales on this feast day, and in France, they eat crepes.

What are the Joyful Mysteries of the Rosary?

The Joyful Mysteries include:

  • The Annunciation
  • The Visitation
  • The Nativity of Our Lord
  • The Presentation in the Temple
  • The Finding of Jesus in the Temple

The Presentation is celebrated in the Church as the World Day for Consecrated Life. Pope St. John Paul II instituted this annual celebration in 1997 as a day of prayer for religious men and women and other consecrated persons. This recalls the special offering which they have made to the Lord through their vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. In Rome, the Holy Father celebrates a special Mass for them at St. Peter’s, which the religious living in Rome attend.

Pope Benedict XVI said,

The Presentation of Jesus in the Temple is an eloquent image of the total gift of one’s life for all those, men and women, who are called to represent “the characteristic features of Jesus — the chaste, poor and obedient one” (Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation, Vita Consecrata, n. 1) in the Church and in the world, through the evangelical counsels. For this reason Venerable John Paul II chose today’s Feast to celebrate the Annual World Day of Consecrated Life.

the presentation in the bible

> > Presentation
Presentation
• • • • • • • • 1. ( ) The act of presenting, or the state of being presented; a setting forth; an offering; bestowal.

2. ( ) exhibition; representation; display; appearance; semblance; show.

3. ( ) That which is presented or given; a present; a gift, as, the picture was a presentation.

4. ( ) The act of offering a clergyman to the bishop or ordinary for institution in a benefice; the right of presenting a clergyman.

5. ( ) The particular position of the child during labor relatively to the passage though which it is to be brought forth; -- specifically designated by the part which first appears at the mouth of the uterus; as, a breech presentation.
offering up. From prosphero; ; concretely, an oblation (bloodless) or
sacrifice -- offering (up). see GREEK prosphero. (prosphora) -- 4 Occurrences.

Or mishloach {mish-lo'-akh}; also mishlach {mish-lawkh'}; from shalach; a sending
out, ie (abstractly) (favorable), or seizure (unfavorable); also


Feminine of 'asham; guiltiness, a fault, the of a sin-offering -- offend,
sin, (cause of) trespass(-ing, offering). see HEBREW 'asham. 818, 819.

of the Church by Christ to Himself.
Chapter Eight The Churchward Results of the Redeemer's Return 6. The
of the Church by Christ to Himself. When every

of this Doctrine is Especially Necessary, if it
THESIS 20 The of this doctrine is especially necessary, if
it is treated skillfully? The of this doctrine

of the Blessed virgin in the Temple
III. THE OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN IN THE TEMPLE. 1. PREPARATION
IN ST. ANNE'S HOUSE. [On October 28 ^th, 1821, Catherine

of the Blessed virgin, or on the Octave of Her
THE INNER WAY SERMON XIV On the of the Blessed Virgin, or on the Octave
of Her Nativity. Of two ways in which men come to the Blessed Virgin.

of Jesus, and the "Nunc Dimittis. " Ch. 2:21-40
II. THE BIRTH AND CHILDHOOD OF JESUS. CHS. 1:5 TO 2:52 F. The
of Jesus, and the "Nunc Dimittis." Ch. 2:21-40. 21 And

of Christ, or Purification of St. Mary
II. THE CHRISTIAN YEAR The of Christ, or Purification of St. Mary.
[1026]273 In his temple now behold him [1027]274 Hail to the Lord who comes.

in the Temple. Lord, Now Lettest Thou Thy Servant
in the Temple. Lord, now lettest Thou Thy servant depart in peace,
according to Thy word; for mine eyes have seen Thy salvation.

in the Temple.
THE BIRTH AND INFANCY OF JESUS THE IN THE TEMPLE. And when the
days of their purification according to the law of Moses


II. THE CHRISTIAN YEAR Holy Days: The of Christ, or Purification of
St. Mary 273. Lo, the incarnate God most high! Jesus, by thy ,.


