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How To Write The GED Essay 2023 (Extended Response)

Santiago mallea.

  • Career Planning , Non-Traditional Students , Writing Tips

GED Essay

Chief of Content At Gradehacker

  • Updated on August 2023

How to Write The GED Essay

The best strategy for writing the GED essay is:

  • Read the passages (5 minutes)
  • Analyze the data and create an outline (5 minutes)
  • Write your extended response (30 minutes)
  • Reread and edit your writing (5 minutes)

If you want a clear example of what your GED essay should like like, later in this blog you’ll find a sample.

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If you are planning on taking the GED test , you’ll eventually have to pass the GED essay .

Also known as the extended response, this assignment tests your evidence-based writing skills, and it’s where many students get stuck. However, writing the GED essay is easier than most people make it out to be .

It just takes practice and patience . And with these tips, you’ll be able to ace the test in no time!

Here at Gradehacker, we are the non-traditional adult student’s most trusted resource. Earning a GED diploma is necessary to enroll in college or access better job opportunities. We want you to be capable of writing an entire essay that will clearly show that you are up to the task .

This guide will teach you how to write a GED essay and share the best tips to make your text stand out and meet the passing score.

GED Essay

What Is The GED Essay?

The GED test consists of four sections:

  • Mathematics
  • Social Studies
  • English Language Arts

The Reasoning Through Language Arts exam mainly consists of multiple-choice questions but also includes the Extended Response assignment, where you have to write an essay from scratch from two passages they give you.

You’ll have 45 minutes to analyze these two texts, choose which argument presents strong evidence, and explain why each piece of evidence supports your point.

While this part only represents 20% of your Reasoning Through Language Arts exam score (meaning that you can pass the Language Arts writing test even if you perform poorly in this section), it’s key that you know how to create a well-written GED essay.

Since they are testing your analysis of arguments and writing skills, it’s your opportunity to prove that you have mastered the core elements of the entire Language Arts section.

Plus, if you are planning on pursuing a college degree, where knowing how to analyze texts and write an essay response is important, passing the GED extended response is key.

GED Essay

GED Essay Prompt

To pass the essay portion, you’ll have to read two different passages that talk about the same issue but take an opposite stance about it. Your task is to determine which position presented is better supported.

It doesn’t matter if you disagree with that position; you must defend and explain your decision using multiple pieces of evidence from the texts.

Regarding length, the essay prompt suggests that your response should be approximately four to seven paragraphs of three to seven sentences each , which should be a 300-500 word essay.

While there is no essay length requirement regarding the number of words, we recommend writing between 400 and 500 .

GED Essay Sentence Structure

So, how do you write a GED extended response? Well, It has a structure similar to an argumentative essay.

  • Introductory paragraph:

This should be a primary and short thesis statement where you clearly address which of the two passages is better supported.

  • Body paragraphs: 

Consist of three or four body paragraphs where you formulate your thesis using the text’s information as your source.

  • Conclusion paragraph:

As a final step, briefly summarize your argument and reiterate its importance. If this is not your forte, there are many conclusion tips that can help you!

How to Pass The GED Essay

Now that you understand the GED Extended Response and what you need to do, here is our essay writing guide.

You’ll find multiple tips throughout it, but essentially, to write a cohesive, well-constructed essay, you’ll have to follow this four-part strategy:

  • Read the passages
  • Analyze the data and create an outline
  • Write your extended response essay
  • Reread and edit your writing

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Read the two passages (5 min)

The first step is to read both body passages thoroughly but quickly.

You need to understand what the topic is about, and while you read the text, highlight the statistics and factual data each author uses as support.

Remember that you can have differing views on your chosen side. Recognize which stance has better sources to defend your point, and explain why in your essay.

Analyze the data and create an outline (5 min)

Once you are done reading both texts and already highlighted all the essential information the authors use, you’ll need to analyze the evidence!

While ideally, you should recognize who supports their point better in the previous step , doing it in this part will be easier as you have all the factual data on sig ht.

Usually, the text with more information highlighted will be the one that defends its stance the best . 

So, the next thing you need to do is make an outline and write down your ideas. This way, you’ll have all the information organized to begin the most crucial part of the writing process.

Write your extended response essay (30 min)

And now, with evidence highlighted and an outline created, you are ready to start writing!

If you are going for the minimum and writing a 5-paragraph essay, you’ll need at least three major ideas to develop individually in separate paragraphs.

Stick to one idea per paragraph , and include one or two of your selected pieces of evidence from the texts to organize the information better and keep a good flow.

Remember to use connectors! However, nevertheless, furthermore, additionally, and more! These vital elements will help you introduce the reason for your argument at the beginning of each paragraph.

And just like with any essay, you must use formal and academic language , but remember to be concise and straightforward. It’s the content of what you write that’s important here, so choose your words wisely to show your English language knowledge.

Plus, remember that there’s no specific word count you need to meet.

Our own pro-tip here is to write the introductory paragraph last.

Because many students struggle and waste valuable minutes when trying to begin with the introduction, you can save extra time by explaining and defending your arguments first and writing the intro once you are done.

You’ll see how easy it will be to summarize the main issue and thesis statement once you’ve already developed your points.

Since the GED essay works very similarly to an argumentative paper, there are many more pro-tips you can learn in our guide on how to write an argumentative essay . So be sure to check it out!

Reread and edit your writing (5 min)

Before submitting your essay, you must read what you wrote, check for spelling errors, and ensure that your ideas are clearly understood .

Not editing your essay can be one of your most critical mistakes!

Remember they are testing your understanding of the English language and writing skills; handing in an essay with spelling mistakes, flawed evidence, or poorly structured text can make you lose valuable points.

For this part, it’s crucial you know the most common essay mistakes so you can avoid them!

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GED Essay Sample

Follow all of these tips, and you are guaranteed to pass the GED essay!

However, here you have a   GED Testing Service’s essay example that perfectly explains how this assignment should be completed:

GED Essay

Mastering the GED Essay

Now you know how to write the GED essay!

Remember to follow our essay-writing strategy to pass the Language Arts section by demonstrating mastery of your writing skills.

You are more than capable of completing the GED test with the highest score and then applying to the best colleges to continue your educational journey .

Once you make it happen, don’t forget that if you ever need assistance with your essays or classes , Gradehacker is always here to help!

And if you need more tips on how to improve your writing skills , check out these related blog posts:

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Santiago Mallea

Santiago Mallea is a curious and creative journalist who first helped many college students as a Gradehacker consultant in subjects like literature, communications, ethics, and business. Now, as a Content Creator in our blog, YouTube channel, and TikTok, he assists non-traditional students improve their college experience by sharing the best tips. You can find him on LinkedIn .

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GED Essay-Topics, Samples, And Tips

Last Updated on April 11, 2024.

This language Arts lesson is part of this website’s free online GED classes a nd practice tests, generously provided by the accredited comprehensive GED prep course created by Onsego.

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One part of the GED Reasoning through Language Arts (RLA) test is writing a GED Essay, also known as the Extended Response. You have 45 minutes to create your essay. The GED essay is an argumentative essay.

A common method for writing this type of essay is the five-paragraph approach.

Writing your GED® Essay is not about writing an opinion on the topic at hand. Your opinion is irrelevant. You are asked to determine and explain which of the arguments is better.

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Table of Contents

  • 0.1 Video Transcription
  • 1 GED Essay Structure
  • 2 GED Essay Topics
  • 3 GED Essay Samples
  • 4 Tips for Writing your GED Essay
  • 5 How your GED Essay is Scored

Video Transcription

After reading the stimulus with two different arguments about a subject, your task is to explain why one of these arguments is better.

Remember, when writing your GED® Essay, you are NOT writing your opinion on the topic. That’s irrelevant. You must write about why one argument is better than the other.

You are writing an analysis of the author’s two positions and explaining which argument is stronger. These two arguments are presented in the stimulus, so you don’t need to create any own examples.

So again, you only need to decide what argument is stronger and claim it and prove it. It is NOT about your opinion.

Since in your essay, you need to determine which argument is best supported, your claim should clearly state which of the two positions is stronger.

You will be provided with the stimulus material and a prompt.

The stimulus is a text that provides 2 opposing opinions about a certain subject. The prompt provides instructions and tells you what you need to do.

I’ll say it again because so many students make mistakes here, it’s NOT about your opinion on the topic but the subject that matters!

You need to analyze the arguments and determine which opinion is best supported throughout the text.

You are NOT asked which argument you agree with more, and you should NEVER respond with a personal opinion.

So, don’t use the word “I” such as “I think that…” “I agree because…” “In my opinion…”.

The GED essay is graded on a machine that uses algorithms to figure out your score.

So, no teacher will decide about the score in any way.

It’s very important that you remember this!

Let’s take a look at the structure, topics, and format of the GED Essay.

GED Essay Structure

Ged essay topics.

  • GED Essay Sample
  • GED Essay Scoring
  • GED Essay Writing Tips

Remember: you need to analyze which of the presented arguments is better and explain why it’s better.

Likewise, make sure your reasons come from the text – you aren’t making up your examples; you’re talking about the ones in the passages.

How should you prove that one argument is stronger? – Look at the evidence in the text.

Did the author use a relevant statistic from a reliable source, or did he/she assume something with a hypothetical anecdote?

Once you know which is better supported, you’re on your way.

Keep in mind: Don’t Summarize!

It’s easy to substitute a simpler task (summarize each side) for the more complex task of evaluating arguments. But if all you do is summarize, your response will be considered off-topic and likely will not receive any points.

The GED Essay should contain:

  • 4-7 paragraphs of 3 to 7 sentences each and 300-500 words in total.
  • An essay (or response) that is significantly shorter could put you in danger of scoring a 0 just for not showing enough of your writing skills.
  • As you read the stimulus material (text), think carefully about the argumentation presented in the passage(s). “Argumentation” refers to the assumptions, claims, support, reasoning, and credibility on which a position is based.
  • Pay close attention to how the author(s) use these strategies to convey his or her position.

Every well-written GED essay has an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

Your response will be an argument or an argumentative essay. Remember that you are NOT writing your opinion on the topic.

You are writing an analysis of two of the author’s positions and explaining which argument is stronger.

Things to keep in mind: the Extended Response (GED Essay) is scored by smart machines that are programmed to recognize correct answers. So, don’t try to be creative; just be correct. Also:

  • Use proper grammar and sentence structure.
  • Practice writing a 300 to 500-word essay.

Let’s look at the GED Essay structure: an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

  • The Introduction introduces the topic you are writing about and states your claim or thesis statement. Stand your position.
  • The Body of the essay presents reasoning and evidence to support your claim. This is the longest part of the response and should be at least two paragraphs.
  • The concluding paragraph sums up your main points and restates your claim.

Here are a few examples of GED Essay Topics. Click on the title to read a full stimulus and a prompt.

An Analysis of Daylight-Saving Time

The article presents arguments from both supporters and critics of Daylight-Saving Time who disagree about the practice’s impact on energy consumption and safety. Check here to read the full article.

Should the Penny Stay in Circulation?

Analyze the presented arguments and decide which one is better supported. Check here to read the full article.

Is Golf a Sport?

Proponents say that golf meets the definition of “sport.” Opponents say that golf better meets the definition of “game” than “sport. Analyze both opinions and determine which one is better supported. Check here to read the full article.

GED Essay Samples

Click here to access a sample of a GED essay with an explanation of the structure. Getting familiar with GED essay samples will help you plan your essay and understand what elements are important.

When reading the essay subject, you really should take the time to pull together your thoughts. By arranging your ideas rationally, you will be able to express your thoughts far better on paper. When you start writing, concentrate on the guidelines that you came to understand in English class.

Pay attention to English language usage (grammar); you must use the right punctuation and capitalization and decide on suitable word solutions.

Check here to read a GED Essay Sample with our comments.

Tips for Writing your GED Essay

1. Make sure you read the stimulus and prompt cautiously

It’s good to practice this carefully. Check out each question carefully and take a little time to figure out the topic and what kind of answer will be expected.

It is important to read the questions meticulously.

Usually, students simply run over stimulus and prompt and begin to write immediately, believing that they will save time this way.

Well, this actually the most undesirable thing to do. Take a short while and try to understand the questions completely in order to respond to them appropriately. If you wish, highlight the essential words and phrases in the stimulus to be able to look at it from time to time to be certain you stick to the topic.

2. Sketch an outline for the essay

In general, you will only need a few minutes to plan your essay, and it is imperative to take that time. As soon as you grasp the questions entirely, and once you have scribbled down some initial ideas, make an outline of the essay and follow that.

Plan an introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this process is going to save you a lot of time and it helps establish a rational development of thoughts.

3. Stick to the subject

Each paragraph in the body of your response should explain why a piece of evidence supports your claim or disputes the opposing claim to explain your evidence.

You can describe or restate it. This shows that you understand precisely what it means and how it relates to your claim.

Cite the mentioned details or facts of a specific point and relate them to your claim.

Your response should include evidence from both passages and explain what strong evidence supports one argument and why faulty evidence weakens the other argument.

