• the wind knows my name
  • the soul of a woman
  • a long petal of the sea
  • in the midst of winter
  • la ninfa de porcelana
  • the japanese lover
  • maya’s notebook
  • island beneath the sea
  • the sum of our days
  • inés of my soul
  • forest of the pygmies
  • kingdom of the golden dragon
  • my invented country
  • city of the beasts
  • portrait in sepia
  • daughter of fortune
  • the infinite plan
  • the stories of eva luna
  • of love and shadows
  • the house of the spirits

Isabel Allende

Looking for Isabel Allende book releases 2023? Would you like to know when the next  Isabel Allende new books are coming out? We’ve got you covered! We’ve compiled latest and upcoming Isabel Allende new books guide. This is your one-stop for all new Isabel Allende upcoming books 2023 and beyond.

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Isabel Allende Book Releases 2023/2024

As of March 6th, 2023 , Isabel Allende has 2 new or upcoming book releases .

Check out Isabel Allende’s next book below as it could be your favorite yet. Be sure to bookmark this page and check back for more new books 2023, 2024 and beyond as they are announced!

Isabel Allende New Books

The Wind Knows My Name

Stay tuned for Isabel Allende upcoming books in 2023 and beyond. Plus, look back on our 2022 book releases and check out our 2023 book releases to be the first to know when the latest and next new books from your other favorite authors are released.

Other Readers Also Checked Out These New Books

Lady’s Well (DCI Ryan Mystery #20)

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Isabel Allende

by BooksRelease.com | May 27, 2020

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Isabel Allende 2022/2023 RELEASES

Searching for new Isabel Allende releases 2022/2023 ? Eager for Isabel Allende new book 2022 ? Can’t wait for Isabel Allende 2022 book releases ? You’ve come to the perfect place! We’ve compiled Isabel Allende upcoming books in one dedicated resource. Check out Isabel Allende 2021 releases and Isabel Allende books 2022.

Isabel Allende NEW BOOK RELEASES 2022/2023

With so many books releasing in 2022 and 2023, it can be difficult to track the newest Isabel Allende books and next Isabel Allende releases. Here at BooksRelease.com, we do the hard work for you, giving you more time to enjoy the recent, new and upcoming Isabel Allende releases along with details about the author. Finding out about Isabel Allende upcoming books 2022/2023 (not to mention the latest Isabel Allende books 2021) has never been easier!

Bookmark this page and check back often to find your perfect Isabel Allende new book and be sure to explore more book releases coming out in 2021 , 2022 and beyond. Find the Isabel Allende next books below:

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Isabel Allende Biography

Isabel Allende Llona is a Chilean-American novelist. Allende, who writes in the "magic realism" tradition, is considered one of the first successful women novelists in Latin America. She has written novels based in part on her own experiences, often focusing on the experiences of women, weaving myth and realism together. She has lectured and done extensive book tours and has taught literature at several US colleges. She currently resides in California with her husband. Allende adopted U.S. citizenship in 2003.

Isabel Allende New Releases 2022

Excited for Isabel Allende new books ? There are recent and new Isabel Allende releases . Discover Isabel Allende book 2021 and Isabel Allende releases 2022 with our upcoming and latest Isabel Allende books list below:

A Long Petal Of The Sea By Isabel Allende: 2020 Historical Fiction Releases

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Isabel allende’s newest historical novel tells familiar story of refugee life.

Jeffrey Brown

Jeffrey Brown Jeffrey Brown

"A Long Petal of the Sea," a new historical novel by renowned writer Isabel Allende, draws upon events spanning from the Spanish civil war to the 1973 coup in her native Chile -- and with resonance for the experience of refugees today. Allende sits down with Jeffrey Brown to discuss how she drew on facts to tell her story, and why her last three books have dealt with the fates of displaced people.

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Judy Woodruff:

Finally tonight: Jeffrey Brown has a conversation with a much honored writer, Isabel Allende, whose new novel, "A Long Petal of the Sea," draws upon historical events spanning — spanning from the Spanish Civil War to the 1973 coup in her native Chile as inspiration.

It's part of our ongoing series on arts and culture, Canvas.

Jeffrey Brown:

In 1939, the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, then serving as a diplomat, commissioned a ship to help 2,000 Spanish War refugees make their way to Chile.

That and other historical episodes and figures over the next 50 years formed the backdrop of the new novel "A Long Petal of the Sea."