II. THE CHRISTIAN YEAR Holy Days: The of Christ, or Purification
of St. Mary 274. Hail to the Lord who comes. Six 6's
(3 Occurrences)
3. (n.) That which is presented or given; a present; a gift, as, the picture was
a . Multi-Version Concordance (3 Occurrences).


Matthew 12:4 how he went into the house of God, and the loaves of the
did eat, which it is not lawful to him to eat, nor to those with him, except


2. (a.) Admitting of the of a clergiman; as, a church presentable.
Multi-Version Concordance Presentable (2 Occurrences).


KING, CHRIST AS. " I. THE REALITY OF CHRIST'S KINGSHIP 1. The Old Testament
Foreshadowings In the Psalms and Prophets 2. The Gospel (1) Christ's


Minchah: "meal offering" (the Revised Version), "meat offering" (the King James
Version), a gift or , at first applied to both bloody and unbloody


NEW TESTAMENT TERMS 1. Instruction 2. Acquisition 3. 4. Elucidation
5. Exposition 6. Authority 7. Care 8. Supervision III.


NEW TESTAMENT TERMS 1. Instruction 2. Acquisition 3. 4. Elucidation
5. Exposition 6. Authority 7. Care 8. Supervision III.


NEW TESTAMENT TERMS 1. Instruction 2. Acquisition 3. 4. Elucidation
5. Exposition 6. Authority 7. Care 8. Supervision III.


For doctrine has need to be purged of the historic inconsistencies, and fatal
illogicalities, with which, in its older forms of , it was often


BIBLICAL OF THE DOCTRINE OF PROVIDENCE 1. Divine Providence in the
Old Testament Scriptures (1) Providence in the Pentateuch (2) The Historical









• • • • Presentation (3 Occurrences)


how he went into the house of God, and the loaves of the presentation did eat, which it is not lawful to him to eat, nor to those with him, except to the priests alone?
(YLT)


how he went into the house of God, (at 'Abiathar the chief priest,') and the loaves of the presentation did eat, which it is not lawful to eat, except to the priests, and he gave also to those who were with him?'
(YLT)


how he went into the house of God, and the loaves of the presentation did take, and did eat, and gave also to those with him, which it is not lawful to eat, except only to the priests?'
(YLT)

Presentable

An Order for the Presentation of Bibles

P: The following persons are being presented a Bible, the gift of this congregation. (Their names are read.)

At the time of your baptism, your parents and sponsors promised faithfully to bring you to the services of God's house, to teach you the Lord's Prayer, the Creed, and the Ten Commandments, to place in your hands, the Holy Scriptures, and to provide for your instruction in the Christian faith, that, living in the covenant of your Baptism and in communion with the Church, you may lead a godly life/lives until the day of Jesus Christ.

The psalmist writes: " Your word is a lantern to my feet and a light to my path " (Ps. 119:105).

The apostle Paul wrote to the Church at Rome: "Whatever was written in former days was written for your instruction, that by your steadfastness and by the encouragement of the scriptures we might have hope" (Rom. 15:4).

And the Reformers, writing in the Formula of Concord, inform us: " We believe, teach, and confess that the prophetic and apostolic writings of the Old and New Testaments are the only rule and norm according to which all doctrines and teachers alike must be appraised and judged " (FC Epl).

Now, on behalf of ______ Church, of which you are a member by Baptism, I present you with a copy of the Holy Bible. As the apostle wrote to Timothy: " Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth" (2 Tim. 2:15).

The congregation shall stand.