4. Proofreading and Revision

By the time you completed writing your essay, you should go back to the beginning and read your essay carefully again, as you quite easily could have forgotten a comma or have misspelled a word while writing your essay. See also this post ->  Is the GED Language Arts Test Hard?

While rereading your essay, pay close attention to whether your essay provides well-targeted points, is organized clearly, presents specific information and facts, comes with proper sentence construction, and has no grammar or spelling mistakes.

How your GED Essay is Scored

Your GED essay is scored by smart machines that are programmed to recognize correct answers. So don’t try to be creative; just be correct.

They will be using five criteria to assess your essay.

  • Organization: were you clear about the essential idea, and did you present a well-thought strategy for composing your essay?
  • Clear and swift response: did you deal with the subject adequately, without shifting from one focal point to another?
  • Progress and details: did you apply relevant examples and specific details to elaborate on your original concepts or arguments, as opposed to using lists or repeating identical information?
  • Grammar Rules of English: did you use decent writing techniques like sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, syntax, and grammar, and did you shape and edit your essay after you penned the first draft?
  • Word choice: how far did you choose and employ suitable words to indicate your points of view?

Your 45 minutes will go quickly, so focus on these important points to get the best score.

What’s important is to make a clear statement about which position is better supported. Write clear sentences and arrange paragraphs in a logical order.

GED testing includes four modules (independent subtests) in Mathematical Reasoning (Math), Reasoning through Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies that can be taken separately. You should study very well, be effective on test day, and pass the subtest(s) you registered for.

GED writing for essays may be a bit tricky, but you can store all this information for proper learning on a list and change to proper write essay techniques before test day has arrived. Just practice a lot, and you’ll see that it’ll be getting better and better. So now you know all about writing the GED Essay.

How to Write & Pass a GED Essay

By: Jen Denton, Student Success Coach on January 3, 2023 at 3:21 AM

Featured Image

The GED essay intimidates a lot of people. Writing a whole essay from scratch in 45 minutes or less can be tough, but it doesn't have to be. This GED essay writing guide will help you know what to expect and how to pass the written portion of the test. Learn all about the GED extended response with examples, tips, and a breakdown of everything you'll be graded on.

Table of Contents

What is the ged essay, example ged essay questions, example ged essay, ged essay practice, ged essay structure, how is the ged essay scored, 8 tips to help you pass the ged essay.

The GED test is made up of four subjects: mathematical reasoning, social studies, science, and reasoning through language arts (RLA). The RLA subject test includes two parts, one of which is the GED extended response, sometimes called the GED essay. You will have 45 minutes to complete the essay to the best of your ability. If you don’t finish in time, don’t worry! The essay is only worth 20% of your final RLA score, so you can still pass the test even if you don’t get a high score on the essay.

The extended response can be on a variety of topics, but it will always follow the same format. You will be given two different articles on the same topic, usually argumentative essays with a firm position. You will be asked to evaluate the two arguments and write your own argumentative essay determining which article presented the strongest position. The essay should be 3-5 paragraphs long, with each paragraph between 3-7 sentences.

All GED essay questions will ask you to read and evaluate two passages that take different stances on the same topic. Essays should determine which passage presents a stronger argument and back up that claim with analysis of evidence from the passages.

Here is an example GED essay question:

Analyze the arguments presented in the press release and the letter to the editor. In your response, develop an argument in which you explain how one position is better supported than the other. Incorporate relevant and specific evidence from both sources to support your argument.

Remember, the better-argued position is not necessarily the position with which you agree. This task should take approximately 45 minutes to complete. 1

1  "Extended Response Scoring - GED." https://ged.com/wp-content/uploads/extended_response_scoring.pdf . Accessed 25 Feb. 2021.

The following is an example high scoring essay:

Both the press release and the letter to the editor offer positions that are supported by both fact and opinion. The press release seeks to exhort the new bill for expansion of Highway 17, while the letter argues that the passing of the bill could prove detrimental to the district. While both sides make an acceptable case, the latter provides a stronger argument.

One example of the letter’s stronger argument is the explanation that federal tax dollars pay for the road, as it will incorporate six different states, therefore eliminating this particular state’s ability to strike the bill down. This proves, with factual information, that the district did not have a fair say in the bill. The notion that few residents will use the road that their tax dollars are providing is an opinion. However, a resident and small-business owner in the town is more credible in the awareness of the town’s concern, as compared to a representative who attended a few meetings in the town hall.

Another example of the better supported argument in the letter is the reference to the construction jobs as temporary. The press release praises the new jobs created by the highway construction, as this is a valid point. However, the author of the letter is correct in the fact that the jobs will not create a boom in the district’s economy, or fill in the gap caused by the closures in the manufacturing plants, as the press release leads listeners to believe. The road construction does not solve the long-term issue of unemployment in the town. In addition, the author of the letter counters the argument that new motels, restaurants, and gas stations along the highway will create permanent jobs for the residents of the town. She explains that, “…only minimum wage jobs will remain.” This is a valid argument also, as unemployed residents that need enough income to support a household would not be much better off. Providing restaurant or motel jobs is very unlikely to feed or support an entire family. It will not pick up the laid-off employees of the manufacturing plants, who may have worked for many years towards promotions and a pension.

Another example of the letter’s stronger argument is the author’s explanation of the 2001 study. She concedes that the representative is correct in citing that bypasses are proven to reduce noise and traffic in town, but she argues that the study shows a negative effect on local businesses. This piece of the study was not mentioned by Representative Walls or the press release, and it is a proven fact. This draws more credibility to the argument in the letter. Also, although it is a speculation, it is more reasonable that traveler’s will stick to the main highway and not venture miles off their path into small town when chain gas stations, restaurants, and motels are conveniently located directly at the highway exits. It is less likely that old roads in the towns will become historical locations, attracting tourists and boosting small business sales.

Despite the argument and evidence given by the press release, it appears that the letter to the editor offers a stronger case. The author’s ideas are backed up by logical explanations and facts with a few speculations. Though the press release offers some fact, it is mainly specked with anticipations and hopes, driven to overshadow any doubts and quell any concerns. The letter is penned by a resident of the town and owner of a business, subject to firsthand opinions of the citizens of the district. The press release is pushed by an elected representative who, upon visiting the town a number of times and consulting a small percentage of the constituents, is convinced she understands the majority. Although both parties may very well have the best interests of the district in mind, and either position could be correct, it is clear that the letter provides a better-supported argument. 2

2  "Extended Response Scoring - GED." https://ged.com/wp-content/uploads/extended_response_scoring.pdf . Accessed 25 Feb. 2021.

For GED essay practice, try writing your own essay based on the example above. Set a timer for 45 minutes and do your best to write an essay with your own analysis and ideas.

You can practice more writing skills with this free test or enroll today in the GED Academy to get access to more GED essay prompts and personalized feedback from GED Essay graders.

The structure for the GED essay can take a few different forms, depending on how you decide to organize your ideas. No matter what, it should include an introduction paragraph, 1-3 body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. To receive a passing score, your essay must present a clear topic supported by details from both passages. Include your main idea in an introductory paragraph. In middle paragraphs, make connections between your details and your main idea. Your conclusion should also fit logically with the details.

The introduction should demonstrate your understanding of the overall topic based on the passages you read and a claim. The claim is a statement of your argument. It doesn’t need to go into detail, but should state your essay’s position on the questions presented.

The body paragraphs will go into more detail. They will include a combination of summary, analysis, and evidence to back up your claim. Be sure to include analysis of both passages.

The conclusion should explain the result of your findings and reinforce your original claim.

You can earn up to six points on the GED extended response. There are three main categories your essay is graded on, and you can earn up to two points for each.

Creation of arguments and use of evidence: Craft a strong claim and use analysis of the arguments and evidence from the passages to support it.

Development of ideas and organizational structure: Write a substantial essay with clear transitions between ideas, including a strong introduction and conclusion.

Clarity and command of standard English conventions: Use appropriate language and demonstrate strong language and grammar skills.

The extended response accounts for 20% of the total RLA score.

  • Read all the instructions. The most common reason people score low on the essay is because they misunderstand the prompt.
  • Make an outline. After reading the passages and the prompt, write down your ideas and organize them during your pre-writing.
  • Make a list of evidence. When you read the passages, take notes on the important details you want to remember later, so you don’t have to spend time searching for it later.
  • Write your introduction last. A lot of people get tripped up by how to start the essay. If that’s you, just skip this step and go back to it once you’ve written the rest of the essay.
  • Write first, edit later. You only have 45 minutes, so use your time wisely. Write your first draft of the essay before you start fine-tuning and editing it. Save that for your remaining time so you don’t turn in a half-written essay.
  • Use formal language. Avoid “I” statements like, “I think” or casual language like slang.
  • Don’t check the clock. Time always seems to go faster when you need it to go slow. Every time you look at the clock, that’s breaking your focus on your essay.
  • Practice! The only way to get better at writing essays is to write more essays. Practice using the GED Writing Practice Test , and remember to time yourself!

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396 GED Essay Topics, Prompts, & Good Ideas

18 January 2024

last updated

General Educational Development (GED) essay topics span a broad range of themes intended to test one’s comprehension, analytical abilities, and proficiency in written communication. These subjects often delve into prominent social issues, such as climate change, poverty, and racial discrimination, demanding an insightful exploration of these themes. Furthermore, personal development topics prompt candidates to introspect, examine crucial life choices, or demonstrate resilience amidst challenging circumstances. Discussions on societal systems also form a critical part of GED essay topics, urging candidates to scrutinize structures, like the justice system, education policies, and healthcare facilities. In turn, evaluative tasks pertaining to historical events, literary analysis, or data interpretation are needed to be explored. The objective is not only to state one’s thoughts but also to present them in a clear, coherent, and persuasive manner, substantiating them with appropriate examples, personal anecdotes, or statistical data. The ultimate goal of these GED essay topics is to enhance a candidate’s critical thinking and communication skills, fostering competencies for future endeavors.

Best GED Essay Topics

  • Social Media’s Influence on Global Culture
  • Renewable Energy: Benefits and Drawbacks
  • Universal Healthcare from a Global Perspective
  • Cybersecurity Threats in the Digital Age
  • Impacts of Technology on Mental Health
  • Climate Change: Mitigation Strategies and Challenges
  • Artificial Intelligence and Future Job Markets
  • Privacy Concerns in Today’s Internet Society
  • Urban Development Implications of Public Transportation
  • Vegetarianism: Health and Environmental Effects
  • Drone Technology: Practical and Ethical Aspects
  • Animal Rights: Welfare, Conservation, and Ethics
  • Nuclear Energy: Risk vs. Reward
  • Exploring Identity and Integration Through Multiculturalism
  • Digital Currency: Economic Impacts and Predictions
  • The Automation Revolution: Industrial Progress or Peril
  • Wilderness Preservation vs. Resource Extraction
  • Feasibility of Interplanetary Colonization: Space Travel
  • Holistic Education: Necessity in the 21st Century
  • Pros and Cons of Mandatory Military Service
  • A Pandemic Legacy: Online Learning

GED Essay Topics, Prompts, & Good Ideas

Easy GED Essay Topics

  • Societal Impacts and Solutions for Aging Populations
  • Volunteering: Personal Growth and Societal Benefits
  • Child Labor: Ethical Implications and Remedies
  • Art Therapy: Healing Power or Placebo
  • Strains on Resources and Solutions: Overpopulation
  • Cyber Bullying: An Invisible Threat
  • Veganism: Ethics, Health, and Environment
  • Internet Censorship: Freedom vs. Security
  • Minimalism: A Solution to Consumerism
  • Polar Ice Melt: Consequences and Countermeasures
  • Electric Cars: A Green Future
  • Genetic Testing: Pros, Cons, and Ethical Dilemmas
  • Capital Punishment: A Justified Deterrent
  • Telemedicine: A New Era in Healthcare
  • Microplastic Pollution: An Underestimated Threat
  • Cryptocurrency: Disruptor or Flash in the Pan
  • Fast Fashion: Consumerism’s Environmental Cost
  • Vaccinations: Public Health Triumph or Controversy
  • Citizen Journalism: Democratic Tool or Danger
  • Vertical Farming: Feeding Tomorrow’s Cities
  • Antimicrobial Resistance: An Emerging Health Crisis
  • Homeschooling: Educational Freedom or Isolation
  • Space Junk: Consequences and Clean-Up

Interesting GED Essay Topics

  • Parenting Styles: Impact on Child Development
  • Gig Economy: Boon or Bane for Workers
  • Urbanization’s Effect on Biodiversity
  • Dark Tourism: Morbid Fascination or Educational Experience
  • Nanotechnology: Pioneering the Microcosm
  • Modern Slavery: An Unseen Epidemic
  • Smart Cities: Revolutionizing Urban Living
  • Forest Fires: Climate Change Amplifier
  • Traditional Medicine vs. Modern Healthcare
  • Aquaculture: Solution to Overfishing
  • Body Image Issues in Media Representation
  • E-Sports: The Evolution of Competition
  • Augmented Reality: Impacts on Society
  • Remote Work: A Blessing or a Curse
  • Hyperloop: Revolutionizing Transportation
  • Mental Illness Stigma: Society’s Silent Struggle
  • Mandatory Voting: Democracy Boost or Rights Violation
  • Eco-Tourism: Environmentally Friendly or Exploitative
  • Solitude in the Age of Connectivity
  • Fake News: Information Integrity in Digital Media
  • Internet of Things: Opportunities and Risks
  • Bioprinting: The Future of Medicine

