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Essay on Untouchability

The idea of the caste system is deeply embedded within Indian culture. It's known as one of the oldest civilisations on Earth, with over four thousand years under its belt. However, some scholars argue that this social structure was introduced around 500 BC when they were invaded by Aryan tribes from Central Asia, who brought their rigid class system into play shortly after settling down in the region.

As per tradition, once a person belongs to a specific caste - Brahmin (priests), Kshatriya (Kings/Warriors), Vaishya (traders) or Shudra (farmers and service providers) - he or she is stuck there for life and can never cross over to another rung on the ladder, regardless of individual talent or effort. This is what's known as untouchability which is still prevalent in India today.

Ways to Achieve Untouchability

There are several ways in which one can achieve untouchability. One way is by violating the caste rules and regulations, for example, by marrying someone from a different caste or eating meat (which is strictly forbidden). Another way is by performing unclean tasks such as scavenging or cleaning latrines - jobs that are traditionally reserved for Dalits, also known as "the Untouchables". And lastly, it's possible to become untouchable simply by being born into a low-caste family. Regardless of how it's achieved, the consequences are always the same: social isolation, discrimination and a lifetime of poverty.

Is Untouchability Necessary?

There is no easy answer when it comes to the question of whether or not untouchability is important. On the one hand, you could argue that this discriminatory practice is a violation of human rights and should be abolished immediately. After all, how can we claim to be a civilised society when some of our citizens are treated as second-class citizens? On the other hand, defenders of the caste system might say that it's an essential part of Indian culture and should be preserved at all costs. They would argue that without the caste system, India would descend into chaos and anarchy - a fate worse than death!

The truth probably lies somewhere in between these two extremes. Untouchability is a harmful and unjust practice that needs to be eradicated. However, we can't just abolish it overnight and expect things to go smoothly. There would likely be a period in which chaos and violence erupt on the streets as people fight over power and resources (sound familiar).

The definition of Untouchability has varied from period to period. Untouchability has been practised from ancient times, dating back to 1500-800 BC. Untouchability is an old concept that has been practised throughout history. It could be defined as the segregation of the group of people from the mainstream based on their caste and subcaste.

The untouchables were called by different names in different times, such as in the Vedic period, they were called ‘Chandala’.In Medieval times they were known as the ‘Achhuta’ and during British rule, they were called “Exterior Caste” or “Depressed Castes”.

The practise of untouchability is based on the caste system in which the untouchables come under the last varna known as Avarnas, which means not belonging to any caste. People belonging to Avarna were given jobs that had no dignity such as gutter cleaners, scavengers, watchmen, sweepers, cleaning animals such as pigs and cows, etc. People of the caste Avarnas are now called Dalits in modern times. They are also known as the “Scheduled Castes”, the name given by the Indian Constitution for their upliftment and development. 

Seeing the oppression, the Dalits have faced from society, the government has passed acts that protect them from future violence. Protection of Civil Rights Act 1955  was passed to protect those subjected to untouchability and Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes Act 1955  was also passed to provide financial and legal help to the lower caste. Despite the constitutional amendments and the acts passed by the government, untouchability and discrimination based on caste are still followed in many parts of the country. The Dalits living in the cities are less vulnerable compared to those living in rural areas.

The Dalits living in rural areas are not allowed to enter the village as they are believed to pollute the healthy environment of the village. Basic requirements such as drinking water, electricity, etc., are not provided as they are considered to be not good enough. The Dalits living in rural areas have accepted their faith written by such orthodox people because of the fear for their lives and there is no one to help them. The politicians are corrupt who just care about increasing their vote count and gaining power in the government even if it requires sacrificing innocent people who just want to live their life with dignity. 

Everyone in the eyes of the law is equal and discrimination in the name of caste and subcaste cannot be tolerated. The government has introduced laws that will help in uplifting the Dalits in society. The constant effort has been made to educate people living in rural areas about basic human rights and how practising untouchability directly violates them. Strict action is taken towards people who don’t allow Dalits in religious places, with no permission to drink water or eat food and beverages. It is important to educate the new generation about these evil practices as that would help in planting a seed that would grow and change the perspective of society. 

10 Strategies for Writing a Better Essay on Untouchability

Start by doing your research. Read up on the history of the caste system and understand why it's such a controversial topic and after doing that, you will be in a much better place to form an opinion.

Make sure that you understand what is meant by untouchability. It's not enough to just know the definition; it's also important to familiarise yourself with some of the different ways in which it can be achieved so that you'll have more material for your essay.

Keep your thesis clear and concise. Your thesis should summarise the main points of your essay and argue why they are significant or relevant.

Be creative when thinking of a title for your essay. This will help to capture your reader's attention right from the start.

Write in a clear, concise and easy-to-read manner. Don't overload your reader with too much information at once. Break down your points into manageable chunks and make sure that each paragraph supports your argument.

Use real-life examples to illustrate your points. This will help to make your essay more interesting and engaging.

Don't be afraid to take a stand on this controversial topic. Whether you agree or disagree with the caste system, make sure that your opinion is clear and well-argued.

Plan your essay before you start writing. This will help to ensure that your thoughts are organized and coherent.

Proofread your work carefully for mistakes. A well-written essay is always more impressive than one that is filled with spelling and grammar errors.

Get feedback from a friend or classmate. They can offer helpful insights and suggestions which will improve the quality of your essay.

Conclusion 

Everyone should remember that all people are equal in the eyes of the law, and discrimination and intolerance of others based on their caste are not entertained. There is no denying the fact that though the caste system has shaped Indian society for a longer time and possibly it is still doing it. This led to widespread persecution and genetic rights, which continue to this day. We must ensure that the measures taken to remedy the damage caused by such medieval practices will be more effective and will not create further inequality in society.

Writing an essay on Untouchability can be a little intimidating. There are many different perspectives to take into account and not enough time to cover them all. It is important that you do your research and understand the background of this topic, but what if you don't have the time.

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FAQs on Untouchability Essay

1. What is Untouchability? How Can it Be Abolished?

Untouchability is the discrimination done to a person based on the caste or subcaste. According to the untouchability law that was passed on 29th November 1949, the practice of untouchability of any kind is forbidden and is considered to be a criminal act. Strict action will be taken against people who practice untouchability. 

2. Which Article is Related to the Abolition of Untouchability?

Article 17 is related to the abolishment of untouchability. Untouchability is abolished and its practice in any form is forbidden.

3.  What was the Role of BR Ambedkar in Fighting Untouchability?

B. R. Ambedkar, was Dalit himself and he knew the harsh reality of Dalits in the society and how they were treated. He strongly condemned the practice of untouchability in India. He also fought for the abolition of the caste system in India which is considered to be the root for the discrimination which the Dalits faced. He is often referred to as the hero by many Dalits these days.

4. How should I start my essay? What are some of the different ways in which untouchability can be achieved?

Start by doing your research so that you have a clear understanding of the topic. This will help to ensure that your essay is well-informed and thought-out. There are many different ways in which untouchability can be achieved, but some of the most common include social isolation, discrimination, and a lifetime of poverty.

5. How does the caste system work?

The caste system is an ancient Hindu tradition that divides people into different social classes based on their occupation. There are four main castes (or varnas): Brahmin (priests), Kshatriya (warriors), Vaishya (merchants) and Shudra (peasants). People are born into their caste and it's impossible to change your social status.

6. How do I come up with a good title for my essay? Which perspective should I take when writing this essay?

Look through some of the books in the library or online to get inspiration for your topic. You could also ask your teacher or professor what they think would make an interesting, captivating essay. It doesn't matter which perspective you take; all that matters is that you write about an issue that is important to you and that you include reasons why people might agree or disagree with your perspective on it.

7. Why is it important that you do your research before writing an essay on Untouchability?

It's important to understand why this topic is considered controversial by many people so that you'll have more material for your essay. When you're finished with your research, make sure that you summarise what you've learned into manageable chunks so that they are easy to read for readers who aren't familiar with the topic.

8.  How can you make your essay more interesting?

Find some real-life examples that are relevant to your topic, then use these examples to support your ideas and arguments throughout the essay. This will make it easier for readers to follow what you're saying and keep their attention piqued.

9. How do I write a good introduction for my essay? How do I write an effective conclusion for my essay?

Start by writing down a list of important points that you'll want to include in the rest of the essay, then organize them so that they flow smoothly from one point to another. Make sure that there is a clear link between each point so that the final paragraph ties everything together neatly at the end of the essay. A good conclusion should do two things: summarise the main points made in the essay and leave readers with something to think about. You could also suggest ways in which the issue of untouchability could be improved or offer your own thoughts on how this problem could be solved.

Essay on Untouchability for Students and Children

500+ words essay on untouchability.

Untouchability is the practice of discriminating various individuals and groups based on their cast and the jobs done by them. Untouchability is practiced for a very long time. It works on the Indian caste system hierarchy. The untouchables usually bear inhuman treatment because they belong to the lower caste. They have been going through various kinds of discrimination in almost all places.

essay on untouchability

History of Untouchability in India

The term Dalit for the untouchables is derived from the Sanskrit which means broken or downtrodden. Some people believe that the system of untouchability only prevails in India but it is also prevalent in other countries such as Japan, Tibet, and Korea.

The castes have been derived from Vedic texts which divide people into four major groups: Brahmans – Priests and elite people, Kshatriyas – Warriors, Vaishyas – Small Businessmen and Merchants, Shudras –Sanitary workers. Thus, these differences in the people of ancient India were mostly based on caste and profession of the people.

Struggles for the Abolishment of Untouchability

After fighting for years against exercising dominance over the oppressed class, the practice of untouchability still has its marks in many societies around us. Even educated people follow these practices.

Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar and Mahatma Gandhi were among the prominent leaders who fought very hard for the abolition of the practice of untouchability. Thus, the hard work of such people gave a rightful chance to the Dalits to prove themselves and enhance the chance of equality, harmony, and brotherhood in the society.

Amendments in the Constitution

After several movements and struggles to abolish the practice of untouchability, laws were made in the constitution to accommodate the interests of the oppressed classes. Article 17 of the Indian Constitution abolished untouchability and declared it as a punishable act.  According to this, no one can restrict the Dalits or Harijans from entering temples, streets, buses, etc. They are free to use all public services with respect and dignity. Also, no one can refuse from selling anything to the Dalit people.

The government also gives reservation to these castes. Reservation means that a certain percentage of places in government colleges and jobs are reserved for the people from lower classes. It, therefore, ensures that their oppression in the past does not affect the progress of their present and their future. The reservation also aims at providing them a fair chance of education which is beneficial for them along with their families and generations to come.

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Today’s Scenario of Untouchability

Today the view of untouchability is different from ancient India. People are becoming more aware and are adapting to rational thinking. In spite of the constitutional amendments; untouchability, and caste discrimination still prevail in society. The politicians use this to increase their vote bank and gain power in the government.

The Dalits living in the cities are less vulnerable to this practice of discrimination as compared to those living in rural areas. People living in rural areas prefer to stick to their traditional beliefs, practices and refuse to accept the changes made for the betterment of society.

All people are equal in the eyes of law. We shall not discriminate and dominate others on the basis of their caste. We should teach our children about the importance of sensibility, generosity, and equality with all people.  The Dalits face discrimination majorly because of their jobs such as cleaning public areas etc. Basically, we shall respect them the most as they keep our society clean and healthy. Therefore, the young generation should take charge and fight for its complete abolition.