P: The Lord be with you. C: And also with you. P: Let us pray: Blessed Lord, you speak to us through the Holy Scriptures. Grant that we may hear, read, respect, learn, and make them our own in such a way that the enduring benefit and comfort of the Word will help us grasp and hold the blessed hope of everlasting life, given us through our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

Daily Reflections Videos

the presentation in the bible

The Feast of the Presentation of the Lord

"A Light of Revelation to the Gentiles"

  • Holy Days and Holidays
  • Beliefs and Teachings
  • Christianity Origins
  • The New Testament
  • The Old Testament
  • Practical Tools for Christians
  • Christian Life For Teens
  • Christian Prayers
  • Inspirational Bible Devotions
  • Denominations of Christianity
  • Christian Holidays
  • Christian Entertainment
  • Key Terms in Christianity
  • Latter Day Saints

Known originally as the Feast of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin, the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord is a relatively ancient celebration. The Church at Jerusalem observed the feast as early as the first half of the fourth century, and likely earlier. The feast celebrates the presentation of Christ in the temple at Jerusalem on the 40th day after His birth.

Quick Facts

  • Date:  February 2
  • Type of Feast:  Feast
  • Readings:  Malachi 3:1-4; Psalm 24:7, 8, 9, 10; Hebrews 2:14-18; Luke 2:22-40 ( full text here )
  • Prayers:   Nunc  Dimities , the Canticle of Simeon (Luke 2:29-32); see below
  • Other Names for the Feast:  Candlemas, the Feast of the Purification of the Virgin, the Meeting of the Lord, the Presentation of Jesus in the Temple

History of the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord

According to Jewish law, the firstborn male child belonged to God, and the parents had to "buy him back" on the 40th day after his birth, by offering a sacrifice of "a pair of turtledoves, or two young pigeons" ( Luke 2:24 ) in the temple (thus the "presentation" of the child). On that same day, the mother would be ritually purified (thus the "purification").

Saint Mary and Saint Joseph kept this law, even though, since Saint Mary remained a virgin after the birth of Christ, she would not have had to go through ritual purification. In his gospel, Luke recounts the story ( Luke 2:22-39 ).

When Christ was presented in the temple, "there was a man in Jerusalem named Simeon, and this man was just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel" ( Luke 2:25 ) When Saint Mary and Saint Joseph brought Christ to the temple, Simeon embraced the Child and prayed the Canticle of Simeon:

Now thou dost dismiss thy servant, O Lord, according to thy word in peace; because my eyes have seen thy salvation, which thou hast prepared before the face of all peoples: a light to the revelation of the Gentiles, and the glory of thy people Israel ( Luke 2:29-32 ).

The Original Date of the Presentation

Originally, the feast was celebrated on February 14, the 40th day after Epiphany (January 6), because Christmas wasn't yet celebrated as its own feast, and so the Nativity, Epiphany, the Baptism of the Lord (Theophany), and the feast celebrating Christ's first miracle at the wedding in Cana were all celebrated on the same day. By the last quarter of the fourth century, however, the Church at Rome had begun to celebrate the Nativity on December 25, so the Feast of the Presentation was moved to February 2, 40 days later.

Why Candlemas?

Inspired by the words of the Canticle of Simeon ("a light to the revelation of the Gentiles"), by the 11th century, the custom had developed in the West of blessing candles on the Feast of the Presentation. The candles were then lit, and a procession took place through the darkened church while the Canticle of Simeon was sung. Because of this, the feast also became known as Candlemas. While the procession and blessing of the candles is not often performed in the United States today, Candlemas is still an important feast in many European countries.

Candlemas and Groundhog Day

This emphasis on light, as well as the timing of the feast, falling as it does in the last weeks of winter, led to another, secular holiday celebrated in the United States on the same date: Groundhog Day. You can learn more about the connection between the religious holiday and the secular one in Why Did the Groundhog See His Shadow?

  • Meditations on the Joyful Mysteries of the Rosary
  • How Long Did Jesus Live on Earth?
  • Introduction to the Catholic Religion: Beliefs, Practices, and History
  • Scripture Readings for the First Week of Advent
  • Scripture Readings for the Second Week of Advent
  • The Feast of the Baptism of the Lord
  • The Epiphany of Our Lord Jesus Christ
  • The Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary
  • When Does the Christmas Season Start?
  • When Is Christmas Day?
  • The Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary
  • What Are the 12 Days of Christmas?
  • The Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God
  • Is New Year's a Holy Day of Obligation?
  • The Annunciation of the Lord
  • The Feast of the Immaculate Conception

OpenBible.info Geocoding Topical  Bible Labs Blog

What does the Bible say about ?