Author Isabel Allende experienced some of that history herself. An internationally renowned writer, her books have sold more than 70 million copies. In 2014, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from Barack Obama.

And she joins me now.

Nice to talk to you again.

Isabel Allende:

Hi. Nice to talk to you.

You're writing a big, sweeping, multi-character story. You have done this before. That's not new.

But this one is grounded in a very particular history, right?

In one event.

And this is the journey of a ship called Winnipeg, a cargo ship that transported 2,200 refugees from the civil war in Spain to Chile.

And what drew you to this story? What grabbed you?

I heard the story when I was a young kid.

I was born in 1942, and this happened in 1939. But some of those people were friends of my family. So I knew vaguely about it. But I really heard the story from one of the passengers when I was living in Venezuela.

So, there were real people involved.

Real people, yes.

And then you created the characters?

I created the fiction.

But the historical facts are so perfect for a novel that I didn't have to invent anything. It was a book easy to write. Everything was there. It wrote itself. I typed.

That's how it felt? Oh, you typed?

Yes. I just typed.

So, the two main characters are refugees from the civil war. Franco takes over. They're forced to leave to make their way to Chile, right?

Tell me a little bit about what happens to them.

Well, when they cross the border into France as refugees, they end up us as prisoners, practically, in a concentration camp.

The day that Franco attacked Barcelona — and that was the last bastion of the republica — half-a-million people walked to the border of France in a terrible winter day.

And what would France do with half-a-million refugees at the border? Eventually, they let them in, and they put them in concentration camps. It seems like a familiar story.

It does seem like one. And one can't read this without thinking about echoes even to today.

The narrative against the immigrants is now the same as it was 80 years ago.

And then they come to Chile. In Chile, they have a life. And then, in 1970, we had a government, a democratically-elected government, center-left, which was with a socialist president, Salvador Allende.

Three years later, the right wing, helped by the CIA, topple the government. And many people went again into exile as refugees, and among them, some of the ones that had come in the ship many years before.

So, life goes in a circle, you know? And from a historical point of view, it's fascinating.

How much did you rely on research, and how much of this is your imagination?

I have written several historical novels. And I researched the facts very much. So I want to be absolutely sure that that part is true, because that's the foundation.

If I have a solid foundation, I can create the fictional story on top of it, and it is believable. And my first responsibility as a fiction writer is for you, as a reader, to believe my story. So that's where facts come in. And they are real facts, not alternative facts.

And so you were telling me earlier that this book almost wrote itself, right?

Yes, because the story stands for itself.

But did — in a sense, are the characters writing themselves here, or are you creating the characters?

I think they write themselves, and they are pushed by their events.

They need to get on the ship. So I need to marry them. And those things happen in the process, that the events around their lives, that most of them are out of their control, decide what they do, in a way.

And I feel that that's my life. In my life, all the crossroads, all the moments when everything has changed has been completely out of my control, and my only choice has been to how I feel about it.

For me, it's easy to understand the feelings of all — of displacement, of leaving everything behind, of starting from scratch, or always looking back, thinking that you will go back someday.

There is a another real character in this book. And that's the poet Pablo Neruda, right, a very socially engaged and committed writer.

You use lines from his poetry at the beginning of each chapter. And it made me wonder how you feel — or do you feel a kind of responsibility as a writer, as an artist, to look at our times and address it?

It comes naturally. I don't want to deliver a message. I'm not a sociologist or a politician.

I just want to tell a story. But, sometimes, the story are in the air. We hear so much about refugees and migrants and displaced people, that my three last books deal with that in one way or another, because it's there. It's in the collective consciousness right now.

All right. The novel is "A Long Petal of the Sea."

Isabel Allende, thank you very much.

Thank you, Jeff.

So interesting.

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In his more than 30-year career with the NewsHour, Brown has served as co-anchor, studio moderator, and field reporter on a wide range of national and international issues, with work taking him around the country and to many parts of the globe. As arts correspondent he has profiled many of the world's leading writers, musicians, actors and other artists. Among his signature works at the NewsHour: a multi-year series, “Culture at Risk,” about threatened cultural heritage in the United States and abroad; the creation of the NewsHour’s online “Art Beat”; and hosting the monthly book club, “Now Read This,” a collaboration with The New York Times.