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Essay on Untouchability in English for Students

Introduction.

India is considered to be the largest democratic country and this country is divided into different religions and castes. Untouchability is a very serious problem related to the Hindu society of India.

This has become such a problem for any country, which brings other difficulties and obstacles. Untouchability is like a termite, which is destroying our country from the inside.

Meaning of Untouchability

The meaning of this obstacle i.e. untouchability is – when we do not go near anyone because he is not fit to touch. It has been seen that in our society some members or people are not touched and when a person does not touch his touched or touched things and does not even come near them, then it is called untouchability.

No one wants to live in harmony with people, and no one lives in harmony with such people and no one wants to share their food with them. Those who employ such laborers and make them work for the lower castes are called untouchables.

In the olden times, only after seeing the work of any man from the kings, his religion was firmly kept. During that time every person used to choose his religion on his own. Those who were Brahmins used to do the work of sharing education or knowledge and those who were from the Kshatriya religion looked after the security of the country and society.

The difference with the Untouchables

The people who used to come from the lower caste of India are differentiated under NCDHR in many ways. No one shared his food with those who were considered untouchables, and no one eats food. Apart from this, no one wants to marry people of any different caste and religion.

In the villages which have tea stalls or shops, there are separate utensils for the low caste of untouchable people. People who are considered untouchables are not allowed to enter any temples.

Apart from this, the untouchables are also forbidden to walk on those roads on which people of upper caste keep coming and going and prevent such children from coming to school. Or put them in a separate place. Different types of utensils are used for these untouchables to sit and eat in hotels also.

Reasons for the existence of untouchability in today’s era

Needless to say, even in today’s times, people living in our society are differentiated on the basis of caste or birth.

Consequences of Untouchability

There are social, political, religious and culturally wrong consequences of untouchability which are quite prevalent all over the world.

Nowadays our country has made a lot of progress and progress, and even then the challenge of untouchability is present throughout the country.

That is why even today there are many such areas in the country, where such people have not been provided with any kind of amenities.

If we want to transform our country into a developed country, then we have to eradicate the problem of untouchability from our society. Because a country can develop only where all the people live together and do any work together without considering caste religion. Because discrimination on the basis of caste religion can become a big obstacle to the development of our country. That is why we should live with the spirit of equality, harmony and brotherhood with people of all caste religions. Along with this, we should encourage our children to do the same. So that this discrimination does not remain in our coming generation so that our country can develop rapidly.

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Essay on Untouchability

Students are often asked to write an essay on Untouchability in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on Untouchability

Understanding untouchability.

Untouchability is a form of discrimination that has been practiced for centuries, mainly in India. It is based on the caste system, where certain people are considered ‘untouchable’ due to their low social status.

Effects of Untouchability

The untouchables, or Dalits, face many hardships. They are often denied basic rights like education, employment, and even clean water. This leads to poverty and a low quality of life.

Combating Untouchability

Untouchability is illegal in India today, but it still exists. Education and awareness are key to ending this practice. Everyone deserves respect and equal opportunities, regardless of their caste.

Also check:

  • 10 Lines on Untouchability

250 Words Essay on Untouchability

Untouchability: a historical perspective.

Untouchability, a social evil deeply rooted in the caste system of India, is a form of discrimination that segregates individuals based on their birth status. This age-old practice, originating from the Vedic period, has been a subject of intense scrutiny and criticism due to its violation of fundamental human rights.

The Social Implications of Untouchability

The practice of untouchability is not merely a form of discrimination but a systemic violation of equality and dignity. It perpetuates a cycle of poverty and social disadvantage, depriving the so-called ‘untouchables’ of their basic rights to education, employment, and social mobility.

Legislative Measures Against Untouchability

Recognizing the inhumanity of untouchability, the Indian Constitution, under Article 17, abolished it, declaring it a punishable offense. The Protection of Civil Rights Act, 1955, and the Scheduled Castes and Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, 1989, further reinforce legal provisions against such discrimination.

The Role of Education and Awareness

While legal measures are crucial, eradication of untouchability requires a shift in societal mindset. Education plays a pivotal role in this regard, fostering empathy, understanding, and respect for all, irrespective of their caste or social status.

Untouchability, a manifestation of deep-seated prejudice and inequality, continues to be a pressing issue. Despite constitutional provisions, its eradication requires collective societal effort. Education, awareness, and a commitment to uphold human dignity are essential to obliterate this social stigma.

500 Words Essay on Untouchability

Introduction.

Untouchability is a deeply entrenched social evil that has pervaded societies across the world, with a particularly pronounced presence in the Indian subcontinent. It is a form of discrimination that segregates a section of society, deeming them ‘untouchable’ based on their birth into a specific caste or social group. This essay explores the historical origins, the contemporary implications, and potential solutions to this grave social issue.

Historical Context

Untouchability has its roots in the ancient caste system of India, where society was divided into four main castes or ‘Varnas’ – Brahmins, Kshatriyas, Vaishyas, and Shudras. The Shudras, often associated with menial labor, were considered ‘untouchable’ by the upper castes. This system was initially fluid, based on one’s profession, but over time, it became hereditary, and the lower castes were subjected to severe social ostracism and economic deprivation.

Implications of Untouchability

Untouchability perpetuates a cycle of poverty and marginalization. It restricts access to resources, opportunities, and basic human rights, thereby limiting the social and economic mobility of the ‘untouchable’ castes. This leads to their continued marginalization and poverty, creating a vicious cycle that is difficult to break.

Untouchability also has severe psychological implications. The stigmatization and humiliation faced by the ‘untouchables’ often result in low self-esteem, a sense of inferiority, and a lack of self-worth. This can lead to mental health issues and a diminished sense of identity.

Legal Measures and their Effectiveness

In an attempt to eradicate untouchability, legal measures have been implemented in various countries. In India, for instance, the constitution prohibits untouchability and provides for affirmative action to uplift the marginalized castes. However, despite these measures, untouchability persists, indicating that legal measures alone are insufficient.

The Role of Education

Education plays a critical role in combating untouchability. It can help break the cycle of poverty and marginalization by providing the ‘untouchables’ with skills and knowledge to improve their economic status. Moreover, education can foster social awareness and empathy, challenging deep-seated prejudices and promoting social harmony.

Untouchability is a complex issue that requires a multifaceted approach. Legal measures, while necessary, need to be complemented by social initiatives that challenge discriminatory attitudes and practices. Education, both formal and informal, can play a crucial role in this regard. It is imperative that societies worldwide work towards eradicating this social evil, ensuring dignity, equality, and justice for all.

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untouchability

Definition of untouchability

Examples of untouchability in a sentence.

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'untouchability.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

1919, in the meaning defined above

Dictionary Entries Near untouchability

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Cite this Entry

“Untouchability.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/untouchability. Accessed 3 Jan. 2024.

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Essay on Untouchability for Children and Students

Table of Contents

Untouchability in its most basic sense is the practice of alienating a particular group of people based on their caste and other social customs. It is one of the many outcomes of the caste system in India. Untouchability is present in India since centuries. It is considered to be one of the most heinous social crimes.

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Long and Short Essay on Untouchability in English

Here are essays on untouchability of varying lengths to help you with the topic in your exam. You can select any untouchability essay as per your need:

Untouchability Essay 1 (200 Words)

The practice of untouchability can be defined as the discrimination of certain groups of people and their inhuman treatment based on their castes and social groups.

Untouchability is a practice so old that it is embedded tightly onto roots of many people in India. People divided in the name of such social practices refuse to see the bigger picture and refrain from treating everyone as equals. It is the naïve thought processes and opinions of certain people that have led to the way in which people from the so called “Lower caste” are treated.

Different words are used across the world to address these people who are the victims of the practice of untouchability such Dalits in Asia and Cagots in Europe. Various brave people with vision have fought against this absurd practice. Some of them include Vinoba Bhave, B.R. Ambedkar and Mahatma Gandhi. These people with the help of their supporters chose to fight against the odds and the unfair treatment. This was one of the many evils of the society against which the leaders of independent India were fighting. Other social evils that have existed in India include sati practice, polygamy, child marriage and illiteracy to name a few. While some of these practices are still prevalent in our society others have been brought to end with a lot of effort.

Untouchability Essay 2 (300 words)

Introduction

Untouchability is the practice in which certain groups of people are discriminated and alienated based on their caste and culture and are subjected to inhumane treatment. This practice has prevailed since a long time in our society and is the major outcome of caste system.

Who are the untouchables?

In India, the Dalits are usually victims of this system. People in our country are bifurcated based on their caste – The Brahmans, the Kshtriyas, the Vaishyas and the Shudras. The Shudras’s are the victims of untouchability. One of the reasons for outcasting them is that they indulge in labor and cleaning work. In addition to this, people indulging in specific jobs, tribal people and ones suffering from certain infections and diseases are considered as untouchables. They are not considered as an essential part of the society rather they were loathed and denied their share of respect and dignity.

The Dalits regularly indulge themselves in jobs such as scavenging, cleaning public and residential places, tackling dead cattle corpses etc. This clearly states that they were an important part of the society as they worked to keep it clean and healthy for everyone. Rather the jobs they did were one of the prime reasons of the inhuman treatment they received. They were denied basic rights such as using public places, entering temples, using schools, wells, etc.

In spite of the extreme struggles of the leaders of independent India to abolish untouchability and the caste system, it still prevails in modern India in different forms than those in the past. The formulation of laws against its practice has to some extent reduced the frequency and intensity of such discrimination and treatment. Since Independence, the government has started many campaigns for the people of backward class such as providing free education, reservation in colleges and government jobs etc. This is a hope for all the liberals and Dalits out there and a promise for a new, better and tolerant India.

Untouchability Essay 3 (400 words)

Untouchability can be well defined as the practice of discriminating various individuals and groups based on their cast and the jobs they indulge in. The concept of untouchability is a relatively old one and has been in practice since a long time. It works on the Indian caste system hierarchy which includes Brahmans, Kshtriyas, Vaishya and Shudras. The Shudras have usually been subjected to the inhuman treatment because they are believed to belong to the lower caste. They’ve been through various kinds of discrimination at almost all places be it offices, homes, schools, temples and all other public places.

Discrimination against the Dalits:-

The different forms of discrimination against the Dalits in India are as follows:

  • They are not allowed to use public services such as buses, wells, etc.
  • They are not allowed to marry anyone from the upper castes.
  • They are not allowed to enter temples and other public places such as hospitals and schools.
  • They need to use separate utensils for eating and are not allowed to sit near the upper caste people.
  • Dalit children are not allowed to go to common school instead they go to special schools for people of their caste.
  • They are not allowed to fight for their rights. If they refuse to do their jobs and act according to the elite classes they have to face certain adversities by the dominant classes.
  • Many employers sometimes refuse to provide jobs to the people of scheduled castes.

These are the various forms of discrimination against the lower caste people. These need to be addressed and appropriate action should to taken to abolish this practice by the government and make it a punishable offense.

Hence, after decades of regaining independence, India is still not completely free from these social evils. The Dalits have been discriminated majorly because of the jobs they indulge in such as scavenging, cleaning public areas etc. Ironically, they should be the ones given utmost respect as they keep our society clean and healthy by getting filth on their own hands. The leaders of independent India such as Mahatma Gandhi and B.R Ambedkar fought to give the Dalit community their basic rights and abolish the system of untouchability. In spite of their efforts, a part of the society still believes in practicing untouchability. The young generation should take charge and fight for its complete abolition and justify the struggles of the past leaders.