History GED Essay Topics for High School

  • Impacts and Implications of the American Revolution on World Politics
  • The Cold War Era: An Analysis of Its Effects on Global Relations
  • Civil Rights Movement: A Study on Martin Luther King Jr’s Influence
  • The Industrial Revolution and Its Role in Shaping the Modern World
  • World War II: Homefront Experiences and Their Historical Significance
  • Napoleon Bonaparte: An Examination of His Role in European History
  • Ancient Rome: Its Contributions to Law and Governance
  • The Holocaust: A Deep Dive Into Its Global Consequences
  • The Gutenberg Press: The Catalyst for the Renaissance and Reformation
  • Aztec Empire: Understanding Its Rise and Fall
  • Prohibition Era: Its Long-Term Effects on American Society and Economy
  • The Role of Feudalism in Shaping Medieval Europe’s Socioeconomic Landscape
  • Chinese Cultural Revolution: A Study on Its Sociopolitical Effects
  • The Spanish Inquisition: Its Impact on Religious Freedom and Persecution
  • British Colonial Rule in India: Unraveling Its Long-Term Impacts
  • African Kingdoms: Unearthing Their Role in the Transatlantic Slave Trade
  • Transcontinental Railroad: Its Role in Shaping American Expansion
  • Byzantine Empire: Its Influence on Christian Orthodoxy
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis: A Pivotal Point in Cold War History
  • Agricultural Revolution: How Did It Transform Early Human Societies?
  • The Persian Empire: Its Role in the Formation of the Middle East
  • Viking Invasions: Their Impact on European History and Culture

History GED Essay Topics for College Students

  • The French Revolution: A Study of Its Impact on Modern Democracy
  • The Crusades: Their Effects on Christian-Muslim Relations
  • Renaissance: Its Impact on European Art and Culture
  • The Reign of Terror: Unearthing Its Historical Legacy in French History
  • The Trail of Tears: Unmasking the Human Rights Violations
  • The Ottoman Empire: Exploring the Reasons Behind Its Collapse
  • Manhattan Project: How Did It Usher in the Nuclear Age?
  • The Russian Revolution: Its Role in the Formation of the Soviet Union
  • The Arab Spring: How It Reshaped Modern Middle Eastern Politics
  • The Boer War: Its Effects on South Africa
  • The Zulu Kingdom: Its Impact on Southern African History
  • Ancient Greek Philosophy: Its Influence on Western Thought
  • The East India Company: Its Role in Global Trade Dynamics
  • The Meiji Restoration: Its Influence on Japan’s Modernization
  • European Imperialism: Its Effects on Native Populations in the Americas
  • The Black Death: Its Impact on Medieval Europe
  • The Space Race: How Did It Shape Technological Advancements?
  • The Armenian Genocide: A Detailed Examination of Its Historical Ramifications
  • The Great Depression: An Investigation of Its Effects on American Family Dynamics
  • Disappearance of the Mayan Civilization: A Historical Mystery
  • Women’s Suffrage Movement: Its Impact on Present-Day Gender Equity

GED Essay Prompts

  • Impacts of Social Media on Teenage Relationships
  • Influence of Celebrity Culture on Teenage Fashion Choices
  • Risks and Benefits of Online Learning for Adolescents
  • Consequences of Teenage Smoking and Vaping
  • Cyberbullying’s Effects on Teen Mental Health
  • Roles of Extracurricular Activities in School Life
  • Importance of Financial Education in High School
  • Effects of Climate Change on Future Generations
  • Childhood Obesity and Public Health Strategies
  • Technology’s Influence on Modern Adolescent Communication
  • Balancing Academics and Sports in High School
  • Influence of Music Genres on Teenage Behavior
  • Pros and Cons of Teenage Entrepreneurship
  • Emphasizing Mental Health in School Curriculums
  • Roles of Books in Enhancing Creativity among Teenagers
  • Necessity of Healthy Eating Habits in Adolescents
  • Rising Popularity of E-Sports among Teenagers
  • Responsibilities and Rights of Teen Workers
  • Strategies for Reducing Teenage Pregnancy Rates
  • Promoting Environmental Awareness in High School Students

GED Language Arts Essay Topics

  • Exploring the Impact of Literature on Society
  • Analysis of Technology’s Role in Modern Writing
  • Evolution of Poetry throughout History
  • Influence of Media on Language and Communication
  • Importance of Critical Thinking in Analyzing Literary Works
  • Power of Persuasion in Advertising and Marketing
  • Effectiveness of Creative Writing in Expressing Emotions
  • Elements of a Successful Short Story
  • Cultural Significance of Folktales and Legends
  • Symbolism in Poetry and Prose
  • Role of Ethics in Journalism and Reporting
  • Impact of Social Media on Language and Writing Style
  • Connections Between Language and Identity
  • Influence of Historical Events on Literature
  • Women Writers in Shaping Literature
  • Themes of Love and Loss in Shakespearean Sonnets
  • Evolution of the English Language over Time
  • Benefits of Bilingualism in Language Acquisition
  • Use of Satire in Political Cartoons and Literature
  • Relationship Between Music and Poetry
  • Roles of Literary Devices in Creating Memorable Prose

Social Study GED Essay Topics

  • Industrialization’s Impacts on Urbanization in the 19th Century
  • Exploring Causes and Consequences of the Great Depression
  • Analyzing the Effects of Colonialism on Indigenous Cultures
  • Investigating Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece
  • The Impact of Globalization on Cultural Diversity
  • Assessing Factors that Led to the American Revolution
  • Examining the Role of Religion in Shaping Societies
  • Exploring Consequences of the Cold War
  • Analyzing the Impact of Immigration on Economic Growth
  • Causes and Consequences of World War I
  • Investigating the Role of Education in Social Mobility
  • Analyzing the Role of Media in Shaping Public Opinion
  • The Impact of the Industrial Revolution on Labor Conditions
  • Assessing the Significance of the Women’s Suffrage Movement
  • Effects of Colonialism on African Economies
  • Investigating the Origins and Spread of Buddhism
  • The Role of Technology in Social and Political Movements
  • Analyzing the Impact of the Vietnam War on American Society
  • Influence of Political Ideologies on Government Policies
  • Exploring Origins and Spread of Human Rights
  • Assessing Consequences of European Imperialism in Africa

GED Essay Topics for Adults

  • Benefits and Drawbacks of Online Education
  • Influence of Social Media on Personal Relationships
  • Roles of Exercise in Boosting Mental Health
  • Impacts of Climate Change on Global Economies
  • Importance of Renewable Energy Sources for Sustainable Future
  • Privacy Concerns in the Age of Information Technology
  • Vegetarianism Versus Meat-Eating: A Nutritional Comparison
  • Implications of Artificial Intelligence on the Workforce
  • Necessity of Financial Education in Modern Curriculum
  • Impacts of Immigration Policies on National Identity
  • Influence of Video Games on Adolescent Behavior
  • Effectiveness of Gun Control Measures in Reducing Crime
  • Internet’s Role in Promoting Entrepreneurship
  • Veganism as a Response to Animal Cruelty
  • Cybersecurity Threats in the Era of Digitalization
  • Women’s Rights Movements: The Journey So Far
  • Child Labor Laws: Effectiveness and Drawbacks
  • Potential of Space Travel for Future Generations
  • Roles of Unions in Protecting Workers’ Rights
  • Impacts of Genetic Engineering on Medicine

GED Essay Topics for Teenagers

  • Effective Study Techniques for High School Students
  • Fitness and Its Effects on Teenage Wellness
  • Multilingualism and Cognitive Development in Adolescents
  • Parenting Styles’ Effects on Adolescent Behavior
  • Influence of the Fashion Industry on Teenage Body Image
  • Roles of Art Therapy in Managing Teen Stress
  • Social Networking Sites and Teenage Privacy
  • Challenges Faced by Immigrant Teenagers in Schools
  • Encouraging Adolescents Toward Sustainable Living
  • Volunteerism and its Role in Teenage Development
  • Impacts of Peer Pressure on Teenage Decisions
  • Cybersecurity Education for Adolescents
  • Childhood Trauma and Its Impact on Adolescent Development
  • Exploring Adolescent Perceptions of Body Art
  • Influence of Reality TV on Teenage Aspirations
  • Strategies for Building Emotional Intelligence in Teens
  • Roles of School Counseling in Teenage Career Choices
  • Animal Rights and Teenage Activism
  • Value of Internships for High School Students
  • Effects of Divorce on Teenage Mental Health
  • Importance of Astronomy Education in High School

GED Essay Topics on Current Events

  • Income Inequality: Bridging the Wealth Gap
  • Cybersecurity: Protecting Online Privacy and Data
  • Gender Equality: Empowering Women in the Modern World
  • Mental Health Awareness: Destigmatizing Psychological Well-Being
  • Space Exploration: Pushing the Boundaries of Science
  • Education Reform: Enhancing Learning in the 21st Century
  • Global Migration: Managing the Challenges of Displacement
  • Biotechnology Advancements: Shaping the Future of Medicine
  • Gun Control: Finding a Balance Between Safety and Rights
  • Racial Justice: Promoting Equality and Ending Discrimination
  • Sustainable Agriculture: Building a Resilient Food System
  • Nuclear Power: Evaluating Its Role in a Clean Energy Future
  • Automation and Job Displacement: Preparing for the Future of Work
  • Refugee Crisis: Providing Support and Integration Strategies
  • Genetic Engineering: Exploring the Ethical Implications
  • Universal Basic Income: Redefining Social Welfare Systems
  • Blockchain Technology: Revolutionizing Industries and Security
  • Indigenous Rights: Preserving Cultural Heritage and Land Rights
  • Food Waste Reduction: Tackling the Issue of Hunger and Sustainability
  • Immigration Policies: Balancing National Security and Compassion

Education GED Essay Topics

  • The Significance of Critical Thinking Skills in Education
  • Advancing STEM Education for Future Innovators
  • Promoting Cultural Diversity Within School Curriculum
  • Addressing Educational Disparities and the Achievement Gap
  • Integrating Technology for Enhanced Learning
  • Effective Strategies for Classroom Management
  • Benefits of Early Childhood Education
  • Examining the Impact of Homeschooling on Student Development
  • Cultivating Creativity and Imagination in Education
  • Evaluating the Pros and Cons of Standardized Testing
  • The Influence of Social Media on Educational Practices
  • Engaging Parents in Education for Student Success
  • Implementing Character Development in Schools
  • Overcoming Obstacles in Special Education
  • The Importance of Financial Literacy in Schooling
  • Exploring the Role of Arts Education in Holistic Growth
  • Strategies to Combat Bullying and Foster Safe School Environments
  • Assessing the Impact of School Funding on Academic Quality
  • Promoting Healthy Lifestyles through Physical Education
  • Integrating Environmental Awareness in the Curriculum
  • Exploring Alternative Educational Approaches and Their Efficacy

GED Essay Topics on Environment

  • The Importance of Wetland Conservation
  • The Significance of Recycling in Waste Management
  • Conservation of Endangered Species: Preserving Earth’s Diversity
  • The Role of Technology in Environmental Sustainability
  • The Relationship Between Urbanization and Environmental Challenges
  • Water Scarcity: Necessity for Conservation Strategies
  • The Impact of Industrialization on Air Quality
  • Sustainable Transportation: Reducing Carbon Footprints
  • The Importance of Oceans in Maintaining Ecosystem Balance
  • Ecosystem Restoration: Healing the Planet
  • The Role of Government Policies in Environmental Protection
  • Impacts of Overfishing on Marine Ecosystems
  • Waste Reduction: Minimizing Environmental Footprints
  • The Significance of Environmental Justice in Communities
  • Transitioning to Renewable Energy: Advantages and Challenges
  • Forests’ Roles in Carbon Sequestration
  • Consequences of Soil Erosion on Agricultural Productivity
  • Importance of Wildlife Conservation for Eco-Tourism
  • Benefits of Sustainable Building Practices
  • Relationship Between Consumerism and Environmental Degradation

GED Essay Topics on Health

  • Enhancing Healthcare Accessibility in Underserved Regions
  • Innovative Approaches to Tackle Childhood Obesity
  • Encouraging Healthy Aging Practices for Longevity
  • Social Media’s Influence on Body Image and Mental Health
  • Bridging Health Disparities Among Socioeconomic Groups
  • Promoting the Benefits of Meditation for Stress Relief
  • Fostering Mental Health Awareness in Educational Institutions
  • Preventing Osteoporosis through Regular Exercise
  • Managing and Preventing Chronic Pain Effectively
  • Environmental Factors’ Significance in Human Health
  • Strengthening Disease Prevention Education for Public Health
  • Cognitive Function Enhancement through Regular Physical Activity
  • Integrating Alternative Medicine Into Mainstream Healthcare
  • Combating the Opioid Crisis: Prevention and Treatment Strategies
  • Early Detection and Treatment of Chronic Illnesses
  • Workplace Wellness Programs: Promoting Employee Health
  • Nurturing Healthy Eating Habits in Educational Settings
  • Genetic Factors in Disease Prevention and Treatment
  • Dual Impacts of Substance Abuse on Physical and Mental Health
  • Promoting Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health Education
  • Respiratory Health Challenges Caused by Air Pollution