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Isabel Allende: ‘It’s easy to forget what a trailblazer she was’

A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende review – love on the run from Franco

T owards the end of Isabel Allende ’s expansive new book, its protagonist, Victor Dalmau, looks back over his 80 years. “My life has been a series of journeys. I’ve travelled from one side of the world to the other. I’ve been a foreigner without realising I had deep roots,” he says. In its simplicity and sagacity, it’s an observation that typifies Allende’s approach to one of her work’s most cohesive themes, a theme sharpened by her own life story: displacement.

Victor is still training to be a doctor in Barcelona when the Spanish civil war breaks out. His family are staunch republicans, and though he himself is no zealot, he’s soon engulfed in the bloody chaos of frontline medicine.

Lanky Victor is in many ways the opposite of his brother, Guillem, a handsome militiaman. When his parents take in one of his father’s best piano students, Roser Bruguera, it’s Guillem that she falls in love with. Yet by the time the war is over, Roser is heavily pregnant and alone, and it will be a slower, infinitely more pragmatic – and more interesting – love that the novel ultimately celebrates.

Along with some half a million other Spaniards fleeing Franco, Roser makes it to France, where she’s interned in the Argelès-sur-Mer concentration camp. Separately, Victor, too, is imprisoned there, before escaping to track her down in Perpignan, where she and her baby son are sheltering with a Quaker family. Acting out of fraternal loyalty rather than lust, Victor marries Roser so that she and his nephew can begin a new life with him in Chile.

It’s thanks to the poet Pablo Neruda that they get there. As happened in real life, Neruda has persuaded Chile’s president to provide asylum for a number of Spanish refugees, defying rightwing opposition and the Catholic church. Neruda fills the Winnipeg, a cargo ship built for 20 seamen, with more than 2,000 Spaniards. After a month at sea, they arrive on the day that the second world war breaks out in Europe.

Over the coming decades there will be plenty more challenges for Victor and Roser, not least General Pinochet’s coup, which will see them exiled again, this time to Venezuela, like Allende herself. But before that happens, they will have the chance to repay Neruda, hiding him in their home after communism is outlawed and a warrant is issued for his arrest.

When the poet moves on to another safe house, Victor realises how “his guest had filled every nook and cranny with his huge presence”. With his bulky shoulders and sharp gaze, Neruda sometimes threatens to do the same to Allende’s novel. His verse provides her title and each chapter’s epigram, and invades her cast’s thoughts, adding welcome bursts of colour in a narrative that, for large chunks, reads like well-paced but highly condensed nonfiction.

“I have had to imagine very little,” Allende notes in her acknowledgments, and it’s true that her research is evident on every page, some of it harrowing. Almost 15,000 people perished in the French camps, for instance, among them nine out of every 10 children. Throughout, her characters are buffeted by history’s facts, and it’s a testament to her seasoned craft that their story doesn’t sink entirely.

At this point in Allende’s long career, it’s easy to forget what a trailblazer she was, a rare female voice in a wave of Latin American literature that was overwhelmingly male. Vivid vignettes serve as reminders here, among them an opening scene in which Victor brings a smooth-cheeked young soldier back to life by massaging his heart, and another in which he feels his own break. “It was at that moment he understood the profound meaning of that common phrase: he thought he heard the sound of glass breaking and felt that the essence of his being was pouring out until he was empty, with no memory of the past, no awareness of the present, no hope for the future,” Allende writes.

That both scenarios feature the human heart is instructive. Decades later, 80-year-old Victor will come to appreciate that while displacement has shaped his life, it’s the connections he’s made with Roser and others – ties stronger than any national border – that define it.

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Isabel allende on her new book, grandchildren and loss.

When Isabel Allende starts a new book, she always begins writing on Jan. 8. She’s superstitious that way, because it’s an important literary anniversary. On that day in 1981, she wrote a letter to her dying grandfather. The letter blossomed into her first novel, “The House of the Spirits.” It became an international bestseller that won an award for novel of the year in her native Chile.

More than 30 years later, Allende has amassed many more honors and written her 18th book, a contemporary novel titled “Maya’s Notebook.” She appears May 8 at the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul as part of the Talking Volumes author series.

Allende, a young-looking 70, lives with her second husband, lawyer Willie Gordon, in San Rafael, Calif., near San Francisco. Her son Nicolas lives nearby with his family.

Allende’s life reads like that of one of her heroines — perhaps, as theirs are, tinged with a bit of magical realism. She grew up with a box seat to one of the most tumultuous periods of South American history.