Untouchability Essay 4 (500 words)

The concept of untouchability is defined as the practice of alienating people from lower castes and those indulging in specific jobs. The ‘untouchables’ are considered impure and are despised by the so called ‘Upper caste’ people. This is a practice which has prevailed in our society for thousands of years. Many people have come forward and fought for their rights and they even succeeded to some extent.

History of Untouchability in India

The term Dalit for the untouchables is derived from the Sanskrit word dal meaning broken or downtrodden. Some people believe that the system of untouchability only prevails in India but it is also prevalent in countries such as Japan, Tibet and Korea. The classification of castes has been derived from our Vedic texts which bifurcate people into four major groups:

  • The Brahmnas – Priests and elite people
  • The Kshtriyas – Warriors
  • The Vaishyas – Small Businessmen and Merchants
  • The Shudras –Sanitary workers

These bifurcations of ancient India were made based on caste and profession of the people. Though in today’s times, these people have switched jobs, still a large chunk of population continues the practice of untouchability and despises the lower caste people.

The caste system was originated in various ways. At some places, certain influential groups seized power and declared themselves Brahmans (regarded as the purest caste) in order to suppress the lower castes whereas in most places people of specific groups were considered untouchables from birth.

Today’s Scenario of Untouchability

Today the scenario of untouchability is different from that of ancient India. People are becoming more educated and are adapting to rational thinking. At the time of independence, several movements in favor of abolishment were initiated and as a result, amendments were made in the constitution and the governmental system to accommodate the interests and rights of the oppressed people.

In spite of the constitutional amendments, untouchability and discrimination based on caste still prevails. Often the politicians use this to enhance their vote bank and gain power in the government. The Dalits living in the cities are less vulnerable to this practice of discrimination in today’s era as compared to those living in relatively remote and under developed areas. Generally, people living in villages and other rural areas tend to stick to their traditional beliefs and refuse to accept the changes and improvements made in the society.

What started upon the occupation of a person has become subject to heredity. In a nutshell, this implies that even if a person does not indulge in menial jobs that could earn him the tag of lower caste however if his ancestors were involved in such tasks he would automatically become Untouchable or Dalit.

This is an extremely ancient practice which has its roots firmly entwined to our society and its people. Though difficult, but it is not impossible to change people’s mind and make them see people from all classes as equal and give everyone a fair treatment. This will ensure peace and harmony among the residents of a society and ensure contentment to all.

Untouchability Essay 5 (600 words)

Untouchability is an age old practice of discrimination of people from the lower hierarchy of castes. It is one of the many negative outcomes of the caste system. It involves mistreating people from oppressed classes based on their status and jobs.

Struggles for the Abolishment of Untouchability

Following years of exercising dominance over the oppressed class or more popularly known ‘Dalits’, the practice of untouchability still has its marks in many societies around us. Even educated people refuse to give up that practice. They view it as the benchmark of their love for purity and are overcome by a sense of superiority over the oppressed classes or the well known Dalit people.

Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar and Mahatma Gandhi were among the prominent leaders who fought tirelessly for the abolition of the practice of untouchability. B.R. Ambedkar was involved in Indian politics and also helped draft the constitution of India alongside Mahatma Gandhi. He was a man with highly liberal ideas and the interest of the oppressed classes on his mind.

These people along with vision, determination and perseverance achieved their goals and gave a rightful chance to the Dalits to prove themselves and enhance the concept of equality, harmony and brotherhood in the society.

The Harijan Movement

The term ‘Harijan’ was coined by Mahatma Gandhi himself which meant ‘children of god’. This term was widely used to refer to the people of the oppressed classes or the Dalits. This was an agitated movement aimed at fighting the discrimination against certain castes in the society. This movement was officially started in 1933. It was a 9 month long movement aimed at gaining social, economic and political rights for the people of lower classes. The initiation of this movement also led to several kinds of violent acts by many dishonest groups.

Amendments in the Constitution

After several movement and struggles to eradicate the practice of untouchability, amendments were made in the constitution to accommodate the interests of the oppressed classes. Article 17 of the Indian constitution abolishes untouchability and also declared it as a punishable act. No one can restrict the Dalits or Harijans from entering temples, streets, buses etc. They are free to use all the public services with respect and dignity. In addition to these, no one can refuse from selling anything to the Dalit people.

Along with the amendments in the constitution for the abolition of untouchability, the government included the concept of reservation which means that certain percentage of places in government colleges and jobs were reserved for the people from classes such as Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribes and other backward class. This was done to ensure that their oppression in the past does not hinder the progress of their present and their future and it was also aimed at providing them a fair chance of education and of their upliftment along with their families and generations to come.

All people should be equal in the eyes of law and no one should be discriminated and dominated based on things as race, color, caste, physical features etc. Children should be taught about the importance of various jobs in the society. Seeds of sensibility, generosity and equality should be sown into their tender minds as these are the ones who should have the best interest of the nation on their minds because of the fact that they will someday contribute to the betterment of the society and hold powerful position in the society itself and in governmental bodies. Each hurdle in the way of a better and peaceful nation should be tackled with determination and goodwill just as some of our prominent leaders have done in the past. Those leaders should be idolized by the youth of the country.

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Untouchability Essay

Untouchability in its most basic sense is the practice of alienating a particular group of people based on their caste and other social customs. It is one of the many outcomes of the caste system in India. Untouchability is present in India since centuries. It is considered to be one of the most heinous social crimes.

Long and Short Essay on Untouchability in English

Here are essays on untouchability of varying lengths to help you with the topic in your exam. You can select any untouchability essay as per your need:

Untouchability Essay 1 (200 Words)

The practice of untouchability can be defined as the discrimination of certain groups of people and their inhuman treatment based on their castes and social groups.

Untouchability is a practice so old that it is embedded tightly onto roots of many people in India. People divided in the name of such social practices refuse to see the bigger picture and refrain from treating everyone as equals. It is the naïve thought processes and opinions of certain people that have led to the way in which people from the so called “Lower caste” are treated.

Different words are used across the world to address these people who are the victims of the practice of untouchability such Dalits in Asia and Cagots in Europe. Various brave people with vision have fought against this absurd practice. Some of them include Vinoba Bhave, B.R. Ambedkar and Mahatma Gandhi. These people with the help of their supporters chose to fight against the odds and the unfair treatment. This was one of the many evils of the society against which the leaders of independent India were fighting. Other social evils that have existed in India include sati practice, polygamy, child marriage and illiteracy to name a few. While some of these practices are still prevalent in our society others have been brought to end with a lot of effort.

Untouchability Essay 2 (300 words)

Introduction

Untouchability is the practice in which certain groups of people are discriminated and alienated based on their caste and culture and are subjected to inhumane treatment. This practice has prevailed since a long time in our society and is the major outcome of caste system.

Who are the untouchables?

In India, the Dalits are usually victims of this system. People in our country are bifurcated based on their caste – The Brahmans, the Kshtriyas, the Vaishyas and the Shudras. The Shudras’s are the victims of untouchability. One of the reasons for outcasting them is that they indulge in labor and cleaning work. In addition to this, people indulging in specific jobs, tribal people and ones suffering from certain infections and diseases are considered as untouchables. They are not considered as an essential part of the society rather they were loathed and denied their share of respect and dignity.

The Dalits regularly indulge themselves in jobs such as scavenging, cleaning public and residential places, tackling dead cattle corpses etc. This clearly states that they were an important part of the society as they worked to keep it clean and healthy for everyone. Rather the jobs they did were one of the prime reasons of the inhuman treatment they received. They were denied basic rights such as using public places, entering temples, using schools, wells, etc.

In spite of the extreme struggles of the leaders of independent India to abolish untouchability and the caste system, it still prevails in modern India in different forms than those in the past. The formulation of laws against its practice has to some extent reduced the frequency and intensity of such discrimination and treatment. Since Independence, the government has started many campaigns for the people of backward class such as providing free education, reservation in colleges and government jobs etc. This is a hope for all the liberals and Dalits out there and a promise for a new, better and tolerant India.

Untouchability Essay 3 (400 words)

Untouchability can be well defined as the practice of discriminating various individuals and groups based on their cast and the jobs they indulge in. The concept of untouchability is a relatively old one and has been in practice since a long time. It works on the Indian caste system hierarchy which includes Brahmans, Kshtriyas, Vaishya and Shudras. The Shudras have usually been subjected to the inhuman treatment because they are believed to belong to the lower caste. They’ve been through various kinds of discrimination at almost all places be it offices, homes, schools, temples and all other public places.

Discrimination against the Dalits:-

The different forms of discrimination against the Dalits in India are as follows:

  • They are not allowed to use public services such as buses, wells, etc.
  • They are not allowed to marry anyone from the upper castes.
  • They are not allowed to enter temples and other public places such as hospitals and schools.
  • They need to use separate utensils for eating and are not allowed to sit near the upper caste people.
  • Dalit children are not allowed to go to common school instead they go to special schools for people of their caste.
  • They are not allowed to fight for their rights. If they refuse to do their jobs and act according to the elite classes they have to face certain adversities by the dominant classes.
  • Many employers sometimes refuse to provide jobs to the people of scheduled castes.

These are the various forms of discrimination against the lower caste people. These need to be addressed and appropriate action should to taken to abolish this practice by the government and make it a punishable offense.

Hence, after decades of regaining independence, India is still not completely free from these social evils. The Dalits have been discriminated majorly because of the jobs they indulge in such as scavenging, cleaning public areas etc. Ironically, they should be the ones given utmost respect as they keep our society clean and healthy by getting filth on their own hands. The leaders of independent India such as Mahatma Gandhi and B.R Ambedkar fought to give the Dalit community their basic rights and abolish the system of untouchability. In spite of their efforts, a part of the society still believes in practicing untouchability. The young generation should take charge and fight for its complete abolition and justify the struggles of the past leaders.

Untouchability Essay 4 (500 words)

The concept of untouchability is defined as the practice of alienating people from lower castes and those indulging in specific jobs. The ‘untouchables’ are considered impure and are despised by the so called ‘Upper caste’ people. This is a practice which has prevailed in our society for thousands of years. Many people have come forward and fought for their rights and they even succeeded to some extent.

History of Untouchability in India

The term Dalit for the untouchables is derived from the Sanskrit word dal meaning broken or downtrodden. Some people believe that the system of untouchability only prevails in India but it is also prevalent in countries such as Japan, Tibet and Korea. The classification of castes has been derived from our Vedic texts which bifurcate people into four major groups:

  • The Brahmnas – Priests and elite people
  • The Kshtriyas – Warriors
  • The Vaishyas – Small Businessmen and Merchants
  • The Shudras –Sanitary workers

These bifurcations of ancient India were made based on caste and profession of the people. Though in today’s times, these people have switched jobs, still a large chunk of population continues the practice of untouchability and despises the lower caste people.

The caste system was originated in various ways. At some places, certain influential groups seized power and declared themselves Brahmans (regarded as the purest caste) in order to suppress the lower castes whereas in most places people of specific groups were considered untouchables from birth.