Technology GED Essay Topics

  • Exploring Ethical Considerations in Genetic Engineering
  • Technology’s Roles in Environmental Conservation
  • Empowering Individuals With Assistive Innovations
  • Advancements in Renewable Energy Solutions
  • Social Media’s Influence on Contemporary Society
  • Safeguarding Sensitive Information: The Importance of Cybersecurity
  • The Evolution of Mobile Devices and Communication Channels
  • The Future of Immersive Experiences: Virtual Reality
  • Streamlining Workflows: Automating Processes with Technology
  • Drones: Revolutionizing Various Sectors
  • Biometric Authentication Systems: Pros and Cons
  • Blockchain Technology: Transforming Various Spheres
  • Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: Advancements in Patient Care
  • Digitalization’s Effects on Traditional Media Platforms
  • Green Technology: Sustainable Solutions for the Future
  • The Influence of Gaming on Cognitive Abilities and Development
  • Cryptocurrencies: Reshaping the Financial Landscape
  • Smart Technologies in Transportation Systems
  • Robotics in Industrial Automation: Enhancing Efficiency
  • Ethical Considerations of Autonomous Vehicles in Society

History GED Essay Topics

  • Colonial Influences on Modern-Day American Society: An Exploration
  • Reconstruction Policies Post-Civil War: A Comparative Analysis
  • American Civil Rights Movement: Its Influence on Global Human Rights Activism
  • Collapse of the Roman Empire: Impact on Modern Architecture
  • Influence of Ottoman Architecture on Modern Design Principles
  • Mughal Rule in India: Legacy in Art, Culture, and Administration
  • Impacts of the Bubonic Plague on 14th-Century Europe
  • Significance of the Gold Rush in California’s Development
  • Roles of Spartan Society in Ancient Greek Military Dominance
  • Social Consequences of the Age of Exploration in the Americas
  • Significance of the Battle of Hastings in English History
  • Historical Analysis of the Suez Crisis and Global Power Dynamics
  • Fall of the Soviet Union: Ramifications on Contemporary Politics
  • Understanding the Political Landscape of Post-Apartheid South Africa
  • Causes and Consequences of the Teapot Dome Scandal in the US
  • Cultural Shifts Prompted by the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s
  • Development of Democracy in Athens: Influences on Modern Political Systems
  • Impacts of the Khmer Rouge Regime on Cambodia
  • Consequences of the Thirty Years’ War on European State Formation
  • Exploration of the Ming Dynasty’s Influence on Chinese Culture
  • Influence of the Civilian Conservation Corps on the American Environment

GED Math Essay Topics

  • The Pros and Cons of Calculators in Mathematics Education
  • Mathematics in Cryptography and Data Security
  • Graph Theory’s Impacts on Network Connectivity
  • Mathematics and Art: Symmetry and Fractals
  • Contributions of Mathematics to Economics
  • The Significance of Mathematical Reasoning in Problem-Solving
  • Geometry in Architectural Design and Construction
  • Game Theory in Strategic Decision-Making
  • Mathematics and Music Theory Connection
  • Calculus and Physics: Analyzing Motion
  • Linear Algebra in Computer Graphics and Animation
  • Discrete Mathematics in Computer Science Applications
  • Statistical Analysis in Medical Research and Clinical Trials
  • Mathematical Patterns in Nature
  • Ethics in Data Collection and Analysis for Big Data
  • Mathematical Principles in Machine Learning Algorithms
  • Number Theory’s Applications in Cryptography
  • Game Theory in Economics and Business Strategy
  • Chaos Theory and Complex Systems
  • Mathematics and Genetics: Population Studies

GED Science Essay Topics

  • Investigating Nanotechnology’s Benefits and Risks
  • Examining Human DNA’s Evolutionary Significance
  • Understanding Photosynthesis Mechanics in Plants
  • The Influence of Technology on Human Health and Well-Being
  • Unraveling Dark Matter’s Mysteries in the Universe
  • Ethical Implications of Human Cloning and Stem Cell Research
  • Evaluating Antibiotic Resistance’s Impact on Public Health
  • Climate Change’s Effects on Biodiversity and Ecosystems
  • Analyzing the Relationship Between Genetics and Behavior
  • Investigating Space Exploration’s Potential for Human Civilization
  • Vaccines’ Roles in Controlling Infectious Diseases
  • Understanding Quantum Mechanics’ Physics
  • Prospects of Colonizing Other Planets Within the Solar System
  • Analyzing the Causes and Consequences of Ocean Acidification
  • Exploring Artificial Intelligence’s Effects on Job Automation
  • Analyzing Ocean Pollution’s Impacts on Marine Life
  • Explaining Evolution and Natural Selection Mechanisms
  • Robotics’ Roles in Revolutionizing Manufacturing Industries
  • Investigating Gene Therapy’s Potential for Treating Genetic Disorders
  • Addressing the Link Between Mental Health and Neurobiology

Essay Topics on Nursing for GED Test

  • Exploring the Role of Nurses in Pain Management
  • Critical Analysis of Ethical Dilemmas in Nursing
  • Holistic Approach to Care: Impact on Patient Outcomes
  • Understanding the Importance of Communication in Nursing
  • Patient Advocacy: Essential Aspect of Nursing Practice
  • Advancements in Technology: Implications for Modern Nursing
  • Nurse Burnout: Causes, Consequences, and Prevention Strategies
  • Pediatric Nursing: Specific Challenges and Opportunities
  • Reflection on Leadership Styles in Nursing Management
  • Geriatric Care: Nursing Strategies for Older Adults
  • Nursing and Mental Health: The Invisible Battle
  • Dissecting the Influence of Nurses in Health Promotion
  • Palliative Care Nursing: Dealing with End of Life
  • Cultural Sensitivity in Nursing: Its Relevance and Impact
  • Legal Issues and Responsibilities in Nursing Profession
  • Implications of Chronic Illness Management for Nurses
  • The Interplay Between Nursing and Health Policy
  • Evolution of the Nursing Profession: A Historical Perspective
  • Home Health Care: The Role of Nurses in Community
  • Quality Improvement Initiatives: Nursing’s Contribution
  • Emergency Nursing: Thriving in High-Pressure Situations

To Learn More, Read Relevant Articles

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GED Practice Test

GED Essay Question

The Reasoning Through Language Arts section of the GED includes an “Extended Response” question. This is simply an essay question. You will have 45 minutes to type your answer. This is a tricky part of the GED test, so it’s very important to familiarize yourself with this task ahead of time. First read our essay guide and then review our sample question. Try typing out your own essay before you look at our sample response.

  • GED Essay Writing Guide
  • GED Essay Practice Question
  • GED Essay Sample Response

GED Essay

GED Essay: Everything You Need To Know In 2024

Learn all you need to know about the GED essay, its structure sample, topics, tips, and how it is scored in this post.

January 1, 2022

The GED essay is intimidating to many people. Writing an entire essay from scratch in 45 minutes or less may seem difficult, but it does not have to be. This GED essay writing overview will help you prepare for and learn about the written section of the exam . In this post, Get-TestPrep will show everything you need to know about GED essays , including their structure, sample topics, tips, and how they are stored .

What Is The GED Essay?

GED Essay

The GED exam consists of four subjects : Mathematical Reasoning, Social Studies, Science, and Language Arts Reasoning (RLA ). The GED extended response , sometimes known as the GED essay, is one of the two portions of the RLA subject test. You’ll have 45 minutes to finish the essay to your best capacity. Don’t worry if you don’t finish on time! Because the essay accounts for just 20% of your ultimate RLA score, you can still pass the test even if you don’t receive a high essay score.

The GED extended response can cover a wide range of topics, but it will always be formatted in the same way. You will be assigned two articles on the same topic, which will typically be argumentative essays with a firm position. You’ll be asked to assess the two arguments and create your own argumentative essay based on which article delivered the more compelling argument. The essay should be three to five paragraphs long, with each paragraph including three to seven sentences.

GED Essay Structure

An introduction, a body, and a conclusion are included in every well-written GED essay. You have to write an argument or an argumentative essay. Keep in mind that you are not expressing your own view on the subject. You’re analyzing two of the author’s points of view and determining which one is more compelling. Keep in mind that the Extended Response (GED Essay) is graded by machine intelligence that has been designed to detect the right responses. So, instead of trying to be creative, simply be accurate. Also:

  • Make sure you’re using proper grammar and sentence structure.
  • Practice writing a 300-500 word essay.

Let’s take a look at the format of a GED Essay : an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

  • The introduction outlines your claim or thesis statement and explains the topic you’re writing about. Maintain your position.
  • The body of the essay includes facts and arguments to back up your claim. This section of the response should be at least two paragraphs long.
  • The concluding paragraph restates your claim and summarises your important points.

GED Essay Topic Examples

Here are a few GED Essay Topics to get you started:

Topic 1: An Analysis of Daylight-Saving Time

The article presents arguments from proponents and opponents of Daylight Saving Time, who disagree on the practice’s impact on energy consumption and safety.

Topic 2: Should the Penny Stay in Circulation?

Analyze the arguments offered and pick which one has the most support.

Topic 3: Is Golf a Sport?

Golf , according to proponents, satisfies the criteria of “sport.” Opponents argue that golf more closely resembles a “game” than a “sport.” Analyze both points of view to see which one has the most support.

Visit our website for more topics as well as full articles on each topic and take our free latest FREE GED practice test 2024 to get ready for your exam!

GED Essay Examples

Getting to know the GED essay sample  can assist you in planning your essay and determining which elements are most vital.

When reading the essay topic, you should truly take your time to collect your views. You will be able to articulate your views better on paper if you organize your thoughts properly. Concentrate on the standards that you learned in English class before you begin writing.

Pay attention to how you use the English language (grammar); you must use proper punctuation and capitalization, and you must use appropriate word solutions.

Tips For Writing Your GED Essay

Make sure you carefully read the stimulus and prompt.

Putting this into practice is an excellent idea. Examine each question carefully and set aside some time to determine the topic and the type of response that will be requested. It is critical to read the questions thoroughly. Students frequently skip past the stimulus and prompt and get right into writing, assuming that they will save time this way. 

This is, by far, the most uninteresting thing to do. Take a few moments to attempt to fully comprehend the questions so that you can reply accurately. If you like, underline the important words and phrases in the stimulus so you can go over it again later to make sure you’re on track.

Make a rough outline for the GED language arts essay

In general, planning your essay will only take a few minutes, but it is critical that you spend that time. Make an outline of the essay and follow it as soon as you have a complete understanding of the questions and have scribbled down some early ideas.

Make an outline for your introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this procedure will save you a lot of time and aid in the development of a logical thought process.

Keep your focus on the topic

To describe your evidence, each paragraph in the body of your response should explain why a piece of evidence supports your claim or disputes the opposing claim. You have the option of describing or restarting it. This demonstrates that you know exactly what it means and how it applies to your claim. Refer to the specifics or facts of a certain issue that you’ve discussed and tie them to your claim.

Include evidence from both passages in your response, and explain why strong evidence supports one thesis and why flawed evidence undermines the other.

Revision and proofreading

By the time you’ve finished writing your essay, you should go back to the beginning and reread it attentively, since you may easily have missed a comma or misspelled a term while doing so.

Pay great attention when rereading your essay to see if it has well-targeted arguments, is arranged properly, contains particular information and facts, has good sentence construction, and has no grammatical or spelling mistakes.

Learn more about how to practice GED essays as well as the whole Language Arts section in GED Language Arts Study Guide  

How To Write a GED Essay?

When writing the GED essay, you should allocate the time as follows:

  • 3 minutes to read the directions and the topic
  • 5 minutes of prewriting (freewriting, brainstorming , grouping, mapping, etc.)
  • 3 minutes to organize (create a thesis statement or controlling idea, and summarize important points)
  • 20 minutes to draft (write the essay)
  • 8 minutes to revise (go over the essay and make adjustments to concepts)
  • 6 minutes to edit (check for grammatical and spelling errors). 

How Your GED Essay Is Scored?

Smart machines that are designed to detect the right answers score your GED essay. So don’t try to be creative; just be accurate.

They will evaluate your essay based on five factors.

  • Organization : did you give a well-thought-out approach to writing your essay and were you clear on the main idea?
  • Clear and swift response: Did you deal with the matter appropriately, without straying from one emphasis point to another, with a clear and quick response?
  • Progress and specifics: instead of utilizing lists or repeating the same material, did you use relevant instances and particular details to expound on your initial notions or arguments?
  • Grammar Rules of English: Did you apply proper writing strategies such as sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, syntax, and grammar, and did you shape and revise your essay after you finished the initial draft?
  • Word choice : How well did you pick and use appropriate phrases to express your points of view?