A ‣ B ‣ C ‣ D ‣ E ‣ F ‣ G ‣ H ‣ I ‣ J ‣ K ‣ L ‣ M ‣ N ‣ O ‣ P ‣ Q ‣ R ‣ S ‣ T ‣ U ‣ V ‣ W ‣ Y ‣ Z

17 Bible Verses about Proposal Presentation In Bible

John 3:16 esv / 3 helpful votes helpful not helpful.

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.

2 Peter 3:9 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance.

Colossians 4:1-18 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

Masters, treat your bondservants justly and fairly, knowing that you also have a Master in heaven. Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving. At the same time, pray also for us, that God may open to us a door for the word, to declare the mystery of Christ, on account of which I am in prison— that I may make it clear, which is how I ought to speak. Walk in wisdom toward outsiders, making the best use of the time. ...

Colossians 3:17 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.

Colossians 3:1-25 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

If then you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth. For you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ who is your life appears, then you also will appear with him in glory. Put to death therefore what is earthly in you: sexual immorality, impurity, passion, evil desire, and covetousness, which is idolatry. ...

Colossians 2:1-23 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

For I want you to know how great a struggle I have for you and for those at Laodicea and for all who have not seen me face to face, that their hearts may be encouraged, being knit together in love, to reach all the riches of full assurance of understanding and the knowledge of God's mystery, which is Christ, in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. I say this in order that no one may delude you with plausible arguments. For though I am absent in body, yet I am with you in spirit, rejoicing to see your good order and the firmness of your faith in Christ. ...

Colossians 1:1-29 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and Timothy our brother, To the saints and faithful brothers in Christ at Colossae: Grace to you and peace from God our Father. We always thank God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, when we pray for you, since we heard of your faith in Christ Jesus and of the love that you have for all the saints, because of the hope laid up for you in heaven. Of this you have heard before in the word of the truth, the gospel, ...

Philippians 4:13 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

I can do all things through him who strengthens me.

Romans 8:28 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose.

Acts 1:8 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.”

John 11:25-26 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and everyone who lives and believes in me shall never die. Do you believe this?”

John 3:16-17 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.

John 3:2 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

This man came to Jesus by night and said to him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him.”

Jeremiah 29:11 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord , plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.

Isaiah 43:2 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you; when you walk through fire you shall not be burned, and the flame shall not consume you.

Isaiah 41:10 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

Fear not, for I am with you; be not dismayed, for I am your God; I will strengthen you, I will help you, I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.

Isaiah 40:31 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

But they who wait for the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint.

Suggest a Verse

Enter a verse reference (e.g., john 3:16-17 ).

Visit the Bible online to search for words if you don’t know the specific passage your’re looking for.

Unless otherwise indicated, all content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License . All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. Copyright ©2001 by Crossway Bibles , a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Contact me: openbibleinfo (at) gmail.com.

5 Myths about the Pro-Life Movement

the presentation in the bible

This article is part of the 5 Myths series.

​Myth #1: The pro-life movement has won now that Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey have been struck down by the Supreme Court.