Today’s Scenario of Untouchability

Today the scenario of untouchability is different from that of ancient India. People are becoming more educated and are adapting to rational thinking. At the time of independence, several movements in favor of abolishment were initiated and as a result, amendments were made in the constitution and the governmental system to accommodate the interests and rights of the oppressed people.

In spite of the constitutional amendments, untouchability and discrimination based on caste still prevails. Often the politicians use this to enhance their vote bank and gain power in the government. The Dalits living in the cities are less vulnerable to this practice of discrimination in today’s era as compared to those living in relatively remote and under developed areas. Generally, people living in villages and other rural areas tend to stick to their traditional beliefs and refuse to accept the changes and improvements made in the society.

What started upon the occupation of a person has become subject to heredity. In a nutshell, this implies that even if a person does not indulge in menial jobs that could earn him the tag of lower caste however if his ancestors were involved in such tasks he would automatically become Untouchable or Dalit.

This is an extremely ancient practice which has its roots firmly entwined to our society and its people. Though difficult, but it is not impossible to change people’s mind and make them see people from all classes as equal and give everyone a fair treatment. This will ensure peace and harmony among the residents of a society and ensure contentment to all.

Untouchability Essay 5 (600 words)

Untouchability is an age old practice of discrimination of people from the lower hierarchy of castes. It is one of the many negative outcomes of the caste system. It involves mistreating people from oppressed classes based on their status and jobs.

Struggles for the Abolishment of Untouchability

Following years of exercising dominance over the oppressed class or more popularly known ‘Dalits’, the practice of untouchability still has its marks in many societies around us. Even educated people refuse to give up that practice. They view it as the benchmark of their love for purity and are overcome by a sense of superiority over the oppressed classes or the well known Dalit people.

Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar and Mahatma Gandhi were among the prominent leaders who fought tirelessly for the abolition of the practice of untouchability. B.R. Ambedkar was involved in Indian politics and also helped draft the constitution of India alongside Mahatma Gandhi. He was a man with highly liberal ideas and the interest of the oppressed classes on his mind.

These people along with vision, determination and perseverance achieved their goals and gave a rightful chance to the Dalits to prove themselves and enhance the concept of equality, harmony and brotherhood in the society.

The Harijan Movement

The term ‘Harijan’ was coined by Mahatma Gandhi himself which meant ‘children of god’. This term was widely used to refer to the people of the oppressed classes or the Dalits. This was an agitated movement aimed at fighting the discrimination against certain castes in the society. This movement was officially started in 1933. It was a 9 month long movement aimed at gaining social, economic and political rights for the people of lower classes. The initiation of this movement also led to several kinds of violent acts by many dishonest groups.

Amendments in the Constitution

After several movement and struggles to eradicate the practice of untouchability, amendments were made in the constitution to accommodate the interests of the oppressed classes. Article 17 of the Indian constitution abolishes untouchability and also declared it as a punishable act. No one can restrict the Dalits or Harijans from entering temples, streets, buses etc. They are free to use all the public services with respect and dignity. In addition to these, no one can refuse from selling anything to the Dalit people.

Along with the amendments in the constitution for the abolition of untouchability, the government included the concept of reservation which means that certain percentage of places in government colleges and jobs were reserved for the people from classes such as Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribes and other backward class. This was done to ensure that their oppression in the past does not hinder the progress of their present and their future and it was also aimed at providing them a fair chance of education and of their upliftment along with their families and generations to come.

All people should be equal in the eyes of law and no one should be discriminated and dominated based on things as race, color, caste, physical features etc. Children should be taught about the importance of various jobs in the society. Seeds of sensibility, generosity and equality should be sown into their tender minds as these are the ones who should have the best interest of the nation on their minds because of the fact that they will someday contribute to the betterment of the society and hold powerful position in the society itself and in governmental bodies. Each hurdle in the way of a better and peaceful nation should be tackled with determination and goodwill just as some of our prominent leaders have done in the past. Those leaders should be idolized by the youth of the country.

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English – Untouchability Essay for Students and Children

Untouchability Essay : Here GkSection is published an important essay on Untouchability in English language. The Untouchability Essay is an useful for those students who are currently studying in school or colleges. With the help of Untouchability essay you can write or give fluently speech about Untouchability in your school/college’s exam. Students which is currently studying in Class 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 or graduate can preparation here for Untouchability Essay in English with lots of information about the Untouchability.

Long and Short Essay on Untouchability for School/College’s Students

Untouchability is the practice of alienating a particular group of people based on their caste and other social status. It is one of the many evil outcomes directly arising out of the caste system in India. It has been present in India for centuries and it is considered to be one of the most heinous social evils.

Untouchability is a practice so ancient that it is already embedded tightly onto the roots of many people in India. People divided in the name of such petty social practices are too blind to see the bigger picture and refrain from treating everyone as equals. It is the thought processes and opinions of certain immature people that have led to the way in which the low caste people are treated.

Different terms are used across the world to address these people who are the victims of the evil practice of untouchability such ‘Cagots’ in Europe and ‘Dalits’ in Asia. Various brave people with farsighted vision have strenuously fought against this absurd unethical practice. Even after decades of independence, India is still not totally free from this social evil. Some of those great people are Vinoba Bhave, B.R. Ambedkar, and Mahatma Gandhi. ‘Harijan’ which means ‘children of God’ was the term coined by Mahatma Gandhi himself. This was the term widely used to refer to the people of the oppressed classes or the Dalits. Despite their efforts, some parts of the society still believe in practicing untouchability. The young generation should take care to fight for its complete abolition and justify the struggles of the past leaders.

Untouchability was one of the many evils of the society against which our leaders of independent India kept fighting on without much positive result. All people should be treated equally in the eyes of law and no one should be discriminated under any circumstances based on race, colour, caste, etc. This lesson on equality should be taught to children at home and in schools. They should be taught about the importance and dignity of various jobs in the society. Seeds of sensibility, generosity and equality should be sown into them when their minds are still tender. Anything that is standing on the way to social development should be done away with. The basic respect for another human being should be inculcated to all from childhood. Above all, the first step toward learning to respect others is by respecting oneself.

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Essay on untouchability.

untouchability essay meaning in english

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Untouchability is a very old concept. The problem of untouchability is a serious social malady in the Indian society. The notion of pollution, defilement and contamination has resulted in the worst evil of Hindu society termed as untouchability. Of course, the oppression and exploitation of the backward sections has always been a social phenomenon in all civilizations, except, perhaps, the communistic.

In ancient Egypt and Babylonia there were instances of slavery and it is believed that the great pyramids were built by the slave labour. In Rome, there were the plebeians. In Sparta, there were Helots and the Perioeci. But, the untouchables in India who remained in the state of total suppression and abject destitution, prior to the operation of the present Constitution, are unparalled, perhaps, in human history.

Ghurye believed that, prior to 800 B.C., the idea of ceremonial purity almost existed full-fledged and was operative in relation to not only the despised and degraded ‘chandals’ but also to the sudras who constituted the fourth order of Hindu society. But B.R. Ambedkar is of the opinion that while the impure as a class came into existence at the time of the Dharma sutras, the untouchables came into being much later than 400 A.D. He, however, said that the untouchables do not belong to a race different from the Aryan and the Dravidian. The Brahmins and the untouchables belong to the same race.

The Government of India prepared a list of 429 untouchable castes consisting of a population over 5 crores in 1935, for providing special facilities to them. In the list of castes, ‘Chandala’ figures in Tamil Nadu, Orissa and Rajasthan, ‘Holeya’ and ‘Madiga’ in Karnataka; ‘Namasudra’ in Assam and West Bengal; ‘Dom’ in Bihar, Orissa, Tamil Nadu, U.P and Bengal.

The ‘chamar’ or the leather worker is also found in many parts in India. He is also known as ‘mochi’. Theoretically, untouchables are not covered within the “chaturvarna” or four- fold division of society. They fall outside the Hindu social order and are called the ‘panchamas’. But from the practical point of view, the fourth order of Hindu society, the ‘sudras’, were placed at the bottom in caste hierarchy.

As such they are considered as untouchables by the people of other castes. Historically, Sudras have been subjected to extreme forms of exploitation degradation and inhuman treatment by the upper sections of society. The practice of untouchability appears to be the creation of the ‘dwijas’ so as to keep them in misery and poverty and to give them a slavish treatment. Gandhi, the father of the nation, says “untouchability is the hateful expression of caste system and it is a crime against God and man.” He lovingly called the untouchables as ‘Harijans’, the people of God.

The untouchables were called by different names in different times. In Vedic period, they were known as ‘chandala’. In Medieval times, they were known as ‘Achhuta’. In British period they were known as “Exterior Caste” or “Depressed Castes”. In recent times, they are known as the “Scheduled Castes”, the name given by the Indian Constitution for their upliftment.

Even though, the untouchables were not theoretically considered as a part of Varna organization, nevertheless, they are closely associated with Hindu social life. Their presence was very much essential for the smooth functioning of Hindu society because it was the untouchable who performed various polluting activities like scavenging, basket making, removal of dead cattle etc.

It is extremely difficult to arrive at a clear-cut definition of untouchability. Untouchable refers to the despised and degraded section of the Hindu population. Untouchables are those who are suffering from certain disabilities imposed on them by the superior castes, through the practice of untouchability. According to Untouchability Offences Act 1955, “It is an offence to prevent any person on the ground of untouchability:

(i) From entering any place of public worship which is open to other persons, professing the same religion,

(ii) From worshipping or offering prayers or performing any religious service in any place of public worship or bathing in or using the waters of any sacred tank, well, spring or water-course in the same manner as is permissible to other persons professing the same religion; and

(iii) From access to or use of a shop, hotel, public restaurant or place of public entertainment or public conveyance or hospital, dispensary or educational institution or charitable trust. So, it may be said that suffering from all kinds of disabilities is the sign of untouchability.

Manu Smritis ordain that the people who practise the lowest kind of occupation such as scavenging, basket making, removal of dead cattle, etc. are called as untouchables. Dr. D.N. Majumdar has said, “The untouchable castes are those who suffer from various social and political disabilities many of which are traditionally prescribed and socially enforced by higher castes.” According to G.S. Ghurye “Ideas of purity whether occupational or ceremonial, which are found to have been a factor in the genesis of caste are the very source of the idea and practice of untouchability.” In brief, untouchables are those castes which are subject to some disabilities in every walk of life, social, religious, economic and political.

Their position was not one of slavery, but worse than that. K.M. Pannikar described it as the system of communal slave-holding contrasted with individual owning slaves. No social or personal consideration was there to relax the rigors of the evil system. The untouchables lived within their own system. Thus they formed a parallel society to Hindu social system. They had the lowest ritual position in the society. They also had the lowest socio-economic position in society. These exterior castes were a depressed community who were subjected to all kinds of social and civic discriminations.

The concept of high caste ceremonial purity led to restrict certain occupations to these depressed communities. They took to menial jobs, cleaning of villages, removal of dead animals, tanning and leather work and so on. They hardly enjoyed any privileges, rather got maltreatment.

The nature, content and incidence of maltreatment varied in time and space. But some common features of this barbaric and slavish treatment were evident in their residential segregation, denial of entry into temples, shrines or other places of worship, prohibition against learning the Vedas, restrictions on the use of public facilities, such as wells, schools, roads, courts and so on, denial of services as provided by barbars, washer man, tailors, shopkeepers etc. restrictions on style of life, dress and ornaments, use of separate utensils; exhibition of slavish respect towards higher castes ; and subjugation to unpaid labour and so on.