She was born in Peru, where her father was Chilean ambassador, into a family with powerful connections. Her father’s cousin Salvador Allende became president of Chile and died under long-debated circumstances during the 1973 coup in that country. Her parents separated when she was 3, and she spent her childhood in Chile, Bolivia and Lebanon after her mother married another diplomat.

Allende married Gordon in 1987 and moved to California. She became a U.S. citizen 16 years later. Her American years have brought some heartbreak amid the joy. Her beloved daughter, Paula, died in 1992 after a medication error left her in a permanent coma, and she and Gordon have since lost two of his children to drug and alcohol addiction, one of them recently.

“Maya’s Notebook” is a departure for Allende, whose novels usually take place in the past. Its title character is a Berkeley teen who, after the death of her beloved grandfather Popo, spirals down into a world of drugs, prostitution and theft, with a girl posse calling themselves the vampires. At 19, on the run from a variety of dangerous pursuers, she retreats to an island off the coast of Chile and writes her story, aided in her recovery by an eccentric group of fellow islanders.

More than any other Allende character to date, Maya represents a modern coming-of-age — abandoned by her mother, given a solid foundation by the grandparents who raised her, she still succumbs to the temptations of a seedy underworld life, fulfilling the worst fears of those who love her before relying on that same foundation to crawl out of the gutter.

Q: Who or what inspired the character of Maya?

A: Maya is like a summary of all my grandchildren. I wrote the book at a time when all of them, three biological and three others through marriage, were in their teens. I saw them exposed to so many dangers — drugs, violence, pornography — things that weren’t all around me when I was growing up. None of them have these kinds of problems, but it’s a sadly common thing for young people to lose their way with drugs and never recover.

Q: You recently lost your adult stepson to an overdose. Has that made it hard to talk about the part drugs play in “Maya’s Notebook”?

A: The timing has been very eerie, very tragic. All three of my stepchildren became addicts, and now two are dead. So much of that journey into hell that can come with drugs and alcohol, the petty theft, the homelessness, I have seen it in my stepchildren.

Q: The relationship between grandparents and grandchildren is an important, recurring theme for you. Why?

A: I grew up in the house of my grandfather, a strong male figure who was strict, severe, no touching or cuddling. But he gave me many life skills, especially discipline. Whenever I feel flaky or lazy or start doubting my capacity, the voice of my grandfather comes into my mind.

Q: You once wrote that your approach to truth is “if it hasn’t happened, it certainly will.” Is that still your philosophy?

A: Yes, and it scares me. When I wrote “Island Beneath the Sea,” about the creation of Haiti as a country, the book came out the same week the earthquake there happened. Sometimes I feel I am provoking these things.

Q: You’ve written 18 books in 30 years, but surely you must have felt unfocused or blocked at some points in such a prolific career.

A: After my daughter Paula died, I wrote a memoir about her, and then felt blocked for three years. I would sit at the computer and nothing would come. Then I remembered my journalist training, and I wrote a nonfiction book as far away from death as possible, about lust and gluttony. Traveling, getting out of my comfort zone, also helps.

Q: Is it true you were once fired for making the heroines of English-language romance novels more independent when you translated them into Spanish?

A: Yes, it was a freelance job. The women were always a little stupid and at the end a man would always have to save them. That’s boring. I tried to make them better, more interesting people.

Q: Do you prefer writing in Spanish or English?

A: Fiction happens in the belly, so I’d rather just let it all out in Spanish. But now that I’ve lived in an English-speaking country for 25 years, I write Spanish like my husband speaks it. I need a dictionary.

Q: Tell us about your husband, Willie Gordon, a San Francisco lawyer who is now also a writer. How did you fall in love?

A: I thought maybe it would be a weeklong affair. He said he liked tall blondes, and the first time he took me to his house the garage floor was covered in dog poop. I was 45, and I fell in love like a teenager. We’re very happy, but circumstances have often been hard.

Q: What makes your relationship work?

A: We really like each other and have important things in common — our politics, neither of us is religious, we both like dogs and the same movies. Our domestic life is comfortable. It’s a dance we are always doing, being together without stepping on each other’s toes.

Q: You have sold more than 57 million books, translated into 27 languages, and won many prestigious awards. Yet some critics, particularly in your homeland, have been harsh about your writing. What’s your theory?

A: If I was a man I probably would have had respect earlier for my work, especially in Latin America. But I think what bothers a lot of people is that my books are bestsellers. That’s wrong; it’s a big underestimation of readers.