Your 45 minutes will fly by, so focus on these key elements to get the best score possible. What is more important is to state unequivocally which side is more popular. Check that your phrases are clear and that your paragraphs are organized logically.

Each of the four modules (independent subtests) in Mathematical Reasoning (Math), Reasoning via Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies can be taken independently. To pass the subtest(s) for which you registered, you must study thoroughly and be efficient on test day. Consider taking our GED Language Arts Practice Test for the Language Arts section.

GED essay writing can be difficult, but you can keep a list of everything you need to know and switch to proper essay writing approaches before the exam. Simply practice a lot and you’ll notice that it gets better over time. So you’ve learned everything there is to know about writing the GED Essay .

How to write an essay for the GED?

  • Read through all of the instructions.
  • Create an outline.
  • Make a list of all the evidence.
  • Last, write your introduction.
  • Write first, then edit.
  • Make use of formal language.
  • Don’t look at the time.

Is there an essay portion on the GED test?

How is the ged essay graded.

The essay is graded on a four-point scale by two certified GED essay readers. The scores of the two GED readers are averaged. If the essay achieves a score of 2 or above, it is merged with the language arts multiple-choice score to generate a composite result.

Final Words

In conclusion, this guide on the GED essay provides valuable insights and strategies to help you excel in the GED essay section. By understanding the structure of the GED essay , practicing effective writing techniques, and familiarizing yourself with the scoring rubric, you can approach the GED essay with confidence and achieve a successful outcome. Remember to plan your essay, organize your thoughts, and support your ideas with relevant examples and evidence. Additionally, refining your grammar and punctuation skills will enhance the overall quality of your writing. With consistent practice and a thorough understanding of the expectations for the GED essay, you can showcase your writing abilities and earn a strong score on the GED essay.

Eligibility Requirements For GED In District of Columbia

November 25, 2022

ged requirements

Eligibility Requirements For GED In New York

Wyoming ged requirements

Eligibility Requirements For GED In Wyoming

You may learn more about how to obtain a GED in Wyoming by reading the answers to the questions related to GED requirements in Wyoming we receive below.

September 19, 2022

How to Pass the GED

How to Pass the GED

Extended Response: Example 1

Extended Response: Example 3

Basics The second section of Reasoning Through Language Arts evaluates your ability to integrate reading and writing by way of a 45-minute Extended Response. GED guidelines specify that you will be asked to write an essay about the best-supported position—the most persuasive side of an argument—presented in two passages with opposing points of view.  Accordingly, you will need to produce evidence supporting the most convincing position from either Passage I or Passage II.  Attention to specific details within the passages will help you find the necessary pieces of evidence.

GED.com has excellent resources to help prepare for the Extended Response as follows: • poster • videos • guidelines – english • guidelines – spanish • quick tips – english • quick tips – spanish • practice passages – english • practice passages – spanish

Here, at HowtoPasstheGED.com, a five-paragraph essay will be used as a framework for writing an Extended Response.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Outline Paragraph 1:  Introduction of your position with three supporting points. Paragraph 2:  Discussion of first point. Paragraph 3:  Discussion of second point. Paragraph 4:  Discussion of third point. Paragraph 5:  Summary and Conclusion of your position and its three supporting points.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Choose (Before You Write) • Read Passage I and Passage II. • Choose the best-supported position. • Select three points supporting this position.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Beginner Level (You’re Up and Running!) • Write the first sentence of each of the five paragraphs. • In paragraph 1, introduce your position and its three supporting points. • In paragraph 2, put down the first point. • In paragraph 3, put down the second point. • In paragraph 4, put down the third point. • In paragraph 5, restate your position and its three supporting points.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Intermediate Level (You’re Adding On!) • In paragraph 1, introduce your position and its three supporting points. • In paragraph 2, write at least three sentences about the first point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 3, write at least three sentences about the second point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 4, write at least three sentences about the third point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 5, restate your position and its three supporting points, including coming to a conclusion about them.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Advanced Level (Polish Your Essay If You Have Time) • In paragraph 1, introduce your position and its three supporting points. • In paragraph 2, write at least three sentences about the first point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 3, write at least three sentences about the second point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 4, write at least three sentences about the third point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 5, restate your position and its three supporting points, including coming to a conclusion about them.

The example below goes over the process of writing a five-paragraph essay as an Extended Response to Passage I versus Passage II.

Passage I Working from Home is Beneficial

Some experts say there’s no going back now that both employers and workers have learned that telework can be effective.

“The pandemic has radically changed how we view telework or remote work,” said Timothy Golden, a professor of management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. “Many individuals and companies have realized that we can work remotely effectively. And so, I think remote work is here to stay.”

“We are going to err on the side of letting more people work remotely for longer periods of time,” said Ravi Gajendran, chair of the Department of Global Leadership and Management in the College of Business at Florida International University.

“When that’s not working as well,” added Gajendran, “the pendulum will sort of swing slightly back towards the office. It’s not going to come back to what it was previously, but what we’re going to find is, as new employees join, as new teams form, and as people who have not worked together before are now working remotely, things are not going to be as smooth.”

But, said Golden, “We know that many employees have been highly productive during the pandemic and have been able to carry on their work in a fashion that was consistent with their productivity before the pandemic.”

According to Cathleen Swody, an organizational psychologist at Thrive Leadership, remote work has led to more authentic moments between co-workers who’ve ended up meeting a colleague’s pets or families online, as the pandemic provided a virtual window, and therefore greater insight, into a co-worker’s personal side than working at the office ever did.

“You’ve seen many large companies, and in different industries, make announcements about the future of their workforce in how it is likely to be hybrid. And some workers will be working remotely on a permanent basis, and others will be in a hybrid form,” pointed out Golden. “Companies that do this right and do this in the right way, will have a competitive advantage over those who do not.”

Increased telework could free employees from having to live close to where they work. That could also benefit employers who won’t have to be limited to the local talent pool. More jobs could go to places with lower costs of living and ultimately, overseas.

“It could go to Asia or Africa or South America,” said Gajendran.

With more employees working remotely from home, employers could reduce their costs further by cutting back on office space. – adapted from VOA (04/09/2021, 04/12/2021, 04/29/21)

Passage II Working from Home is Harmful

The benefits of working from home—including skipping a long commute and having a better work-life balance—have been well documented, but employees are literally paying for the privilege, according to a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research.

“People need to dedicate space to work from home,” said Christopher Stanton, an Associate Professor at Harvard Business School who co-authored the study. “For many folks who lived in small apartments or houses before the pandemic, working from home wasn’t a a realistic long-term solution unless they could upgrade to larger apartments or houses.”

The researchers analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau to reach their conclusions. They found that between 2013 and 2017, households with at least one teleworker spent on average more of their income on rent or a mortgage to pay for the extra room needed to work from home.

“A household that was spending about $1,000 a month on rent would be spending around $1,070 on rent. So, it’s about a 7% increase, on average, across the income distribution,” Stanton said.

The researchers estimate that about 10% of people who worked in an office before the pandemic could permanently transition to working from home full time. A recent Upwork survey suggests that 36 million Americans will be working remotely by 2025—an 87% increase over pre-pandemic levels, and these workers could potentially take on the additional costs.

The added expense is easier for high-income households to bear but puts an increased burden on workers who earn less money.

“You might have gotten an increase of 20-ish percent in housing expenses for lower-income households with remote workers compared to lower-income households without remote workers,” Stanton said. “That’s a pretty big chunk of expenditure for those households in the bottom half of the income distribution.”

Kristen Carpenter, chief psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Ohio State University, added that at-home, remote work causes more work to be performed outside normal business hours, so it’s hard “to draw a boundary that prevents work from being ever-present,” including nights and weekends.

Cathleen Swody, an organizational psychologist at Thrive Leadership, also pointed out that when people work from home, “they kind of get stuck in this little place,” whereas going back to the office leads to more interpersonal interaction and innovation. – adapted from VOA (04/09/2021, 04/12/2021, 04/29/21)

Prompt Passage I finds working from home to be beneficial; Passage II finds working from home to be harmful. In your response, analyze the positions presented in Passage I and Passage II to determine which passage is best supported. Use relevant and specific evidence to back your choice. You have 45 minutes to plan, type, and edit your response.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Choose (Before You Write) • Read Passage I and Passage II. • Choose the best-supported position. In this example, Passage I is chosen as the best-supported position. • Select three points supporting this position. (1) Working from home is productive. (2) Working from home improves employee interaction. (3) Working from home saves money.

Passage I is the best-supported position because working from home is productive, improves employee interaction, and saves money.

Working from home is productive.

Working from home improves employee interaction.

Working from home saves money.

In summary, Passage I is the best-supported position because working from home is productive, improves employee interaction, and saves money.

Working from home is productive.  Passage I uses the pandemic to make the relevant observation that individuals and companies realized they could work remotely effectively.  Many employees have been highly productive this way and can stay this way.  Passage II admits in its very first sentence that the benefits of working from home have been well documented. 

Working from home improves employee interaction.  Passage I is persuasive when it notes that remote work has led to “more authentic moments” between co-workers.  However, workers still have the option of working at the office, as well as at home, in a hybrid form.  Thus, Passage II is incorrect when it claims remote workers get stuck in one place.

Working from home saves money.  Passage I makes a convincing argument for freedom.  It asserts that remote work frees employees from having to live close to office buildings.  It also frees employers from having to pay for as much office space.  Passage II says employees need to spend some money to outfit a home office, but this is less costly than commuting.

In summary, Passage I is the best-supported position because working from home is productive, improves employee interaction, and saves money.  In conclusion, there is no place like home.

Working from home is productive.  Passage I uses an authority—Timothy Golden, a professor of management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—to make the following relevant observation: “The pandemic has radically changed how we view telework or remote work.  Many individuals and companies have realized that we can work remotely effectively.  We know that many employees have been highly productive during the pandemic and have been able to carry on their work in a fashion that was consistent with their productivity before the pandemic.  And so, I think remote work is here to stay.”  Passage II admits that at least some of what Golden said is true by stating in its very first sentence “the benefits of working from home—including skipping a long commute and having a better work-life balance—have been well documented.” 

Working from home improves employee interaction.  Passage I effectively uses another expert—Cathleen Swody, an organizational psychologist at Thrive Leadership—to state that remote work has led to “more authentic moments between co-workers who’ve ended up meeting a colleague’s pets or families online, as the pandemic provided a virtual window, and therefore greater insight, into a co-worker’s personal side than working at the office ever did.”  Although Passage II says people who work from home “kind of get stuck in this little place,” Golden affirms that workers aren’t really stuck, because some will be working in a hybrid form, meaning partly at home and partly in an office.

Working from home saves money.  Passage I makes a convincing argument for freedom.  Remote work saves money by freeing employees from having to live close to office buildings and freeing employers from having to pay for as much office space.  According to Christopher Stanton (Associate Professor at Harvard Business School) in Passage II, employees need to spend some money to outfit their apartments or houses with a home office, but this is a small price to pay compared to avoiding a costly daily commute.

In summary, Passage I is the best-supported position because working from home is productive, improves employee interaction, and saves money.  In particular, Passage I leads to the conclusion that working from home is beneficial in that it leaves nobody out: Both employers and employees stand to gain.

Remember, the RLA Extended Response is based on what YOU determine to be the best-supported position presented in either Passage I or Passage II. In order to demonstrate that YOU have room to maneuver, the example below goes over the process of writing a five-paragraph essay as an Extended Response to Passage I versus Passage II with a different choice.

Prior to the pandemic, about 5 million Americans worked remotely. But COVID-19 forced U.S. employers to allow telework on a massive scale, resulting in an estimated 75 million people working from home over the past year.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Choose (Before You Write) • Read Passage I and Passage II. • Choose the best-supported position. In this example, Passage II is chosen as the best-supported position. • Select three points supporting this position. (1) Working from home is unproductive. (2) Working from home hampers employee interaction. (3) Working from home costs money.

Passage II is the best-supported position because working from home is unproductive, hampers employee interaction, and costs money.

Working from home is unproductive.

Working from home hampers employee interaction.

Working from home costs money.

In summary, Passage II is the best-supported position because working from home is unproductive, hampers employee interaction, and costs money.

Working from home is unproductive.  Backed by facts, Passage II is able to make a strong statement when it says working in small setups at home ultimately ends up in fatigue and less productive employees.  In fact, fifty-four percent of home workers feel overworked and 39% are exhausted.  Passage I has no numbers to back up its claim that people can work remotely effectively.

Working from home hampers employee interaction.  Passage II cleverly notes that when people work from home, they get stuck.  Going back to the office leads to more interpersonal interaction and innovation.  Passage I even admits that working from home doesn’t always work well, meaning that people end up back in the office.

Working from home costs money.  Passage II convincingly has money in mind when it states that households with at least one teleworker have to spend some of their income to pay for the extra room needed to work from home.  Lower-income households need to spend even more of their income to set things up at home.  Passage I offers no solutions for employees paying out of pocket to work from home.

In summary, Passage II is the best-supported position because working from home is unproductive, hampers employee interaction, and costs money.  In conclusion, there are places other than home.