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Essay on Untouchability for Students and Children | PDF Download

untouchability essay meaning in english

What is Untouchability?. Untouchability means making no physical contact with other groups, castes, religions. Untouchability is practiced in the history of India for a long period in their daily routine. It was practiced highly in the Hindu religion by the upper caste people in the earlier times of India. As similar to the above points the below essay on Untouchability is included with all the major key points. The below essay is on Untouchability a social evil, how it will affect society. In the further below in the article quotes on Untouchability were included.

Short Essay on Untouchability

Untouchability is one of the discrimination practices followed by the higher caste people in the olden days of the world. Most people think that untouchability had followed in India only, but it’s truly false it had followed in major parts of the world. Untouchability was followed in countries like Japan, Korea, Tibet people on the other lower caste people of those counties. Untouchability is the discrimination of other people based on caste, religion, work, color, and many other religions. It is still in the scenario in India with some Hindu religion with their women when they are in menstrual periods, the women were not allowed to enter the house and they should stay separately in those days, they should not touch anything, should not enter into the kitchen, should not go to temples, etc. This type of discrimination is strictly followed by the Brahim community even in the modern days.

In the olden days, the people of India were divided into four types, the last section of the people are called Dalits. The duty of the Dalits is sanitary work which means cleaning, manufacturing pots, chappals. These people had discriminated with their work and upper caste people will not touch these people. The generation of the Dalits is to work the same as their fathers and these cannot go to schools and they will not have many basic needs. This way the untouchability is processed in the past of India. As the days are passing the people got enlightened by positive thinkers, freedom fighters, and broad-minded people. Many people fought against untouchability and finally broke the untouchability between the people. At present, there are no untouchability scenarios in the name of caste, religion, work, etc. All the people are working together for the betterment and improvement of the country.

Long Essay on Untouchability

Untouchability is a practice followed by some religions and caste as a tradition of not touching other caste or religious people. Untouchability is one of the criticisms on lower or under caste people by the higher caste or powered people. This was followed as a tradition followed by grandparents as it was a rule according to history. This was discrimination towards people and suppressing their feelings.

This Untouchability is followed before independence in India and very few years after the independence. The world thought that untouchability is only followed by India and it started from the country. But it was not correct, many countries followed untouchability in their past. People of burakumin in Japan, Baekjeong of Korea, Ragyabpa of Tibet, Romani people, Cagotin Europe, Al Akhdam in Yemen have followed the untouchability. In the Past, the Term Untouchability is deemed Polluting. The people think that the lower caste works as fishermen, sweepers, washermen, etc. By touching these working people the higher people will be polluted due to they follow high cleanliness.

As the days passed the untouchability strength decreased and people started working together. Even in the middle times, some people have not touched the people who eat raw flesh and animals. In the past of India, the people were divided into 4 categories or castes according to Vedas. The 4 groups are Brahmins, Vysyas, Kshatriyas, Sudras. Brahmins are treated as higher caste and worked as saints, and the lowest caste is Sudras who worked as sanitary people, fishermen, butchers, making chappals, potters, etc.

The Sudras also called Dalits and they were treated very badly and crushed their freedom and feelings. In those days the untouchability is followed at a higher rate, by this, some group people are not allowed to move into society. The people of some groups have their shops to sell and are allowed for their group people only. The lower groups are prohibited to enter temples, upper-caste people’s homes, and these groups were prohibited from public access. The children of Dalits were not allowed to school and those children should work as their parents. In this way, discrimination is observed due to untouchability.

All these discriminations were observed by some freedom fighters and positive thinkers but only a few people came forward to fight against it. They started motivating people that everyone is equal on earth and everyone had freedom in society. The best example of untouchability is the childhood of B R Ambedkar, he had discriminated against by the people as he was from a lower caste family. As a result, he had written the constitution for the people of India. In the modern days after the constitution was written the government started Untouchability awareness and consider it as a crime.

The government of India bought the untouchability acts and made it an untouchability punishable offense. Untouchability Act 1955 is one of the acts, which is considered a crime. In the constitution of India, this was included in one of the articles of the Indian constitution. The government got awareness in the people and motivated the people to remove the untouchability. At present, the dream of many people got succeeded and the untouchability has been abolished and all the people came together and work for the development of the country. Every person had their human rights in the present society.

Quotes on Untouchability

  • If untouchability lives, humanity must die.
  • It is a crime and a sin to regard a person as untouchable because he is born in a particular community.
  • Hinduism dies if untouchability lives, and untouchability has to die if Hinduism is to live.
  • A bitter thing cannot be made sweet. The taste of anything can be changed. But poison cannot be changed into nectar
  • The diversity there certainly is in the world, but it means neither inequality nor untouchability.
  • Untouchability, I hold, is a sin, if Bhagavadgita is one of our Divine Books.
  • I regard untouchability as such a grave sin as to warrant divine chastisement.
  • Men like me feel that untouchability is no integral part of Hinduism, it is an excrescence.
  • They learned to hate her unknowability, her untouchability, the collage of her.
  • Untouchability is an error of long-standing.

Conclusion: We hope that the above essays on Untouchability will help you at the needed times. Essays on untouchability a social evil in society and how people were treated with untouchability had been covered in it.

Dear Students and Children, you can download the Untouchability Essay in the Hand Written Format by Clicking the Below Click Here Link.

English Summary

1 Minute Speech on Untouchability In English

A very good morning to one and all present here. Today, I will be giving a short speech on the topic of ‘Untouchability’.

Wikipedia defines the term as follows: “Untouchability is a form of a social institution that legitimises and enforces practices that are discriminatory, humiliating, exclusionary and exploitative against people belonging to certain social groups.”

Untouchability is a social evil. It is a crime to consider it a sin to touch a fellow human on whatever basis that might be!

Mahatma Gandhi, an icon in the struggle against untouchability has once said, “Our struggle does not end so long as there is a single human being considered untouchable on account of his birth.” Even today thus, the struggle has not ended.

We proudly proclaim that all humans are equal when in many places in India, tea shops still have separate glasses for lower-caste people! Let us vow to put an end to the evils of untouchability and end this long struggle!

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22 Untouchability: Mulk Raj Anand: Untouchables

Ananya Bhattacharjee

Introducing the Author

Mulk Raj Anand was one of the most prolific writers of the period who is best known as a social realist and a humanist. He was born in Peshawar in 1905 and received his early education in Khalsa College Amritsar. Later he went to England and got admitted to University College London as an undergraduate. He then attended Cambridge University and got his Ph.D. degree in 1929. There he had close acquaintance with the Bloomsbury Group and even spent some of his time in Geneva. Anand lived his life partly in London and India. During the period of India’s Independence movement he showed his concern by writing propaganda on behalf of the Indian cause. He also worked as a journalist and supported freedom elsewhere in the world especially Spain during the Spanish Civil War. At the time of World War II he was a scriptwriter for the BBC in London and became one of George Orwell’s good friends. In 1946, Anand came back to India and carried on his literary career as a writer. Most of his novels deal with the representation of the lives of the downtrodden people and used literature as a medium to highlight the exploitation of the impoverished section of the Indian conservative society.

Mulk Raj Anand’s career as a writer was shaped much by his family tragedy especially the strictures of caste system that prevailed in the society. His first essay was written under the influence of the incident of his aunt’s suicide following her excommunication by her family as she had shared meal with a Muslim lady. His first novel Untouchable published in 1935 was an indictment on the orthodox Indian society which discriminated people belonging to the lower strata. His vision of a humanist and a reformist is seen in this novel which gave him immense popularity. His other humanistic novels are Coolie (1936), Two Leaves And A Bud (1937), The Village (1939), Across the Black Waters (1941), The Sword and the Sickle (1942) and The Big Heart in 1945. Anand has also written seven collections of short stories – The Child and other Stories (1934), The Barber’s Trade Union and other Stories (1944), The Tractor and the Corn Goddess and other Stories (1947), Reflections on the Golden Bed and other Stories (1953), The Power of Darkness and other stories (1959), Lajwanti and other stories (1966) and Between Tears and Laughter (1973). His other works include Indian fairy Tales (1961), The Old woman and the Cow (1960). It was followed by The Road (1963) and The Death of Hero (1964). Seven Summers, Morning Face, The Confession of A Lover and The Bubble are his autobiographical novels. He was honoured with the Sahitya Akademi Award for Morning Face (1968).

Mulk Raj Anand was the founder of a literary magazine named Marg and also was a member of the International Progress Organisation. He had delivered a series of lectures on prominent Indian personalities such as Mahatma Gandhi, Rabindranath Tagore and Jawaharlal Nehru highlighting their contribution towards India and their progressive views on humanism. Anand has also written many short stories about India’s rich culture and tradition. His later works are regarded as an attempt to undertake a spiritual journey searching for one’s higher level of self-awareness.

Introducing the Novel

Untouchable is one of the most celebrated novels in Indian English literature for its realistic rendering of the life of a sweeper boy named Bakha who is an untouchable. E.M. Forster describes him in the Preface to the novel, “Bakha is a real individual, lovable, thwarted, sometimes grand, sometimes weak and thoroughly Indian. Even his physique is distinctive; we can recognize his broad intelligent face, graceful torso, and heavy buttocks as he does his nasty job or steps out in artillery boots in hope of a pleasant walk through the city with a paper packet of cheap sweets in his hand.” This novel shows a realistic picture of all the oppressed section of the society during the pre-independence period of India. Bakha, the protagonist of the novel, is representative of all the downtrodden people of the country who faced discrimination and suppression due to their caste. Bakha and other characters in the novel suffer due to the fact that they belong to the lower caste. We get a bleak vision of their place of living as described in the beginning of the novel, “The outcastes’ colony was a group of mud-walled houses that clustered together in two rows, under the shadow both of the town and the cantonment but outside their boundaries and separate from them. There lived the scavengers, the leather-workers, the washer men, the barbers, the water-carriers, the grass-cutters and other outcastes from Hindu society.” These sections of people suffer because they are by birth regarded as outcastes by others. Mulk Raj Anand has brought to lime light the artificiality and hypocrisy of the upper caste men especially men like Pandit KaliNath who preaches good things in life but is himself corrupted to the core.

Untouchable is the story of a single day in the life of Bakha and gives an account of the humiliation and struggle that he and other lower caste people had to go through. Bhaka was dissatisfied with his profession as a toilet cleaner and wanted to pursue a better life by educating himself. The lower caste people were restricted from drawing water from wells, enter temples or touch anything as it was believed that things would become polluted if they were touched by untouchables. Bakha was also subjected to mental and physical abuse mainly by the upper caste Hindus. Even his sister was sexually assaulted by Pandit Kalinath who called her to clean the courtyard of his house. He was attracted by Sohini’s youthful beauty and tried to touch her but when Sohini shouted the Pandit turned the situation by claiming that he was touched by an untouchable and puts the blame entirely on Sohini. Bakha arrives at the place and sends Sohini back. Although he was furious with anger, he did not say anything and left the scene. He comes home and tells his father that people think they are dirty simply because they clean the dirt. He feels that it is a curse which he should destroy as soon as possible. That afternoon he attends the marriage of Ram Charan’s sister whom he loved once but could not marry due to their class difference. Later in the evening Bakha goes to play hockey match at Havilder Charat Singh’s place. In the midst of the game a little boy is wounded and Bakha tries to help him but he is rebuked by the boy’s mother for having polluted her son. Bakha feels quite dejected as he faces humiliation all around him. However on one occasion Bhaka gets inspired after listening to Gandhi’s thoughts about untouchability which he regarded as a malpractice and wanted people to get rid of it. The novelist provides three different alternatives to ensure a better life to the protagonist and the people of his community. Bakha was advised by Col. Hutchinson to convert to Christianity that is devoid of any caste system and he would never face discrimination in his life any more. Moreover Gandhi’s views on untouchability and the education he imparted to these outcasts have enlightened people to a great deal. At the end of the novel, we find that Bhaka meets a poet named Iqbal Nath Sarshar who informs him about a new technique of cleaning faecal matter automatically, that is, toilet-flush machines. This would not require human effort to clean excreta and put an end to manually cleaning toilets. Bakha regards this to be a solution for his problem and feels that a transformation will surely take place to improve his condition of living.