The good news is that with Roe and Casey out of the way, nine unelected judges on the Supreme Court no longer have sole legal authority to determine abortion policy. Rather, the individual states will now decide how the practice is governed. Put simply, the American people—your friends, your classmates, your coworkers, and your family members—will now decide if unborn humans enjoy the same legal protections as you and me. The bad news is that the worldview assumptions that make abortion plausible to millions of our fellow citizens are deeply entrenched in the culture and aren’t going away anytime soon. Reversing bad Supreme Court decisions, while necessary, is not sufficient for winning the day. If you think I’m kidding, consider that since Roe and Casey were struck in June 2022 (a good thing), pro-lifers have lost every single time the abortion issue has been put directly to the public for a vote. Even in a red state like Montana, voters rejected a modest ballot measure that did not ban abortion outright, but only protected children who survive abortion procedures and are born alive. A larger March for Life isn’t going to fix the problem at the ballot box. More pregnancy centers won’t fix it. To position ourselves for eventual political victory, the kind that results in legal protection for unborn humans, we must engage the public with a persuasive case for life that confronts abortion at the worldview level. That means all pro-life Christians must learn to persuasively make a case for life—at school, the university, and the workplace.

The Case for Life

The Case for Life

Scott klusendorf.

The pro-life message can compete in the marketplace of ideas, provided Christians properly understand and articulate that message. Featuring additional content, this second edition helps pro-life Christians make a persuasive case for the lives of the unborn. 

Myth #2: The pro-life movement should be about reducing abortion rather than political action to ban it.

This myth presents a false choice. Why can’t we do both? All pro-lifers rejoice when abortion numbers drop. But merely reducing abortion is not enough. For example, a society that reduces spousal abuse but leaves it legal for men to beat their wives remains a deeply immoral society that rejects the intrinsic dignity of women as fellow image bearers. Make no mistake: pro-life victory is not achieved because pregnant women have their felt needs met or people come to dislike abortion, though we hope both happen. It is achieved when unborn humans enjoy the same protections in law as you and I do. Put simply, in a constitutional republic like ours, the people are the sovereign. God holds human sovereigns responsible for upholding justice for the weak and vulnerable (Psalm 82:1–4; 58:1–11; Romans 13:1–7). Therefore, God holds us responsible to do what we can to legally protect the weak and vulnerable, including the unborn.

All pro-life Christians must learn to persuasively make a case for life—at school, the university, and the workplace.

Myth #3: Pro-life advocates should refrain from using abortion pictures in public presentations.

It’s bad enough when pro-abortionists cover up the evil they want to enshrine. It’s counter-productive to the cause when our side helps them do it. When we refuse to use abortion victim imagery in pro-life presentations, we are stripping ourselves of our most effective tool both in terms of persuading critics and inspiring our own people to greater sacrifice. Visual depictions of abortion are controversial, but they reawaken moral intuitions and convey truths in ways that words alone cannot. As pro-life veteran Gregg Cunningham points out, “When we show pictures of abortion, abortion protests itself.” The pictures, Cunningham argues, change how people feel about abortion as a predicate to changing how they think and ultimately behave.

I realize that some may object to abortion victim images on grounds that they substitute emotion for reason and therefore should not be used in public presentations. But this objection misses the point entirely. The question is not, Are the pictures emotional? They are. The real question is, Are the pictures true? If so, they ought to be admitted as evidence. We ought to avoid empty appeals to emotion—those offered in place of good reasons. If, however, the pictures substantiate the reasons being offered and do not obscure them, they serve a vital purpose. Truth is the issue. The pro-life movement must stop apologizing for exposing what is being done to unborn humans. Effective pro-lifers can use pictures to reframe the debate and reawaken the moral conscience of the nation. Although the pictures are difficult to look at, they convey truth in a way that words never can.

Myth #4: The pro-life movement hates women.

Pro-life laws, so the argument goes, prevent women from getting life-saving surgeries needed to fix ectopic pregnancy and other threats. At the same time, pro-life laws mean that women who suffer miscarriage will be prosecuted for murder. These are outright lies. As reported in a state-by-state analysis by Secular Pro-life, “Nowhere in the entire United States is it illegal to perform triage on a pregnant woman, whether or not such treatment results in the death of the unborn child. Anyone claiming such treatment is an induced abortion is either ignorant or is lying.” The study further warns, “Be wary of supposed anecdotes on the internet that vaguely claim some unnamed physician at a ‘Catholic hospital’ in some state where induced abortions are banned had to stop emergency treatment to consult an attorney on legalities. In an emergency, no physician is going to desert a patient to wait for a phone call.” Meanwhile, no state law says women will be prosecuted for miscarriage. In fact, most laws expressly state women will not be!