Working from home is unproductive.  Passage II comes out swinging with Christopher Stanton, an Associate Professor at Harvard Business School, who asserts having nonergonomic setups in small places [at home] ultimately ends up “leading to fatigue and wear and tear and less productive employees in the long run.”  In fact, “fifty-four percent of people who’ve worked from home this past year feel overworked, and 39% say they’re downright exhausted.”  Although Timothy Golden (professor of management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) claims in Passage I that “many individuals and companies have realized that we can work remotely effectively,” he has no real numbers to back him up.

Working from home hampers employee interaction.  Passage II cites another authority—Cathleen Swody, an organizational psychologist at Thrive Leadership—to point out that people who work from home “kind of get stuck in this little place.”  She goes on to convincingly argue that “going back to the office leads to more interpersonal interaction and innovation.”  In Passage I, Ravi Gajendran, chair of the Department of Global Leadership and Management in the College of Business at Florida International University, even admits that working from home doesn’t always work well, such that “the pendulum will sort of swing” back towards the office.

Working from home costs money.  Passage II hits home with data from the U.S. Census Bureau, which found that “between 2013 and 2017, households with at least one teleworker spent on average more of their income on rent or a mortgage to pay for the extra room needed to work from home.”  Stanton adds that “you might have gotten an increase of 20-ish percent in housing expenses for lower-income households with remote workers compared to lower-income households without remote workers, a pretty big chunk of expenditure for those households in the bottom half of the income distribution.”  Passage I offers no solutions for employees “literally paying for the privilege” of working from home.

In summary, Passage II is the best-supported position because working from home is unproductive, hampers employee interaction, and costs money.  In particular, Passage II leads to the conclusion that working from home can be so harmful that it never stops, becoming an “ever-present” task performed outside normal business hours without a boundary.

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  • GED: Writing Test — Part II, Essay
  • High School
  • High School Equivalency Exams
  • CHSPE: Study, Exam Basics
  • GED: Format of the Test
  • GED: Introduction to Mathematics, Parts I and II
  • GED: Language Arts Reading Test — Subjects to Know
  • GED: Science
  • GED: Social Studies Test
  • GED: Taking the GED Test
  • GED: Writing Test — Part I, Multiple Choice

What You Should Know

Your essay will be scored on how well your essay shows

An understanding of the topic

Clear and logical organization

Specific supporting examples and details

Proper grammar, usage, and spelling

Proper use of a variety of words

Remember: No score will be given to papers that are written on the wrong topic, are illegible (impossible to read), or are blank.

For an essay to be effective, the reader must understand and easily follow the writer's expression of ideas.

What You Should Do

Follow these basic steps:

Read the question carefully.

Spend a few minutes planning your answer using the scratch paper provided.

Write a clear statement of purpose.

As you continue writing, keep your purpose clearly in mind.

Write a conclusion, or ending, that points toward the future.

Reread your essay, and correct any errors you find.

The following section will use an example to carefully explain the techniques in writing a good essay.

A Sample Essay

Sample Topic:

Many people believe that television has changed the world. For some, these changes have been negative, and for others they have been positive.

In your essay, you may write about the positive effects, the negative effects, or both. Use your personal observations, experiences, and knowledge to support your essay.

Analysis and Techniques

Step 1: Read the Question Carefully

As you read the essay question, note the key words. Notice that you must discuss "the effects of television" and that you must "support your essay." If you do not focus on the effects of television or do not support your essay — provide specific examples — you will not receive a passing score.

Step 2: Spend a Few Minutes Planning Your Answer

With only a few minutes to plan, you should jot down information quickly and in an effective way. One technique for doing this is clustering — which looks like the hub of a wheel with spokes sticking out.

Jot down the topic you have been asked to discuss, "effects of television," and draw a circle around this phrase. This is the "hub" (or center) of your wheel.

Draw a spoke (a line) coming out from the hub. At the end of the spoke, jot down a specific example of the effects of television and draw a circle around the example. Continue adding more spokes to the hub as you get more ideas. For the sample topic (effects of television), you could have: video stores profit; brings world closer-news; less use for reading; mind pollution; eat TV snacks; people don't exercise.

At this point, don't worry about whether your examples are "good" or not; just write down whatever comes to mind.

Number the clusters to show which ones you plan to use and in what order.

Remember that other ideas will come to you as you write. You might want to include these in your essay.

Step 3: Write a Clear Statement of Purpose

Your readers will be looking for a clear theme or position that is supported throughout the essay. To state your purpose, take the topic (effects of television) and give an opinion about the topic that you can support with your examples. For instance:

Watching too much television has polluted our minds and weakened our bodies.

Because of television, we are all reading less, but we are learning much more.

There are both "positives" and "nagatives" about watching television.

After writing your statement of purpose, add a sentence or two introducing the examples you intend to discuss:

Watching too much television has polluted our minds and weakened our bodies. Most TV shows are written at a low level. They are meant to appeal to a low mentality. People who become addicted to these low level shows spend less time in healthy, outdoor activities. They get out of shape and learn very little.

Notice that the opening paragraph focuses on two of the negative effects of television. The question allows you to focus on "the positive effects, the negative effects, or both." Beginning with a purpose statement that promises to discuss both positive and negative effects, you might instead compose an opening paragraph as follows:

The positive effects of television far outweigh the negative ones. Although some people may be reading and exercising less because they watch TV too much, many are learning more about the world than ever before.

Because you are given a choice, either of these openings would be appropriate for the topic.

Step 4: As You Continue Writing, Keep Your Purpose Clearly in Mind

Writing the body of the essay means giving specific details that tell more about the examples you have introduced. Make sure that your details are specific and that they support your purpose. For instance, if your purpose is to show that "watching too much television has polluted our minds and weakened our bodies," every detail should be a particular instance of how television pollutes minds and weakens bodies. The following example repeats one of the opening paragraphs given above and adds a paragraph of specifics.

Consider a family on a typical Thursday night in a typical American home. They begin by watching the evening news, which contains only short, simple overviews of complicated news stories. Then, thinking that they are "informed on issues of the day," the family switches to game shows and pretends to be smart by watching other smart people answer questions on Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy. Then, along with millions of others, this family sits and laughs at the same old jokes and the same old plots and the same old characters on The Simpsons, Friends, Malcolm in the Middle, E.R., and The Practice. Then one more half-hour of " happy talk" news, weather, sports, and these TV addicts go off to sleep with laugh tracks and commercial jingles in their heads. Of course, they have been munching TV snacks all this time, rather than enjoying the fresh night air, and maybe exercising.

So far, this composition is not perfect, but it is strong in its specific examples and its control of purpose.

Step 5: Write a Conclusion that Points Toward the Future

Rather than writing a conclusion that just repeats what you have already said, you should use what you have said to either tie things together or make a final, new point. To do this, take the information you have discussed and tell how it will probably affect the future. For instance:

If people keep spending more time watching television and less time reading and playing, we will be sorry that TV was ever invented because it will make us a world of out-of-shape illiterates.

Step 6: Reread Your Essay and Correct Any Errors You Find

Always allow a few minutes to proofread your essay for errors in grammar, usage, and spelling. To make sure that you proofread carefully, try this: With your scratch paper, cover all but the first line of your essay. Read that line carefully. Then uncover and read the second line, and so forth. If you find an error, line it out carefully and write your correction neatly. Keep in mind that your handwriting must be legible (easy to read).

What is the solution for x in the following system of equations?

2 x + 3 y = 42

2 y – 3 x = –19

70 GED Essay Topics

The GED, or General Educational Development, is a credential that is awarded to students who choose not to finish high school but still need to prove that they have the skills necessary to place into college-level courses.

The GED test is split into four sections: writing, reading, math, and science. Each section is multiple choice save for the RLA section, which requires students to craft an essay response to a given prompt within 45 minutes.

What Type of GED Essay Will Be Required?

Typically, students taking the GED test will need to write an argumentative, persuasive, or informative essay.

An argumentative essay will require the test taker to support their opinion with evidence and reasoning.

A persuasive essay will require the test taker to convince the reader of their point of view using evidence and reasoning.

An informative essay will only require the student to provide information without giving an opinion or persuading anyone.

The prompt will offer insight into the best essay type to choose, so it is best to pay close attention to the prompt when reading.

GED Essay Rubric: Determining the Quality of Your Essay

This essay can be tricky to write if you aren’t familiar with academic requirements, so it’s best to use a GED essay rubric as a guide.

A GED essay rubric is simply a list of criteria that you can use to evaluate your responses. You can think of it as a frame for your writing. If your essay meets the requirements in each area, then you’ve done all you need to do, and your answer is complete.

However, keep in mind that while the rubric is important, it doesn’t act as a replacement for your own critical thinking. Instead, it’s there to help you assess your work at the end of the writing process and give you an idea of how well you did.

For example, let’s say you were asked to write an essay about what makes healthy relationships. Here are the criteria you should have covered in your essay:

Introduction

The introduction should include a thesis statement that states what you will discuss within your paper. This allows the reader to understand where you are heading early on in your writing process. You can also use it as an opportunity to establish common ground with your audience, which is especially important if your essay is going to be discussing a controversial topic.

In the case of our healthy relationships essay, you might start by talking about what most people would consider to be a healthy relationship. This could be anything from having common interests and mutual respect to communicating openly and honestly.

The body of your essay is where you will go into more depth on the subject, whether that be by drawing examples from personal experience or providing research to support your argument.

Your writing should always begin with a topic sentence that states exactly what your supporting idea is. This allows the reader to follow along easily and ensures that all of your thoughts are cohesive and organized.

The conclusion should summarize everything that you talked about in your essay. Of course, it’s a good idea to restate your thesis statement, but you can also use it as an opportunity to provide your own thoughts on the topic. For example, in the case of our healthy relationships essay, you might want to say something like:

“Healthy relationships build people up, not tear them down. This could be ones where people share similar interests, communicate openly and honestly, or respect one another’s personal space. However, not everyone will agree on what makes a relationship healthy, which is why it’s important to realize that there are many different opinions on the matter.”

It’s important to remember that each section of your essay should be cohesive and work together to create a full picture for the reader. Your introduction leads into your body, which leads to your conclusion, just like a good story would. If you don’t do this, your essay will seem choppy and unfinished.

How Can I Prepare for the Essay Writing Section of the GED Test?

Since the content of your essay will depend on the writing prompt given during the test, it can be difficult to prepare for the writing section. However, there are some things you can do to better equip yourself for test day.

For example, you should make sure that you practice writing under timed conditions. This will help to simulate the stress of the test and ensure that you can still produce quality work under pressure.

You should also make sure to read over practice writing prompts ahead of time. This will give you a sense of what the test may ask and help you determine the best answers for them.

To help practice writing skills and timed essay writing, consider using the following GED essay prompts as part of your preparation.

GED Essay Topics About Relationships & Family

  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of large vs. small families?
  • Discuss the positive and negative effects of sports on relationships.
  • What is the best way to handle a disagreement with a loved one?
  • What are some tips for maintaining a healthy relationship?
  • How can people improve their communication skills?
  • What makes a successful long-term relationship?
  • Can technology interfere with interpersonal relationships?
  • Why do teen relationships often end in disaster?
  • Is it better to be single or in a relationship?
  • What are the benefits of staying single?
  • How can people tell if they’re ready for a committed relationship?
  • How do different cultures view relationships?
  • What is an open relationship?
  • Compare the benefits and drawbacks of polyamory?
  • What are some signs that a relationship is unhealthy?
  • How can people make their relationships more fulfilling?

GED Essay Topics About Political Science

  • What are the responsibilities of citizens during an election?
  • How can people get involved in politics at their local level?
  • How does voting impact our government?
  • To what extent do lobbyists influence public officials?
  • What is gridlock, and how does it affect Washington DC?
  • Why did voter turnout decline in the 2016 presidential election?
  • How can people stay informed about current events?
  • Why is social media so influential in politics?
  • What are some important facts to consider before voting?
  • How has technology changed the way campaigns are run?
  • What are some of the political repercussions of global warming?
  • Who should be responsible for protecting the environment, corporations or politicians?
  • What are some of the most important responsibilities of a president?
  • How does a democracy differ from authoritarianism?
  • What are some causes and effects of political corruption?
  • How has social media impacted politics?
  • What effect can social media have on civil unrest or riots?
  • How do historians determine if a political leader was effective or not?
  • Why is it important to study history?

GED Essay Topics About Education

  • What is the most important thing students should learn in school?
  • How can schools better prepare students for college and careers?
  • What makes a good teacher?
  • How do different teaching methods impact student learning?
  • Should schools start later in the morning?
  • What are the benefits of homeschooling?
  • What is the best way to discipline students?
  • How can schools create a safe and positive learning environment for all students?
  • Should standardized tests be eliminated?
  • How does technology impact student learning?
  • What are some ways schools can save money?
  • Should teachers be paid more?
  • What makes a good school district?
  • What are some ways to improve education in the United States?
  • Should students have more say in what they learn in school?
  • How can schools better prepare students for the real world?
  • What is the value of a college education?