Characterisation in the novel

Bakha- He is the protagonist of the novel and introduced to the readers as a young man who has a strongly built body. He works as a sweeper and cleans public toilets. Bakha maintains cleanliness throughout his work and remains cautious so as not to spoil his sleeves while doing his job. The hard labour that he puts in his work is responsible for the making of his strong physique. Bakha is a representative of all the underdogs who suffer at the hands of the society for their low caste. Throughout the novel we see that Bakha struggles for the search of his own identity and tries to find the significance of his life.

Lakha- He is Bakha’s father and a Jamedar of the sweepers of Bulandshahr. He is left with three children after his wife died. He accepts that he occupies an inferior status in the society and is submissive towards the upper caste Hindus.

Rakha- He is Bakha’s younger brother who is not involved in cleaning and sweeping work and does not possess a good appearance as his brother’s.

Sohini -She is Bakha’s sister and is described as an attractive woman who has a sylph-like form and a slender waist. She is an important character in the novel as it is through her Anand exposes the corruption of the upper caste Hindus. She takes take care of her family and manages the household chores. Pandit Kalinath’s attempt of her molestation is a significant episode in the novel that highlights the hypocrisy and injustice done by the upper castes towards the down trodden people.

Charat Singh -He is a Havilder in the army and also a good hockey player who belongs to the 38th Dogra battalion. He is a kind hearted person and is free from any kind of caste prejudices. He treats Bakha affectionately and is seen as a contrast to the orthodox priests.

Col. Hutchinson- He is one of the English characters in the novel who dresses in a funny way mixing Western and Indian outfits. He is the person who advises Bakha to become a Christian.

Iqbal Nath Sarshar -He is a young poet with revolutionary ideas and a progressive outlook who is strongly against the practice of untouchability. He provides a solution to eradicate this curse of the society. According to him, the introduction of flush system in toilets will help to remove this evil.

Themes and Issues in the Novel

The Practice of Untouchability

Mulk Raj Anand’s purpose in writing Untouchables was to bring about a change in the perception that people had in their minds regarding the untouchables. He says in “Why I Write”,

Untouchable depicts the lives of the marginalized and the destitute people of an orthodox Indian society. The practice of untouchability is rampant as the author tells the story of Bakha, an untouchable sweeper boy. The novel is an indictment of the snobbery and hypocrisy seen in the upper caste section of a Hindu society. The untouchables referred to as the Panchamas are forced to live the life of an outcast in a deplorable condition. E.M. Forster opines, “The sweeper is worse off than a slave, for the slave may change his master and his duties and may even become free, but the sweeper is bound for ever, born into a state from which he can’t escape and where he is excluded from social intercourse and the consolation of his religion. Unclean himself he pollutes other when he touches them…”

The untouchables live an isolated life far away from the village. In the novel we are told that they cannot even draw water from the wells as it might be contaminated by their touch. One can refer to Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things where Velutha also faces a similar kind of discrimination. In Untouchables, the Panchamas wait for long hours in the hope that some people of an upper caste might come and be kind enough to draw water for them. Bakha’s sister, Sohini, also goes through the same situation and waits near a well for someone to come and pour water into her pot. After a long wait, Kalinath who is attracted by her beauty arrives and helps her but his intention was to take advantage of her by calling her to his house and molesting her. Bakha is outraged by the incident and complains to his father about this. His father, Lakha remains indifferent and does not react at all as he has compromised with his state of living. He readily accepts the Hindu system of untouchability and thus this practice is passed down to their next generations as there is no fight against it. The Panchamas are quite responsible for their own miseries.

We get the description of the uncongenial place where these untouchables live, “The absence of a drainage system had, through the rains of various seasons, made of the quarter a marsh which gave out the most offensive smell.” The people of the untouchable caste were washer men, grass cutters, water men, sweepers, barbers and others who lived in mud-walled cottages huddled with each other and are socially isolated from the rest of the village. One day Bakha had accidently touched an upper caste Hindu in a market place. That person was so infuriated that he abused Bakha by addressing him as a ‘swine dog’, ‘dirty dog’ and so on. Every one present in the situation saw him getting insulted but no one spoke a word against it. Bakha ashamed as he was fell down on his knees and silently listened to all the insults that were targeted to him. At last a Muslim tongawallah rescued him from the situation. Bakha was so shattered by the incident that he burst out into anger,

Untouchability is one of the most evil practices of caste system in India which prevails even now in many of the socially and economically backward places. Great personalities like Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. B.R. Ambedkar have spoken on this issue and its eradication from the society for the upliftment of the people. They have opined that no society can ever progress if its people are prejudiced against this kind of casteist mentality. In the novel we see that Gandhi appears on the scene where he delivers a lecture on untouchability which comforts and encourages Bakha and other people of his community,

Social Realism: Religion and Caste Discrimination

Mulk Raj Anand has been truly regarded as a social realist for the themes and issues that he brings forward in his works. The social aspect of the novel that is the treatment of religion and caste discrimination has been delineated in a realistic manner. The novelist begins with a realistic description of the untouchables’ colony,

The central character of the novel, Bakha, is ill-treated by the high-caste people throughout the novel. The novel comprises of events of a single day and from the morning itself we are given a glimpse of how Bakha is subjected to abuses and treated like an animal. A high caste Hindu throws away a packet of cigarette at him and when he is hungry he is given chapattis in a way as food is thrown to a dog. His experience with a Hindu at a market place is suggestive of how much the place was steeped in caste-discrimination,

Bakha is humiliated but helpless and remains silent at the situation. Later his frustration is seen when he says, “…All of them abused, abused, abused why are we always abused? … Because we are sweepers… I am a sweeper, sweeper-untouchable I am an untouchable!”

Religion plays an important role in the novel for we see its influence upon the people of the society to a great extent. Col. Hutchinson urges Bakha to adopt Christianity to overcome his deplorable condition. However Bakha is skeptical about converting his own religion and is suspicious about the missionary’s intention. Bakha thought, “If he (Lakha) saw him (Colonel) in the distance, saying that the old sahib had wanted to convert them to the religion of Yessuh Messih and to make them sahibs like himself, but that he had refused to leave the Hindu fold, saying that the religion which was good enough for his forefathers was good enough for him.”

Anand captures the predicament of the untouchables and presents a harsh reality. We see that they are denied even the basic need of life that is water. We see how these people were prohibited to touch wells that would otherwise pollute them. The novelist is indeed quite powerful in his rendering of the plight of the untouchables with his acute observation and the regional language that he adopts and the use of abuses clearly shows the social realism with which he has presented the curse of untouchability. Anand has also criticized the followers of the Hindu religion who belong to the upper caste. People in the name of religion have suppressed lives of many innocents who are not given an equal status and opportunity to live in the society. Some religious scriptures have made a division or hierarchical order based on castes for smooth running of the society. But people seem to have misinterpreted and used it for their own ends. In the novel the character of Kalinath presents the hypocrisy and corruption that some people are engaged in to exploit the ignorant and the downtrodden people. Although he is strongly against touching any untouchable and considers it to be a sin but the carnal desire in him for Bakha’s sister, Sohini, speaks of how irreligious he was and the lack of any spiritual quality in him. He tries to molest her by inviting her to his house to clean the courtyard. Through this episode Anand tries to present a harsh reality that not all the preachers of religion are morally right at their heart and that we should not welcome blind beliefs and caste discrimination in the name of religion. His primary concern was to uplift this lot of people who were socially unaccepted and isolated. By bringing in the Mahatma Gandhi’s episode, Anand has not only provided a solution for the plight of the untouchables in the novel but also enlightened his readers about such evil practices that need to be removed from the society. Gandhi comments that the predicament of the untouchables is both a moral and a religious issue. He says that untouchability is the “greatest blot on Hinduism” and regards it ‘satanic’ to think that anyone in Hinduism is born as an untouchable. Gandhi holds the view that untouchables have to “cultivate habits of cleanliness” and be free from unhealthy habits such as drinking liquor or gambling. He also says that they must “cease to accept leavings from the plates of high-caste Hindus, however clean they may be represented to be.”

Gandhi regards all Indians as equal and expresses his desire to be reborn as an untouchable. He addresses them with a new name ‘Harijan’ and considers them to be the cleaners of Hindu religion. Although Gandhi’s words instil a ray of hope in Bakha and other people but Bakha “…..began to move. His virtues lay in his close-knit sinews and in his long breath sense. He was thinking of everything that he had heard though he could not understand it all. He was calm as he walked along, though the conflict in his soul was not over, though he was torn between his enthusiasm for Gandhi and the difficulties in his own awkward naive self.”

The closing of the novel appropriates Bakha’s inner conflicts between enthusiasm and naiveté. This is a consequence of what Bakha has experienced during the whole day and its indelible impact upon him due to which he situates himself within his own culture. Bakha’s interaction with the poet Iqbal Nath Sarshar and his ideas about the flush toilet system also provided him some hope for the future. The novel ends with a hint that the situation of this exploited class will undergo a positive change as Bakha thinks, “Perhaps I can find the poet some day and ask him about his machine”

Narrative Style and Technique

The novel is quite impressive due to its narrative style and technique. Anand employs the stream of consciousness technique which was a dominant characteristic in most of the writings of the period especially by Woolf, Joyce and others. The stream of consciousness method is used to delve deep into the mind of the central character, Bakha, who is tormented by the treatment of the society towards him and his fellow beings. It can be regarded as a psychological novel as well for it gives us a vivid account of Bakha’s thoughts and ponderings most of which are fragmentary in nature. The novel also has a dream sequence in which Bakha finds himself surrounded by a group of monkeys. The novelists purpose through this was to show Bakha’s views about the world which even in his subconscious mind haunts him and confines him within a bleak world. There are also a number of flashbacks used along with symbolic images and thoughts combined with an awareness of the reality that renders a modern touch to the novel. Anand uses a number of images that are recurrent in the novel, mostly the image of the sun and the river. The sun is the symbol of creative and vital force of life and is seen as a contrast to the lives of the people,

The image of the river is symbolic of the anguish and grief of the people as it stands for the flow of existence which is past change. The novelist uses a number of words, idioms and phrases in English which reflect the Indian way of speaking. There are many words in Hindi and Punjabi that have not been translated into English like girja ghar, jalebi, babu, Harijan whereas some abusive words in Hindi have been translated into English like son of a pig, swine dog and others. The aim was to capture the flavor and colour of a particular village in Punjab during pre- independence times and give a realistic representation of it.