Q: So what’s it like being 70?

A: In my case aging doesn’t mean retiring. Getting older is more of an expansion than a contraction for me, a letting go, eliminating the people you don’t like from your life. Getting rid of clutter leaves space for new things.

Q: You sure don’t look 70.

A: I look much better in pictures. You can’t see I’m so short that I’m almost invisible. I can’t wear heels, but now everybody’s wearing platforms and stilettos. I was just at a cocktail party and everyone’s shrimp fell on my head.

Q: You have written that you used to write lies in your journals, that you were an “unbearable arrogant brat.” What did you mean?

A: I was self-centered, creating a reality that suited me, having that feeling that you can change the world with excesses of imagination. When I met my husband I fell in love with a project. Husbands are like countries, I thought, such wonderful material for improvement. That’s arrogance. Before my stepchildren I hadn’t seen addiction up close before. Thinking that it results from a lack of love or discipline? That’s ignorance.

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"Maya's Notebook," by Isabel Allende.

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Isabel Allende is a Chilean-American author whose books are renowned for their magical realist elements and brilliant storytelling. Often considered one of the most widely-read Spanish-language authors, Allende achieved international fame with The House of the Spirits . Her contributions to literature include The City of Beasts , Eva Luna , and Paula , a memoir of her daughter’s death.

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Isabel Allende

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Interview: Isabel Allende

The Chilean novelist was living in exile when her first novel was published in 1985. “In a way, I feel that I am working for my country, even if I don’t live there,” she told us.

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Interview first published May 12, 1985

It was as a letter to her Chilean grandfather, “hateful and much loved,” that Isabel Allende’s first novel, “The House of the Spirits,” began: “He was very machista, but he thought I was a genius, the most beautiful woman alive.”

A niece and goddaughter of Salvador Allende Gossens, the Chilean president who was killed in a coup in 1973, she became a journalist at 17, went on to write four “awful” plays and resisted leaving Chile after the coup because she did not believe a dictatorship could take hold in her country. Now, living in exile in Caracas, Venezuela, she perseveres in her disbelief from a distance. “In a way, I feel that I am working for my country, even if I don’t live there.”

In New York recently for a two-week visit that combined publicity for her novel — a best seller in Europe and Latin America — and teaching at Montclair State College in New Jersey, Miss Allende insisted that she has written “a lucky book, filled with the spirit of my grandmother.” Her concern for the place of women in Latin American society is clearly mirrored in “The House of the Spirits,” but she calls it “a private story,” written for herself and for her children — Paula, 21, and Nicolas, 18. She excepts their father, her husband of 23 years, from the tradition of Latin American male chauvinism “because he was educated in British schools.”

At the outset an unknown on the Latin American literary scene, she had a difficult time launching her first book. “I went to editors there with 500 pages of manuscript, and they said to cut 200 pages because they couldn’t accept more than that from me,” she said. Finally published in Spain, the novel is about “the roots of my mother’s family, the Llona Barros. Just as it is told in the book, Rosa, my grandmother’s sister, died poisoned.” And the patriarch, Esteban Trueba, closely resembles the grandfather with whom she went to live in 1956 when her father, a diplomat posted to Beirut, Lebanon, sent his family home to Chile and safety.

She believes the United States bears responsibility for political problems that have plagued her homeland and Latin America as a whole: “You’ve encouraged governments in Latin America that you yourselves wouldn’t tolerate.” But her visit here has given her another view. “I asked my students at Montclair to name the five qualities they most valued, and 29 out of 34 of them called for honesty.” She smiled in surprise: “What sort of country is this, that people believe in honesty, sincerity, love? We have so little of it in Latin America.” — Leigh Hafrey

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Isabel Allende On Her Latest Book — And Falling In Love At 75

The beloved Chilean-American author of The House of Spirits also explains why she always starts a new book on Jan. 8, and what it will take to finally topple the patriarchy.