Myth #5: The pro-life movement should be about love rather than engaging in political activism.

Let’s face it. Abortion debates can get ugly real fast. It’s no surprise that many of our fellow citizens want the controversy to just go away. As one piece that circulates during election cycles states, “It’s easy to forget that Jesus said the greatest commandments are to love God and each other. I wish we loved enough to stop demonizing.” Fair enough. But does “we” and “other” include the unborn? And if so, does “love” stand aside politically while he’s legally murdered? Pro-lifers stand alone in our calling to save children. How can we not act like it?

  • https://secularprolife.org/2022/12/do-prolife-laws-endanger-womens-lives/

Scott Klusendorf is the author of The Case for Life: Equipping Christians to Engage the Culture .

Scott Klusendorf

Scott Klusendorf  (MA, Biola University) is the president of Life Training Institute, where he trains pro-life advocates to persuasively defend their views. A passionate and engaging platform speaker, Scott's pro-life presentations have been featured by Focus on the Family, Truths That Transform, and American Family Radio.

Popular Articles in This Series

the presentation in the bible

5 Myths about Angels and Demons

Sadly, there is a lot of confusion about angels and demons and certain myths that simply won’t die. Here are five of them.

the presentation in the bible

5 Myths about Calvinism

Greg Forster

In all the areas of theology where Calvin made his most distinguishing contributions, we see the exaltation of the work of the Spirit driving his analysis.

the presentation in the bible

5 Myths about Marriage

Paul David Tripp

People are susceptible to believing all sorts of misconceptions about the purposes and practices of marriage.

the presentation in the bible

5 Myths about Depression

Michael S. Lundy

Depression can be quite as fiery a trial as any other. The good news is that God does indeed hear the cry of the afflicted.

Related Resources

The Story of Abortion in America

Connect with Us!

  • Retail Partners
  • International Distributors
  • About the ESV
  • Read Online
  • Mobile Apps
  • Crossway Review Program
  • Exam Copies
  • History of Crossway
  • Statement of Faith
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms of Service
  • Submissions
  • Permissions

© 2001 – 2024 Crossway, USA

the presentation in the bible

IMAGES

  1. Presentation of the Lord at the Temple

    the presentation in the bible

  2. TEMPLE

    the presentation in the bible

  3. Feast of the Presentation of the Lord

    the presentation in the bible

  4. Holy Mass images...: Presentation of Jesus at the Temple

    the presentation in the bible

  5. Christ Presented to Simeon at the Temple

    the presentation in the bible

  6. the presentation bible verse

    the presentation in the bible

VIDEO

  1. How to Present Bible Verse & Song Lyrics in Church (Screens & Projector) @SannidhiDigitals

  2. An Urgent Plea for Help

  3. The Presentation (part I)

  4. "You Need to Make a U-Turn"

  5. Follow Jesus

  6. Free PowerPoint Sermon: The Bible is Pictures of Jesus

COMMENTS

  1. Luke 2:22-38 NABRE

    The Presentation in the Temple. When the days were completed for their purification according to the law of Moses, they took him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord, just as it is written in the law of the Lord, "Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord," and to offer the sacrifice of "a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons," in accordance with the ...

  2. The Deeper Meaning of the Presentation in the Temple

    Rather, the Presentation took place in order to fulfill two different dictates of the Mosaic Law. The first of these, drawn from Leviticus 12, mandated that mothers needed to be purified forty days after giving birth to a male child. This is why the Presentation is celebrated in the Church's calendar on February 2nd—also known as ...