Story-board

Mulk Raj Anand: Life and Works

  • He was born in Peshawar in 1905 and received his early education in Khalsa College Amritsar.
  • While he was doing his Ph.D. in Cambridge University he had close acquaintance with the Bloomsbury Group.
  • His most famous novels include Untouchable (1935), Coolie (1936), Two Leaves And A Bud (1937), The Village (1939), Across the Black Waters (1941), The Sword and the Sickle (1942) and The Big Heart (1945).
  • He was honoured with the Sahitya Akademi Award for Morning Face (1968).

Untouchable

  • This novel shows a realistic picture of all the oppressed section of the society during the pre-independence period of India.
  • Bakha, the protagonist of the novel, is representative of all the downtrodden people of the country who faced discrimination and suppression due to their caste.
  • He and other characters in the novel suffer due to the fact that they belong to the lower caste.

Themes and Issues in the novel:

  • Untouchable depicts the lives of the marginalized and the destitute people of an orthodox Indian society.
  • The novel is an indictment of the snobbery and hypocrisy seen in the upper caste section of a Hindu society.
  • In the novel we are told that the untouchables referred to as panchamas cannot even draw water from the wells as it might be contaminated by their touch.
  • The social aspect of the novel that is the treatment of religion and caste discrimination has been delineated in a realistic manner.
  • The central character of the novel, Bakha, is ill-treated by the high-caste people throughout the novel.
  • In the novel the character of Kalinath who is a religious man, presents the hypocrisy and corruption that some people are engaged in to exploit the ignorant and the downtrodden people.

Narrative Structure:

  • Anand employs the stream of consciousness technique in the novel.
  • The stream of consciousness method is used to delve deep into the mind of the central character, Bakha, who is tormented by the treatment of the society towards him and his fellow beings.
  • There are also a number of flashbacks used along with symbolic images and thoughts combined with an awareness of the reality that renders a modern touch to the novel.
  • Anand, Mulk Raj, Untouchable, New Delhi: Arnold Publishers, 1981
  • Sinha, Krishna Nandan, Indian Writing in English., University of Michigan: Heritage, 1979 Cowasjee, Saros, So Many Freedoms, Delhi, O.U.P., 1977
  • Dhawan, R.K., ed. The Novels of Mulk Raj Anand, New York: Prestige, 1992
  • Fisher, Marlene, The Wisdom of the Heart, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers, 1985
  • Narasimhaiah, C.D., The Swan And The Eagle, Shimla: Indian Institute of Advanced Study, 1969
  • Paul, Premila, The Novels of Mulk Raj Anand: A Thematic Study, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd., 1983
  • Singh, P.K., Major Indo-English Novelists & Novels, Jaipur: Sublime Publication, 2001
  • Walsh, William, Indian Literature in English, London: Longman, 1990
  • Williams, H. M., Studies in Modern Indian Novel in English Vol. I, Calcutta: Writers Workshop, 1973
  • isj.org.uk/mulk-raj-anand-novelist-and-fighter/
  • ijellh.com/gandhism-mulk-raj-anands-untouchable/

Essay on Untouchability in India for Students and Children 1000 Words

Essay on Untouchability in India for Students and Children 1000 Words

Here, you will read an Essay on Untouchability in India for Students and Children in 1000 Words. This includes Introduction, meaning, laws, reasons, and steps to eradicate untouchability.

Table of Contents

Introduction (Essay on Untouchability in India)

India has the largest democracy and is divided into many castes and religions. Sleep deprivation is a serious problem for Indian society in India. Unnoticed are diseases that cause other problems in our country . Non-sleepers are like termites that throw our country from within.

There are many problems in our country, but the surprises are very serious and deadly. Some scholars say that undeniable sin is a sin against humans and God. Unimaginable is a trademark that tilted its head in shame.

Meaning of Untouchability

Untouchability refers to an age-old practice of exclusion of minority groups from the mainstream by social custom or legal mandate. The term is generally associated with Dalit communities in India, who were considered “ polluting “.

It is believed that the touching of untouchables, even their shadow, makes the upper caste people ‘impure’ and they have to bathe in the holy Ganges-water to regain their purity.

Untouchability as Per Constitution

Untouchability in India was abolished by the Constitution, which came into force from 26 January 1950. The Untouchability Offenses Act was passed in 1955 to stop the practice of untouchability.

By this law, untouchability was declared a crime and the provision of punishment for it. The practice of untouchability in India has been declared a punishable offence under Article 14. Article 14 is following.

‘Untouchability’ is abolished and its conduct in any form is prohibited. It would be an offence to apply any disability arising out of untouchability, which would be punishable according to law.

Reasons of Untouchability in India

1. ethnic factors.

One of the root causes of untouchability is racial considerations. There are numerous tribes in India, but the developed and cultured Aryans defeated the Indian tribes.

The conqueror always considers him superior to the backward and worse than the other castes. According to some scholars, the Aryan invaders gave some derogatory names to the non-Aryan castes that settled in India and regarded them as untouchables.

A separate branch of the Naga tribe of Assam is not allowed to wear ivory ornaments on both hands. This ban was imposed on those people because they were indifferent to the racial attitudes of other Naga tribes.

As a result, over time the whole system has become so rigid that such people are considered untouchables.

2. Religious Issues

Religious elements are another cause of untouchability. Religious rituals, beliefs and convention rules play an important role in untouchability.

Religion is given an important place in righteousness and divinity. These are essential in motivating people to stop engaging in illicit business.

3. Social Aspects

Social factors are also equally important in maintaining untouchability. Religious and ethnic causes recognize social customs and justify the prevalence of untouchability. Hutton believes that the origins of the system are partly racial, religious, and partly a matter of social customs.

Steps to Remove Untouchability in India

After the independence period, several practical steps and measures were taken to remove or eradicate untouchability through constitutional and legal action. As untouchables or Dalits have been competing for centuries, it is natural for them to grow up without special help.

Constitutional Provisions

The basis of the administration, which is the Constitution of India , does not tolerate such discrimination. Its entire structure is based on the equal treatment of the citizens of this country. Articles 15 and 16 and 17 make explicit provisions in this regard.

Seat Reservation

The Constitution of India provides that seats for scheduled castes should be reserved for elected and administrative bodies and institutions. Departmental candidates are reserved even during examinations.

The age limit is also relaxed for Harijans to come up. There is also an exception to the standard of compatibility. The High Power Committee will be constituted from time to time to review the progress made in the recruitment cases for the various posts.

Career Guidance

The government has been provided to provide employment and employment guidance to the untouchables. A pre-test and training center for All India Civil Service has been opened in Allahabad and Madras.

Similarly, training centres were set up for state service examinations. Coaching-cum-guiding centres are located in Delhi, Jabalpur and Madras. These centers are intended to assist the SCS in obtaining adequate employment in government and the private sector.

Establishment of Advisory Bodies

Provision has been made to establish various advisory bodies to advise the Government on various issues of Scheduled Castes.

The President of India has appointed the Scheduled Castes Commissioner to look into all matters about the actual implementation of the Scheduled Castes safeguards and to compile a comprehensive report as per the requirements of the Constitution.

NGOs are also set up for the welfare of scheduled castes. The Harijan Sevak Sangh is the most active of such organizations.

Also, Ishwar Saran Ashram, Allahabad and Hindi Sweeper Sangh, New Delhi, Servants of Indian Society, Poona and All India Backward Class Association, are some other charities working for the welfare of Scheduled Castes in Delhi.

As a result, one way of their advancement is to make reservations for so-called Harijans in the electoral and administrative setting so they can use it as a launching pad for social development. Ladder, and achieve their proper place in society.

Educational Opportunities

Indian Government has taken lots of steps to provide the free and best education to the communities who are deprived of excellent education since years.

Government offers them a scholarship, seat reservations and age relaxation so that they come and take a wonderful education.

Views on Untouchability

Untouchability not only means non-touching. It also mean ‘touching and touching’ problem in common language. The practice of untouchability in India has been declared a punishable offence under Article 14.

The first reason of untouchability is the development of racial feeling. Some species consider themselves superior to other species. Apart from racial and religious reasons, untouchability also has social causes.

This is a very ancient practice, which has its roots firmly in our society and its people. Although difficult, it is not impossible to change people’s minds and see them of all classes equally and give fair treatment to all.

It will ensure peace and harmony among the residents of society and ensure satisfaction to all. All people should be equal in the eyes of law and no one should be discriminated against and dominated based on race, colour, caste, material features etc. needed. I hope you liked this informative Essay on Untouchability in India.

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Essay on “Mahatma Gandhi and Untouchability” for school, College Students, Long and Short English Essay, Speech for Class 10, Class 12, College and Competitive Exams.

Essay on “mahatma gandhi and untouchability”.

Gandhiji’s service to uplift the untouchables is significant. Just like Dr. Ambedkar, Gandhiji worked hard against the problems of untouchables. He himself belonged to Vaishya caste. During his early years, he was a strict believer of caste system, but with the passage of time, his views changed. He recognized the evils faced by the untouchables living in the Hindu society.

Gandhiji considered untouchability as a blot on humanity. He worked hard to improve their condition by attaining Swaraj for them. Swaraj, according to him was not only self-government or political independence but also social freedom for them.

Gandhiji set up several ashramas where people of different caste lived, worked and ate together. Thus, gradually caste rigidity disappeared. Number of mass movements like Non-cooperation movement, Civil Disobedience movement and Quit India movement were initiated by Gandhiji. Thousands of common people participated in these movements. People belonging to different castes came together and took part by forgetting their caste differences.

Gandhiji called the untouchables by the name of ‘Harijan’. meaning, `Children of God’. HarijanSevakSingh, started by Gandhiji, was a society working for the upliftment of people belonging to untouchable caste. He also started a Gujarati periodical called ‘Harijan’.

Gandhi focused on removal of untouchability with an energy and enthusiasm that was unique in the history of Indian social and political movements. Gandhi believed that if untouchability was not dealt, it could lead to the destruction of Hinduism itself.

In 1932, the British Prime Minister announced the Communal Award in which untouchables were given separate electorate in the Parliament. Gandhiji realized that this would break the unity of people. To protest it, he started fast up to death. It was during this period Dr. Ambedkar signed Poona Pact with Gandhiji where he agreed not to give separate electorates to the untouchables. However, he asked for the increase in number of seats for the untouchables.

Once Gandhiji said, ‘I was wedded to the work for the extinction of `untouchability’ long before I was wedded to my wife. There were two occasions in our joint life when there was choice between working for the untouchables and remaining with my wife and I would have preferred the first. Thanks to my good wife, the crisis was averted. In my ashram, which is my family, I have several untouchables and a sweet but naughty girl living as my own daughter.”

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Untouchability Essay | Essay on Untouchability for Students and Children in Englis

untouchability essay meaning in english

Untouchability Essay: Untouchability is the method of discrimination based on their production team and work among different individuals and groups. Untouchability has long been taught. The untouchables are usually treated inhumanely because they are from the lower caste. In almost all places, they have suffered various types of discrimination.

The term Dalit is derived from Sanskrit, meaning broken or downtrodden. Many claim that the untouchability regime still prevails in India, but also in other countries, such as Japan, Tibet and Korea.Vedic texts separating citizens into four key classes have been used to distinguish castes from: Brahmans priests and elite citizens; Kshatrijas warriors; valishias small entrepreneurs and merchants; and Shudras health care staff. Throughout ancient India, these differences were mainly based on caste and the profession of the people.