GED Essay Topics About Social Issues

  • What is the best way to handle bullying?
  • What is the cause of social anxiety?
  • How does society benefit from having homeless people?
  • What are some solutions for ending poverty?
  • How can we reduce crime rates in our communities?
  • Are there positive aspects to social media addiction?
  • What effects does war have on society?
  • What should be done about the increasing number of refugees?
  • How can we reduce the amount of violence in our society?
  • What is the root cause of racism?
  • What are the effects of sexism and gender discrimination?
  • Is social media tearing us apart or bringing us closer together?
  • Should everyone have the same rights and opportunities?
  • How can we create a more tolerant society?
  • What are some solutions for poverty and homelessness?
  • How does technology impact social issues?
  • What can be done to reduce the number of guns in society?
  • Should we allow refugees into our country?

With these 70 GED writing prompts, students can get in the essential practice needed to complete the essay writing section of the test within the allotted time. The prompts can also be used as a study tool to help students better understand the types of topics covered on the exam. By following these tips, students can feel more confident and prepared when taking the GED writing test.

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GED Practice Questions

GED Sample Essay

The following is an example of a high-scoring essay response to our free practice GED Essay Prompt. Below our GED sample essay is a brief analysis justifying its perfect score.

Police militarization is a hot-button topic these days. Some believe that criticizing the actions of the police hurts their ability to do their job, while others argue that the police are overstepping their authority and often cause more harm than good. Both passages address this issue head on; however, the critique of police militarization published by the ACLU is the best-supported and ultimately the most convincing argument.

While the second passage lacks specific statistical data, the ACLU states that there were 80,000 military raids by police last year. This is surprising and supports the idea that military-style raids have become too commonplace in society. The writer then highlights the inherent problem with these raids: “of all the incidents studied where the number and race of the people impacted were known, 39 percent were Black, 11 percent were Latino, 20 were white.” Police militarization has disproportionately impacted African-Americans, further supporting how detrimental police militarization is to society.

Another reason why the ACLU’s argument is better-supported than Hagner’s argument is because it directly discusses ethical corruption, unlike Hagner’s essay. The ACLU states, “Companies like Lockheed Martin and Blackhawk Industries are making record profits by selling their equipment to local police departments that have received Department of Homeland Security grants.” The ACLU implies that the reason for this militarization is profit; if this is true, then there is no actual real-world need for the militarization of the police. Private companies are ultimately designed to make money, not help the police, so police militarization poses an ethical problem.

Finally, the ACLU’s argument is much more convincing than Hagner’s argument because it uses much more impactful diction. The forcefulness of calling the drug war “wasteful and failed” highlights the high-stakes nature of this issue. Readers, most likely taxpayers, have a vested interest in not having their money wasted by the government. The author goes on to imply that the reader may not be safe, since “heavily armed SWAT teams are raiding people’s homes in the middle of the night.” The tone of this essay is much more impassioned than the tone of the second, helping to draw engage the reader on an emotional level.

Sample Essay Analysis

This essay is very well-organized. It uses 5 paragraphs and lays out the structure in the following manner:

  • Paragraph 1 — Introduction (why the ACLU position is better-supported)
  • Paragraph 2 — Reason #1 — Statistics (two examples given from passage)
  • Paragraph 3 — Reason #2 — Ethics (one example given from passage)
  • Paragraph 4 — Reason #3 — Diction (two examples given from passage)
  • Paragraph 5 — Conclusion

In the introduction, the author thoughtfully presents the topic of police militarization and explains why it is relevant in today’s society. Both arguments are introduced, and the thesis is clearly placed at the end of the paragraph so they are easy for the reader to find. The thesis clearly states which argument the author believes is better-supported, and the language is confident.

Each of the next three body paragraphs is well-organized, starting with transitional words or phrases and including at least one example that supports the thesis. The body paragraphs cite specific examples from the passage, and then explain how those examples support the overall argument. The author uses three different examples: statistics, ethics, and vocabulary, to prove why the ACLU’s argument is better-supported. These diverse examples show that the author understands what makes an argument weak or strong.

Finally, the concluding paragraph makes a minor concession to the opposing side, praising the numbered list that appears therein, before reiterating the thesis from the Introduction.

The essay avoids any grammar or spelling errors and the sentence structure is clear and varied with the appropriate usage of commas and other punctuation. Clear command of the English language is demonstrated. As a result, this essay would earn a perfect score.

GED Practice Questions >>

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GED Extended Response Essay Guide

The GED Extended Response (ER) can make or break your score. While you can pass the GED exam earning 0 points on the ER section, it’s not a great idea to count on doing well enough on the rest of the exam to make up for it. The essay is worth about 20% of your raw score, and any extra points you gain will help you pass the Language Arts section on the first try.

The ER is rigidly structured, and the GED graders are looking for an essay that follows a particular structure. Though it may seem daunting, the more you practice writing this type of essay, the more you will realize that the essay is very formulaic. Follow the formula every time for a successful essay!

How to Write a Great GED Extended Response Essay

The GED Extended Response Essay is persuasive writing, meaning that you are trying to prove a point in your essay.

Read the prompt carefully (Analyze)

Sample essay prompt:

Analyze the arguments presented in the two speeches.

In your response, develop an argument in which you explain how one position is better

supported than the other. Incorporate relevant and specific evidence from both sources

to support your argument. Remember, the better-argued position is not necessarily the position with which you agree. This task should take approximately 45 minutes to complete.

When you read an essay prompt, take care to note what “action words” are used. In this case, the words “analyze”, “develop”, and “incorporate” are used. Take care in your essay to do each of these tasks just as the prompt tells you. As you read the source material, look out for items that match these tasks.

Organize your thoughts (Analyze/Develop)

After you have read both of the source materials, you should determine which argument is better supported by evidence. There are a few ways to do this, but one of the most common is writing a two-column list that lists out each of the points from each source.

As you read, determine the better supported argument by analyzing the facts presented. Where is the source from? Are the ideas presented based on facts or ideas and speculation? Consider the audience, context, message, purpose, author, the proof, and the style of the writing itself when you evaluate the sources.

After you determine which argument is better supported, list 2-3 pieces of evidence you want to cite in your essay. Assign each piece of evidence 2-3 supporting details explaining your reasoning.

Write Your Essay

An essay usually has three parts: an introduction, body, and a conclusion. If you’ve ever written a basic essay, you’re well on your way to understanding the structure of the GED ER.

Essay Introduction

Your essay should include an introduction and thesis statement. This is one of the most important parts of your essay. It shows the graders that you are organized and know exactly what you want to say.

Open your essay with a general statement that is relevant to the topic and then create your thesis. Your thesis should be a statement that can be debated by anyone (e.g. The second source presents a stronger argument because…). A good thesis will tell your readers exactly what you want to say.

Here’s an example of a thesis statement:

“The second argument is better supported because it presents stronger statistics, better logical reasoning, and comes from a more reliable source.”

This statement explains exactly what the author intends to talk about. This thesis statement gives an outline for the rest of the essay and will help you structure your essay as you write.

The body of your essay is where you support your ideas that you listed in the thesis and answer the prompt.  Each paragraph should begin with a topic sentence. These help the reader understand what you’re going to write about in your paragraph. Each topic sentence should relate back to the thesis and support it by giving details you pull from the source material. You can use quotes, detail your argument, and support your opinion in the body paragraphs.

Be sure your paragraphs always address the subject and put emphasis on analysis. When analyzing an argument, explain why your position is correct. Use supporting details as evidence to describe why the argument is stronger. Contrast the other, weaker argument’s details, then describe why the argument they make is not as strong.

Here are some examples of arguments you can use in your thesis and body paragraphs:

  • Logical argument — what kind of evidence does the author use? Does the logic they use make sense?
  • Reasonable assumptions — what assumptions does the author make? Is the conclusion they make reasonable?
  • Ethics — Does the author talk about the right or “moral” thing to do?
  • Statistics and numbers — What kinds of numbers and statistics are used to prove the author’s point?
  • Emotional appeal — How is the author trying to make you feel with the argument?
  • Appeal to authority — What kinds of people does the author cite as experts? Are they reputable?
  • Historical precedent — Does the author use a historical event or precedent to back up their claim?
  • Language — What kind of language is used? How does the language make you feel? How does the language demonstrate the author’s opinion?

Use words and phrases that help your sentences flow smoothly. Some examples include: “As per the first source…”, “In the text…”, “…stated”, “In addition”, “However”, “In sum…”

Be sure to use different sentence structures as you write, as it shows your excellent writing skills and keeps the reader interested.

You should use a different paragraph for each new point you make, meaning you should have 2-3 body paragraphs. Each paragraph also must be at least 3-7 sentences long. Assemble your paragraphs in a logical order, and be sure to tie your details back to the main point.

Essay Conclusion

After you have written your body paragraphs, write a conclusion paragraph to sum up your thoughts. A very easy way to do this is to restate your thesis statement in a slightly different way. You can then list your main points again. This creates an essay that feels well-rounded and reaffirms your stance.

After you’ve finished writing, be sure to use any extra time you have to fix grammar and usage mistakes, as these contribute to your score.

You should aim to have about 300-500+ words in your essay. Though this may seem like a lot, remember that 300 words is only half a typed page, and that 500 words is a full page. Remember, a well-written essay doesn’t have to be long to get the point across.

Tips to Write a Better Extended Response Essay

  • Practice active reading. Active reading is when you interact with the text as you read it. Underline, highlight, and write yourself notes in the margins or on a separate sheet. Mark the most important parts of the text and the main points. This will not only help you understand what the text actually says, but it will save you a lot of time when planning your writing. You can even use this technique to easily pull quotes into your essay!
  • Time yourself when you practice so you understand how much time you have.
  • One mistake many writers make is picking a side and arguing based on their opinion. This will not earn you any points on the ER!
  •  You must consider that the prompt asks you to determine which argument is better supported by evidence. The argument that is better supported may not be a position you agree with.
  • Better readers are often better writers. Practice your reading skills often.
  • Visualize each body paragraph you write like an upside-down pyramid. Your broadest statements (i.e. topic sentences, introductory sentences) should be at the broadest end of the pyramid. Your most specific, detailed statements should be closer to the middle and bottom parts of the pyramid.

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111 Robots Essay Topic Ideas & Examples

🏆 best robots topic ideas & essay examples, 👍 good essay topics on robots, ⭐ simple & easy robots essay titles, ❓ questions about robots.