  3. The Presentation of Jesus

    Upon the eighth day following His birth, the Lord was Luke ii. 21. circumcised, and the name Jesus given Him. Forty days after the birth, Mary presented herself with the child Luke ii. 22-38. at the Temple in accordance with the law, and after the presentation returned again to Bethlehem.. The order of events following Christ's birth to the time He went to reside at Nazareth, is much disputed.

  4. Presentation of Jesus

    The Presentation of Jesus is an early episode in the life of Jesus Christ, describing his presentation at the Temple in Jerusalem.It is celebrated by many churches 40 days after Christmas on Candlemas, or the "Feast of the Presentation of Jesus".The episode is described in chapter 2 of the Gospel of Luke in the New Testament. Within the account, "Luke's narration of the Presentation in the ...

  5. 13. The Presentation of Jesus in the Temple in Jerusalem

    30 For my eyes have seen Your salvation, 31 Which You have prepared in the presence of all peoples, 32 A L IGHT OF REVELATION TO THE G ENTILES, And the glory of Your people Israel.". 33 And His father and mother were amazed at the things which were being said about Him. 34 And Simeon blessed them and said to Mary His mother, "Behold, this ...

  6. Presentation in the Bible (33 instances)

    Tools. He put all these in the hands of Aaron and his sons and waved them before the Lord as a presentation offering. HCSB. Verse Concepts. Lev 8:29. Tools. He also took the breast and waved it before the Lord as a presentation offering; it was Moses' portion of the ordination ram as the Lord had commanded him.

  7. The Presentation of Jesus

    The Song of Simeon. To me the heart of the Presentation is the Song of Simeon: Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace, according to your word; for my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles. and for glory to your people Israel.

  8. The Presentation of the Lord

    The Presentation of the Lord. (Malachi 3: 1-4, Psalm 24: 7-10, Hebrews 2: 14-18, Luke 2: 22-40) St. Ignatius of Loyola taught a method of prayer in which we pray by imaginatively entering a scene from scripture. Doing this enables us to be touched by God in a way that gives us "our daily bread" from God—a meaning from the story that ...

  9. What Does the Bible Say About Presentation In The Temple?

    Bible verses about Presentation In The Temple. Luke 2:22-40 ESV / 3 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful. And when the time came for their purification according to the Law of Moses, they brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord (as it is written in the Law of the Lord, "Every male who first opens the womb shall be called holy to the Lord") and to offer a sacrifice according to ...

  10. The Presentation in the Temple.

    The Presentation in the Temple. His Life — William E. Barton. And when the days of their purification according to the law of Moses were fulfilled, they brought him up to Jerusalem, to present him to the Lord (as it is written in the law of the Lord, Every male that openeth the womb shall be called holy to the Lord), and to offer a sacrifice ...

  11. The Presentation in the Temple

    1. Realize that we are ever being presented in the Temple of God through our union with our Head, even Jesus Christ. 2. Realize this especially in the Holy Eucharist, in which we plead before our Father the one perfect and sufficient sacrifice and oblation for the sins of the whole world, and at the same time, sharing in His life, we offer and ...

  12. What Does the Bible Say About The Presentation Of Jesus?

    And behold, there appeared to them Moses and Elijah, talking with him. And Peter said to Jesus, "Lord, it is good that we are here. If you wish, I will make three tents here, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.". He was still speaking when, behold, a bright cloud overshadowed them, and a voice from the cloud said, "This is ...

  13. Luke 2:22-40 NIV

    Jesus Presented in the Temple. 22 When the time came for the purification rites required by the Law of Moses, Joseph and Mary took him to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord 23 (as it is written in the Law of the Lord, "Every firstborn male is to be consecrated to the Lord"[ a]), 24 and to offer a sacrifice in keeping with what is said in ...

  14. 10 Powerful Quotes on the Presentation of the Lord

    1. God sent His Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order to redeem those who were under the law. (Galatians 4:4-5) 2. Mary hurries toward the place of sacrifice and holds the beloved Victim in her arms. (Alphonsus Liguori) 3. She enters the Temple, approaches the altar, and there, unassumingly, humbly and devoutly presents Him to the ...