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Long and Short Essays on Untouchability for Students and Kids in English

Given below is the long essay of 400-500 words and is suitable for students of Classes 7,8,9 and 10 and a Short Essay on Untouchability nearly 100-150 words for the students of Classes 1,2,3,4,5 and 6.

Long Essay on Untouchability 500 Words in English

Untouchability is not really special in India; until many centuries ago it was practiced in many parts of The European Union and the Japanese still has many ‘untouchables,’ known as burakumin. But this program remains closely related to culture, faith, history and current politics with the Indian subcontinent. Today in India, more than 169 million people, men, women and young children, are considered to be untouchable and the changes in many of the cases, in spite of legal protections and amendments by the government of the Indian Caste System, have been slower and four caste groups in Hindu world. Brahmines are the found, Kshatriya players and Vaishya traders, the Sudras carry out tedious tasks.

The highest level of the interpersonal hierarchy is Brahmins and the lowest is Sudras. The ties between the community and their sub-castes have been regulated by religious and ethical laws for thousands of years the most important of which is known as Manu Dharma Sastra and also Manu Smriti, which is believed to have already been written on the early Common Era. The Manu Smriti claims that the first aspect of Brahmin’s name must be somewhat favorable, that the brand of Kshatriya must be connected with influence, and that the name of Vaishya should imply wealth. The first part of a Sudra brand should be disdainful and the second half, because of its low beginning, should imply support and modesty.

Only the upper castes are entitled to study the Vedas, according to the Hindu practice. The upper kind is the wedding thread, which takes place only as a wedding rite so that they can finally be called a double-born wedding.

There is positive discrimination in colleges, universities and state jobs and all people from socially and financially backward regions in society are reserved a proportion of their seats and jobs. The practice of untouchability continues, however, and the Dalits remain outside cities, excommunicated by society. They are refused entry into waters or temples, are forbidden from sharing communal wells, maybe forced through separate glasses to drink water in some non-urban cafes, plus frequently harassed or mistreated if signs of mistrust are seen.

Following numerous protests and battling to eradicate untouchability, legislation has been implemented in the Constitution to address the needs of the marginalized groups. Untouchability was abolished and defined as a criminal act in Article 17 of the Indian Constitution. There is no way that anyone can limit the entry to temples, streets, buses, and so on of the Dalits or Harijans. All public services are free to be used with dignity and respect. Furthermore, no one can refuse to sell the Dalit people anything.

These castes are also reserved by the government. Booking means that the population of the lower class is allocated a certain proportion of the seats at government colleges and jobs. This thus guarantees that the development of the present and future is not influenced by the injustice in the past. The reservation also seeks to provide them with a fair opportunity to receive an education that will benefit them and their families and future generations.

Short Essay on Untouchability 150 Words in English

The definition of untouchability today varies from that of ancient India. People become more conscious and adapt themselves to rational thinking. In spite of constitutional amendments, untouchability and caste prejudice still reign in society. Politicians are using it to increase their voting banks and win political control.

Compared to those living in rural areas, the Dalits living in cities are less vulnerable to this discrimination practice. Rural people prefer to follow their conventional convictions, practices and refuse to accept changes to improve society.

Everyone in the eyes of the law is equal. On the basis of their caste, we won’t discriminate and dominate others. Our children should be told of the value of empathy, kindness and equality for all. The Dalits are mainly discriminated against for their jobs, like public areas for cleaning, etc. Ultimately, when our society remains clean and safe, we shall value them most. The new generation should then take over and seek to eradicate it entirely.

10 Lines on Untouchability Essay in English

  • Touchlessness means a group of people being isolated from the mainstream.
  • The society is divided by caste.
  • This results in the loss of a particular community’s dignity and low self-esteem.
  • It restricts discrimination in the discriminated community’s social, economic and educational development.
  • Since 1500-800 BC our culture has been defiling intactness.
  • This supports conversions of religions in society.
  • Social Justice and Empowerment Ministry oversee the evolution of communities silenced.
  • The government provides the students out of deprived areas with money aid together with free books and accommodation.
  • The 1955 Civil Rights Protection Act covers those who are subject to untouchability.
  • The Lower Caste financial and legal assistance is provided for by the Scheduled and Significant Stallions (Prevention of Atrocities) Act 1955.

FAQ’S on Untouchability Essay

Question 1. How does untouchability explain?

Answer: Untouchability is a practice that considers some people from lower caste to be kept at a distance, denied social equity and disabled by touch, contaminating or polluting those from higher castes.

Question 2. What are the reasons for this untouchability?

Answer: Top 3 Untouchability Causes – Explanation!

  • Racial factors: racial consideration is one of the fundamental causes of untouchability.
  • Religious factors: Another cause of untouchability was religious factors.
  • Social factors: Social factors also seem equally important in keeping untouchability.

Question 3. How have we treated untouchables?

Answer: Abuse of human rights, known as dalits, is legion on those people. There was a mistake. The Indians Untouchables are protected from the lowest jobs and are constantly afraid that Hindus from the highest caste are publicly humiliated, unclothed, paraded, raped and beaten with wild abandon.

Question 4. How can I remove untouchability?

Answer: The evil practice of untouchability can be eliminated the following suggestions:

  • Training spread
  • Buildings Economic
  • Infrastructures to accommodate
  • Systems for work
  • Dirty annexation enfranchisement
  • Caste system abolition
  • Promotion of marriages between castes
  • Untouchability misinformation

Question 5. Who started untouchability in India?

Answer: The Satya Shodak Samaj ‘s founder, Jyotiba Phule, is thought to have coined the term Dalit, a Non-Brahmin movement of Maharashtra. He used the term to call the caste-based social division in Indian society the victim of the untouchable and outcaste people.

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  1. Essay on Untouchability For Students in English

    Untouchability is a harmful and unjust practice that needs to be eradicated. However, we can't just abolish it overnight and expect things to go smoothly. There would likely be a period in which chaos and violence erupt on the streets as people fight over power and resources (sound familiar). Essay on Untouchability

  2. Essay on Untouchability: Meaning, Evil Effects and Suggestions for Its

    It damages social harmony. 3. It has created wide social distance between the two groups, touchable and untouchables. 4. Untouchability perpetuates inequality. 5. It cannot support the development of healthy democratic tradition. 6. Untouchability has damaged the self-image and prestige of the scheduled castes.

  3. Essay on Untouchability for Students and Children

    Untouchability is the practice of discriminating various individuals and groups based on their cast and the jobs done by them. Untouchability is practiced for a very long time. It works on the Indian caste system hierarchy. The untouchables usually bear inhuman treatment because they belong to the lower caste.

  4. Untouchability

    Untouchability is a form of social institution that legitimises and enforces practices that are discriminatory, humiliating, exclusionary and exploitative against people belonging to certain social groups. Although comparable forms of discrimination are found all over the world, untouchability involving the caste system is largely unique to ...

  5. How To Use "Untouchability" In A Sentence: Proper Usage Tips

    In its simplest form, untouchability can be defined as the act of considering certain individuals or groups as socially impure or polluting, thereby excluding them from participating in various social, religious, and economic activities.

  6. Essay on Untouchability in English for Students

    The meaning of this obstacle i.e. untouchability is - when we do not go near anyone because he is not fit to touch. It has been seen that in our society some members or people are not touched and when a person does not touch his touched or touched things and does not even come near them, then it is called untouchability.

  7. Untouchability Essay

    Untouchability Essay: Untouchability is the method of discrimination based on their production team and work among different individuals and groups. Untouchability has long been taught. The untouchables are usually treated inhumanely because they are from the lower caste. In almost all places, they have suffered various types of discrimination.

  8. Essay on Untouchability

    Untouchability, a social evil deeply rooted in the caste system of India, is a form of discrimination that segregates individuals based on their birth status. This age-old practice, originating from the Vedic period, has been a subject of intense scrutiny and criticism due to its violation of fundamental human rights.

  9. Untouchability Definition & Meaning

    noun un· touch· abil· i· ty ˌən-ˌtə-chə-ˈbi-lə-tē : the quality or state of being untouchable especially : the state of being an untouchable Examples of untouchability in a Sentence Recent Examples on the Web Maybe not even Serbian untouchability.

  10. Essay on Untouchability for Children and Students

    Untouchability is the practice in which certain groups of people are discriminated and alienated based on their caste and culture and are subjected to inhumane treatment. This practice has prevailed since a long time in our society and is the major outcome of caste system. Who are the untouchables?

  11. Essay on Untouchability for Children and Students

    Untouchability Essay 1 (200 Words) The practice of untouchability can be defined as the discrimination of certain groups of people and their inhuman treatment based on their castes and social groups. Untouchability is a practice so old that it is embedded tightly onto roots of many people in India.

  12. English

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  15. Untouchability Essay

    Untouchability in its most basic sense is the practice of alienating a particular group of people based on their caste and other social customs. It is one of the many outcomes of the caste system in India. Untouchability is present in India since centuries. It is considered to be one of the most heinous social crimes.

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    Essay on "Untouchability" for Kids and Students, English, Paragraph, Speech for Class 8, 9, 10, 12, College and Competitive Exams. ... social reformers in India raised their voice against this problem. It was Mahatma Gandhi, who termed them as Harijans, meaning the offspring of God. Gandhiji was very much against this evil practice of ...

  17. Essay on the Untouchability

    Essay on the Untouchability. Essay on the Untouchability - The practice of 'untouchability' is a stigma attached to the Hindu society. It is an age-old one. It has its roots deep down in our social and religious system. Gandhiji regarded this practice as "a leper wound in the whole body of Hindu politic". He even considered it as ...

  18. 1 Minute Speech on Untouchability In English

    Wikipedia defines the term as follows: "Untouchability is a form of a social institution that legitimises and enforces practices that are discriminatory, humiliating, exclusionary and exploitative against people belonging to certain social groups.". Loaded 0%. Untouchability is a social evil. It is a crime to consider it a sin to touch a ...

  19. Untouchability: Mulk Raj Anand: Untouchables

    Mulk Raj Anand was one of the most prolific writers of the period who is best known as a social realist and a humanist. He was born in Peshawar in 1905 and received his early education in Khalsa College Amritsar. Later he went to England and got admitted to University College London as an undergraduate. He then attended Cambridge University and ...

  20. Untouchability

    Untouchability is the practise of discrimination against various individuals and groups on the basis of their caste and occupation. Untouchability has been practised for an extremely long period of time. It is based on the Indian caste system. Untouchables frequently face inhuman treatment as a result of their lower caste status.

  21. Essay on Untouchability in India for Students and Children 1000 Words

    Untouchability refers to an age-old practice of exclusion of minority groups from the mainstream by social custom or legal mandate. The term is generally associated with Dalit communities in India, who were considered " polluting ".

  22. Essay on "Mahatma Gandhi and Untouchability"

    Essay on "Mahatma Gandhi and Untouchability" for school, College Students, Long and Short English Essay, Speech for Class 10, Class 12, College and Competitive Exams.

  23. Untouchability Essay

    Untouchability Essay: Untouchability is the method of discrimination based on their production team and work among different individuals and groups. Untouchability has long been taught. The untouchables are usually treated inhumanely because they are from the lower caste. In almost all places, they have suffered various types of discrimination. The term Dalit is derived from …