By Sadiya Ansari Updated December 19, 2017

Chilean writer, Isabel Allende arrives to present her book 'Mas alla del invierno' in Madrid on June 5, 2017. (Photo by Oscar Gonzalez/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Photo, Oscar Gonzalez/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Isabel Allende is a living literary legend: The Chilean-American author, best known for the breakout success of her 1982 novel,  House of Spirits , has had her prolific collection of work (24 books and counting) translated into 35 languages, and has earned some 60 awards. Plus, she’s a proud feminist, which manifests in her writing and her charitable work — Allende started a foundation in her late daughter’s honour to further reproductive rights for women and fund programs for survivors of abuse. Her latest novel, In the Midst of Winter , follows three lonely characters in Brooklyn brought together by a car accident on a snowy day: a young undocumented nanny originally from Guatemala, a 62-year-old professor from Chile and a 60-year-old American with a painful past life in Brazil.

Allende spoke with Chatelaine about finding new   love at age 75 and how the #MeToo movement might permanently move the needle on sexual misconduct.

The book features the possibility of love in the later stages of life. At the time of writing, you were heartbroken over the end of your marriage. What was it like writing a love story in that circumstance?

I was going through a divorce, my agent died, a few of my best friends died, and my dog died. It was sort of a long, emotional winter. I was trying to remember that there is always an invincible summer waiting to emerge.

That’s why I chose to write about three people who are going through a similar situation of loneliness and sadness. In the process, my life changed. I exorcised my own sorrow and I opened my heart to a new relationship, which is now going so fast — in a couple of weeks, he’s moving into my house.

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Your new partner started writing to you after hearing you on NPR [the U.S.’s National Public Radio], is that right? Tell me a little bit more about how your romance started.

Yes, he started writing me messages every day, saying good morning and goodnight, and sending pictures of his cappuccino or of the full moon. It was just a constant presence. I would get up in the morning and run to the phone. I got used to it. I started depending on it.

For five months of this, we never talked. I had to go to New York to attend a gala [and] we went out for lunch and I said, “Look, what are are your intentions? Because I’m 74, and I don’t have time to waste.” If he had said that to me, I would have run away as fast as possible. That was in October of last year and it’s taken him a year to make the decision to leave everything and come to California.

Do you take a different approach to love at this age?

People ask me, “What is it like to fall in love at 75?” It’s exactly the same as 17, but you don’t have time. So there’s a sense of urgency.

Letter-writing has always been central to your life — you write to your mother every day and House of Spirits started as a letter to your grandfather. What’s so special about the medium for you?

Some people write journals; I can’t do that. I need a reader. My [97-year-old] mother has been there for me to correspond with for decades. I save her letters and at the end of the year I put them in plastic boxes in a storage room. I have decades of boxes, and each box contains between 600 to 800 letters. So you can imagine all my life and all her life is there.

For me, letter-writing gives me the sense that I lived that day. What I don’t write, I will forget, and if I forget it, it’s as if I never lived it.

Evelyn Ortega, one of the main characters in In the Midst of Winter , is a young woman from Guatemala who has escaped a violent past and is cut off from most of her family, working as an undocumented caregiver in Brooklyn. What do you hope to convey about the experience of immigration that doesn’t come across in the news?

In the news, we hear about the plight of immigrants in abstract numbers — we don’t see faces, names or stories. Some of the projects my foundation supports are for refugees and undocumented immigrants. I see cases like Evelyn’s — I didn’t have to make it up, unfortunately.

Also in the book is a theme you’ve written extensively about: sexual violence and its impact on women. In the last few months, we have seen powerful men lose their positions because of sexual misconduct. In the wake of this, do you think the way we talk about sexual violence and sexual harassment is shifting?

It will make a change — not immediately, but in the long run, it will. Many years ago, Anita Hill was the first one to denounce sexual harassment in the workplace, and she lost her case and the guy was elected to the Supreme Court. What she did then, [though it] seemed like a defeat at the moment, changed everything in the workplace in the U.S., and by extension in many other places in the world, because women and men became conscious about something that has always been a problem but that nobody had tackled. Now the same thing has happened, but it’s not just one Anita Hill — thousands are coming forward, and that will change the balance of gender power.

Some people say the solution is more women in power. Do you think that will that change things?

What will topple the patriarchy is a critical number of women in the management of the world. But a critical number. We don’t need smart women that we know by name, we need millions.

You always start writing a new book on Jan. 8. Why?

Before, it was for superstition, and now it’s for discipline. [It’s a way to] carve the time, the silence, and the solitude I need for the book. The people around me — my agent, my editor, my family — know that I’m starting Jan. 8, and I’m not available, so I can really have my time and that is wonderful.

I have never started a book on another date and I have never left a book without finishing it. Sooner or later, even if it takes years, I will finish.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity and length.

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