  15. Feast of the Presentation of the Lord

    Mary and Joseph took Jesus up to Jerusalem. to present him to the Lord, just as it is written in the law of the Lord, Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord, and to offer the sacrifice of. a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons, in accordance with the dictate in the law of the Lord.

  16. What Does the Bible Say About Presenting The Gospel?

    John 10:1-42 ESV / 2 helpful votesHelpfulNot Helpful. "Truly, truly, I say to you, he who does not enter the sheepfold by the door but climbs in by another way, that man is a thief and a robber. But he who enters by the door is the shepherd of the sheep. To him the gatekeeper opens. The sheep hear his voice, and he calls his own sheep by name ...

  17. Presentation of the Lord

    The Catechism of the Catholic Church (paragraph 529) teaches, The presentation of Jesus in the temple shows him to be the firstborn Son who belongs to the Lord. With Simeon and Anna, all Israel awaits its encounter with the Savior-the name given to this event in the Byzantine tradition. Jesus is recognized as the long-expected Messiah, the ...

  18. Topical Bible: Presentation

    Presentation (3 Occurrences) Matthew 12:4 how he went into the house of God, and the loaves of the presentation did eat, which it is not lawful to him to eat, nor to those with him, except to the priests alone? (YLT) Mark 2:26 how he went into the house of God, (at 'Abiathar the chief priest,') and the loaves of the presentation did eat, which it is not lawful to eat, except to the priests ...

  19. Presentation of Bibles

    An Order for the Presentation of Bibles. P: The following persons are being presented a Bible, the gift of this congregation. (Their names are read.) At the time of your baptism, your parents and sponsors promised faithfully to bring you to the services of God's house, to teach you the Lord's Prayer, the Creed, and the Ten Commandments, to ...

  20. What Does the Bible Say About Presentation?

    Bible verses about Presentation. 1 Peter 3:18-20 ESV / 2 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful. For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit, in which he went and proclaimed to the spirits in prison, because they formerly did not obey, when God's patience waited in the days of ...

  21. Daily Reflections Videos

    2024 05 01 Reflection 287. Daily Bible Readings, Podcast Audio and Videos and Prayers brought to you by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

  22. Fans Approve of 2024 Daytime Emmys In Memoriam

    Jun 7, 2024. With a special tribute presentation, the 2024 Daytime Emmy Awards remembered the stars and legends the industry has lost this year. A solemn in memoriam segment had the audience in ...

  23. The Feast of the Presentation of the Lord (Candlemas)

    The Original Date of the Presentation . Originally, the feast was celebrated on February 14, the 40th day after Epiphany (January 6), because Christmas wasn't yet celebrated as its own feast, and so the Nativity, Epiphany, the Baptism of the Lord (Theophany), and the feast celebrating Christ's first miracle at the wedding in Cana were all celebrated on the same day.

  24. What Does the Bible Say About Proposal Presentation In Bible?

    Colossians 4:1-18 ESV / 2 helpful votesHelpfulNot Helpful. Masters, treat your bondservants justly and fairly, knowing that you also have a Master in heaven. Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving. At the same time, pray also for us, that God may open to us a door for the word, to declare the mystery of Christ ...

  25. 5 Myths about the Pro-Life Movement

    This article is part of the 5 Myths series. Myth #1: The pro-life movement has won now that Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey have been struck down by the Supreme Court. The good news is that with Roe and Casey out of the way, nine unelected judges on the Supreme Court no longer have sole legal authority to determine abortion policy.

  26. Presenting and Blessing Bibles: Liturgy and Prayers

    Presentation and Blessing of Bibles. Presider:Receive the gift of this Bible so that the story of God and God's people may be with you at home, church, or wherever you shall choose to carry it. Enjoy reading how God is at work in nature and history. Learn about the life and teachings of Jesus. Be open to how God may continue to speak to you ...