  • Robots and Artificial Intelligence One the one hand, with artificial intelligence and fully autonomous robots, organizations will be able to optimize their spending and increase the speed of development and production of their commodities.
  • Robots: The Use in Everyday Tasks The recent advancements in robotics and artificial intelligence have the potential to automate a wide range of human activities and to dramatically reshape the way people live and work in the coming decades. We will write a custom essay specifically for you by our professional experts 808 writers online Learn More
  • The Use of Robots in Warfare The military advancement in the use of robots in warfare will at long last essentially drastically reduce the role of human beings in war. The increased use of robots in the battlefield needs countries to […]
  • Visions of the Future in the Film I, Robot Even though some of the aspects of the filmmaker’s vision of future are possible, and very likely to become reality, the essence of the film appears highly unrealistic.
  • Will Robots Take Over Human Jobs? Most of these people argue that due to the increasing number of computer equipped robots, the banking industry, the technical industry and even the administrative departments of many countries have suffered great losses at the […]
  • The Dyson Robotic Vacuum: Target Group and Marketing Plan Thus, the target audience of Dyson in Ontario is practical and prudent people who, when buying equipment, pay attention primarily to the prestige of the brand, the quality, and the durability of the purchased goods.
  • Discussion: Will Robots Replace Us? The world is moving forward, space and the ocean’s depths, and the peculiarities of the brain’s structure and the human body are being studied.
  • Characteristics of Robotics What concerns the elaboration of an obstacle course in a “real-world” simulation, it is essential to ensure the presence of several procedure testing steps that will determine the functionality of a robot. What concerns the […]
  • Autonomous Robots Since they are self sufficient, the autonomous robots have the capacity to work in the absence of human beings. In the future, humanoid robots might have the intelligence and emotions similar to those of human […]
  • Isaac Asimov’s “Robot Dreams” and Alex Proyas’ “I, Robot” Driving to work involves the use of evolving technology as every car made today includes varying degrees of computerized information systems that inform the vehicle of important information everything from the need for an oil […]
  • Use of Robots in Computer Science Currently, the most significant development in the field of computer science is the inclusion of robots as teaching tools. The use of robots in teaching computer science has significantly helped to endow students with valuable […]
  • Robots’ Impact and Human Employment Opportunities Many of the costs of complying with the isolation rules, the costs associated with the spread of the disease, can actually be offset by replacing the workforce with robots.
  • Robotic Pharmacy System Implementation Citing some of the key benefits of the robotic pharmacy system, one of the most important is that it reduces the need for technical labor significantly.
  • The Invento Robotics Products Analysis The 5 C’s of brand management has grown in popularity since it thoroughly evaluates all the important aspects of a company and allows for approach adjustments depending on what is and is not effective.
  • The Place of Humanity in the Robotic Future The developers are trying to implement the brain, the human mind, in a digital environment. Paying attention to mechanical machines, commonly called “robots”, can be seen that they are created in the image and likeness […]
  • Artificial Intelligence in “I, Robot” by Alex Proyas To begin with, AI is defined by Nilsson as a field of computer science that attempts to enhance the level of intelligence of computer systems.
  • The Wireless Robotic Car: Design Project In this prototype, the task is to design a robotic car that can be controlled by a computer using wireless communication technology.
  • Is the Robotics Development Helpful or Harmful? Robots remain the best option, as they will connect the children with the happenings in the school. They will dress the robot with their favorite clothes, communicate with the teacher using the robot, and swivel […]
  • Ways that Robotics Can Transform Our Daily Lives Robots will help to increase the labor force in the country in the future. Robots will be used to increase the productivity of human labor within the government sector and help in speeding up the […]
  • Exploring the Capabilities and Potential of Soft Robotics One of the critical advantages of soft robots is their ability to deform and adapt to their surroundings, making them ideal for tasks that require a high degree of flexibility and expertise.
  • Mobile Robots: Impact on Supply Chain Management According to the article, some of the advantages of using an RSC include the ability to dump reusable components and emissions during transit, and presence of collection, recovery, recycling, dismantling, and re-manufacturing facilities.
  • Drawing 3D Objects With Use of Robotic Arm The hot end of the printer melts the material and embeds it onto the surface onto the intended surface. The research also utilized the Arduino development board to interface the programs written and the physical […]
  • Robotic Process Automation Implementation Robotics in the tax system is a highly rational, reasonable, and beneficial idea that will help improve the service and make any process more accessible.
  • STEM (Science), Robots, Codes, Maker’s Space Overview Students’ interest in STEM, Robotics, Coding, and Engineering education and professions has been shown to be stimulated by early exposure to STEM knowledge.
  • The Hybrid Robot Vacuum Cleaners The EUFY series of hybrid vacuum cleaners is one of the most popular choices in the market, and the company offers products in various pricing ranges. In the context of hybrid robot vacuum cleaners, market […]
  • Robotics and Related Social & Political Problems The combination of engineering and computer science has aided people in developing the field of robotics. The social impact of robotics lies in the problems that robots are designed to solve.
  • Hyper Evolution: The Rise of the Robots From the video, the robots look like real human beings, and they have been capacitated to act in a human way in what is known as machine learning technology powered by artificial intelligence. Hyper evolution […]
  • Amazon’s AI-Powered Home Robots The objective of the present plan is to provide a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the introduction of AI-powered home robots as Amazon’s next disruptive customer product.
  • Robots on the Battlefield: Benefits vs. Constraints The principal obstacle to the introduction of robots on the battlefield is related to the impossibility of operating in the current environment.
  • Robotic Snowblower’s Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning Strategy For success, a business needs to conduct a structured analysis of the market and competitors, segment consumers into narrow groups, assess the market’s attractiveness, and correctly position the brand.
  • Robot Revolution in the Contemporary Society The lack of human resources in the middle of the 20th century and the development of industrial technologies led to the appearance of robots.
  • Healthcare Robots: Entering the Era of a Technological Breakthrough However, using robots as medical doctors’ assistants has been only a figment of the most daring dreams until recently.
  • “A Robot Can Be Warehouse Worker’s Pal” by Jennifer Smith Employees working alongside the robots are guided adequately. This method makes it possible for companies to achieve their objectives in a timely manner.
  • Boston Dynamics’ Spot Robot Dog Spot is a four-legged robot that evolved from SpotMini (the initial version) that offers multiple capabilities of operation, including climbing, jumping, walking.
  • Robotics and Artificial Intelligence in Organizations Otherwise, cognitively complex tasks and those demanding emotional intelligence will be performed by humans, with the support of robotics and AI. Therefore, this study speaks of the importance of employee trust in AI and organization.
  • Disinfecting Robots: Care Ethics, and Design Thus, the utilization of this technology may be expected to reduce the incidence rate of HAIs. However, it is essential to consider the cost of this technology and reimbursement as they may be key factors […]
  • Robot Interaction Language (ROILA) and Robot Creativity The difference of ROILA from other languages for computing is that it should be simple for both machines and humans to understand.
  • The Personal and Servicing Robotic Market For the product to receive a successful launch, the focus will be placed on the target market and not the product features.
  • Process Description of a Rescue Robot Roboticists in the physical design of rescue robots ensure that the robots can traverse places that are physically unreachable to human rescuers and additionally equip them with a variety of distributed technology that enable them […]
  • The Tactical Throwable Robot The main technical characteristics of the machine are given below in the table offered by Czupryniak Rafal and Trojnazki Maziej in their article “Throwable tactical robot description of construction and performed tests”.
  • Wireless Robotic Car: Servo Motors and DC Motors This section focuses on the review of literature on servo motors and DC motors, in general as well as in the context of the current research project.
  • Using Robots in the Medical Industry Third, the robot surgery further has been observed to increase comfort on the part of the patient as the surgery proceeds, and this results from ergonomic position that the robot assumes as the operation proceeds.
  • Robot Making: Materials for Building and Economic Factor As the science is progressing in recent times, we can be sure that it is a matter of time when we will get some economical alternatives of the materials that are needed to make a […]
  • Autonomous Mobile Robot: GPS and Compass The other realization is that in most instances the challenges presented in the motion of the appendages of a particular robot are not only limited to the number of joints but can significantly exceed the […]
  • Robotics in Construction: Automated and Semi-Automated Devices The robot is fitted with ultrasonic sensors that aid in positioning of the water jet in inclined areas and also the sensors determine the distance of concrete removal.
  • Whats Mean Robotics Welding Epping and Zhang define robotic welding as the utilization of programmable systems and tools that mechanize and automate the way welding is done.
  • Aliens Concept in “I, Robot” by Alex Proyas: Film Analysis The purpose of this paper is to analyze the concept of aliens and its implications in the movie I, Robot. It is possible to state that modern advancements are the reflection of something different from […]
  • Are Robots About to Enter the Healthcare Workforce? Many new technologies must first overcome several obstacles in order to become a part of the service environment, and robots are no exception.
  • The Influence of Robots and AI on Work Relationships In the early 20th century, Taylor’s work focused on production management and labor efficiency, which led to the attention of managers to the problems of selection, the motivation of employees, and their training.
  • Robots in Today’s Society: Artificial Intelligence The most important is the automation of the repeating process, to liberate human power, and avoid mistakes and delays in the processes.
  • Intelligent Transportation Systems: A Robot Project The construction of the robot involved the use of sensors and microchips, accessories also used in ITS technology. The role of the sensors in the robot was to detect obstacles and red light on the […]
  • I, Robot and the Effects of Technology The judgment call is generally made on the quality of life of the humans, with little to no regard for the lifestyle and options available to the robots who have achieved a higher level of […]
  • The Use of Robotics in the Operating Room The da Vinci surgical system is the first and one of the famous Robotics surgical systems used in the operating room.
  • Robotic Visual Recognition and Robotics in Healthcare There are a number of systems and tools are used in order to produce a time-saving and efficient robot. In a number of cases, robots are the extension of a doctor’s skills and also assist […]
  • The Connection Between Science and Technology: The Robotic Fish by Professor HU Furthermore, we discuss the other effects of science in technology and some of the recent technological developments in the rest of the world.
  • Knowledge of Saudi Nurse Managers Towards Robots The main objective of this study is to investigate the attitudes and knowledge of Saudi nurse managers towards the adoption of robotics for remote monitoring and management of elderly patient with chronic illness in an […]
  • 3D Robotics Disrupts the Aviation Industry 3D Robotics describe their business model as perceiving open hardware, drones, and the future of robotics as the part of the community and the company.
  • Robotics. “Humans Need Not Apply” Video Mechanical muscles are more strong and reliable than humans, and the replacement of people by mechanisms in physical work allows society to specialize in intellectual work, develop economics and raise the standards of living.
  • Questionable Future of Robotics In this case, the lecture, which was focusing on the flow of robotics’ development, influenced my perception about the future, robotics’ impact on our lives, and the ability of robots to destroy the humanity.
  • Baxter Robots and Company Performance This technology will impact the performance of companies by reducing the time spent on repetitive duties such as packing. In case my employers buy this robot, I will not be affected personally, but the performance […]
  • Technology: Will Robots Ever Replace Humans? According to the author, one’s intelligence is not being solely concerned with the processing of data in the algorithmic manner, as it happened to be the case with AI it reflects the varying ability of […]
  • Double Robotics Website’s Tracking Strategy The goals of the Doublerobotics.com website are to familiarize audiences with the telepresence industry and to convince both corporate and individual potential customers to purchase a robot.
  • Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation: Article Critique The information about the groups of participants was available to clinicians and study personnel since the only post-stroke individual in the sample needed special procedures to participate.
  • Robotic-Assisted Intervention Effectiveness Modern robots for upper limb training differ in terms of the degrees of freedom, the type of feedback, and the available modes of training.
  • Robotics in Construction Management: Impacts and Barriers The assessment of the economic feasibility of the robotization of individual construction processes is based on cost analysis and the calculation of payback.
  • Robots as a Factor in Unemployment Patterns One of the prevailing arguments in regards to this problem is that the advent of the robot technology is contributing towards a high rate of unemployment.
  • Spot Mini Robot by Boston Dynamics While the bigger robots by Boston Dynamics are designed to operate in extreme conditions, Spot Mini is a household robot, which makes it marketable to a wider community and, therefore, profitable.
  • Rights of ‘Feeling’ Robots and Humans Many futurists believe strongly that new laws will be needed to tame the behaviors and actions of robots. That being the case, autonomous robots might take advantage of their rights to control human beings.
  • Australian Robotics Inc.’s Project Management As such, the measure of success will focus on ascertaining whether or not the project develops a new family of highly flexible, “intelligent” robots that can be used in handling heavy industry tasks.
  • Electronic or Robotic Companions: Business Model The device the usage of which will help to destroy the language bar. The speech of any speaker will be translated and presented to the owner of the device in his/her native language.
  • Robotic Satellites: Implementation Plan and Budget One of the most effective methods of reaching the maximum level of security, not to feel restricted, and reduce spending is the usage of electronic or robotic companions.
  • Robotics’ Sociopolitical and Economic Implications The foremost benefits of Robotics for individuals can be formulated as follows: The continual development/implementation of the Robotics-related technologies will increase the chances of self-actualization, on the part of the potentially affected individuals.
  • Stihl Company and Its Robotics Automation involves the use of robots in the production process. The company’s productivity has come as a result of the automation production practices and its presence across the globe.
  • Will Robots Ever Replace Humans? It is quite peculiar that Bolonkin uses negation in order to stir the audience’s delight; more impressively, the specified approach works the pathos is concealed not in the description of the possibilities, but the compliment […]
  • Welcome Robotic for Abu Dhabi Women College In the year 2009, the college opened a second banch in the city of khalifa to cater for the students who encounter problems relocating to the capital city.
  • Fiat Company: Deployment of Robotics in Manufacturing The technology also enhanced the reduction of production costs by reducing the number of working days without effecting the production and the performance of the company at its peak.
  • Projects “Cyborg” and “New Electrical Apparatus” in Robotics In fact, although Project Cyborg included some medical expertise, the purpose is significantly similar to the project by Nicholson and Carlisle largely because a medical achievement is not one of their aims.
  • Meteorite or Puck Hunt: Autonomous Mobile Robot The Development of the Design Being the first time that we are taking part in this type of competition, we decide to work out a plan that would help us develop the autonomous mobile robot […]
  • Marketing the Wireless Robotic Car By sending the robotic car to a chemical hazard, it is possible to determine the extent of spillage of a liquid or a solid pollutant.
  • A Mobile Robotic Project in the Ohio State University Medical Center In order for the project to be successful there must be a one-to-one contact between those implementing the project and the staff at the hospital.
  • Autonomous Controller Robotics: The Future of Robots The middle level is the Coordination level which interfaces the actions of the top and lower level s in the architecture.
  • How Will Autonomous Robots Change Military Tactics?
  • Will Romantic Relationships Be Formed With Robots?
  • What Were the First Industrial Robots in America Used?
  • Will Robots and Humanoids Take Over the World?
  • Are Robots Beneficial for the Society?
  • Will Robots Automate Your Job Away?
  • Why Not Use Robots to Stabilize Stock Markets?
  • Will Robots Change Our Lives in the Future?
  • How Can Robots Effect Children’s Development?
  • Will Robots Create Economic Utopia?
  • Why Robots Are Start Over the World With Breakthrough Technology?
  • Will Robots Live With Humans in Harmony?
  • Can Humanoid Service Robots Perform Better Than Service Employees?
  • How Can Robots Be Used to Help Students?
  • Will Robots One Day Rule the World?
  • Why Should Robots Not Be Pursued?
  • How Do Robots Impact Careers in the Medical Field?
  • Why Will Robots Always Need Us?
  • Are Robots Taking Control of Human Tasks?
  • How Can Robots Have Human-Like Intelligence?
  • Can Service Robots Hamper Customer Anger and Aggression After a Service Failure?
  • Are Robots the Solution to Equality in the Job Interview Process?
  • How Can Robots Replace 60% of Jobs?
  • Are Sex Robots the Next Big Sexual Revolution?
  • How Can Robots Solve the Problem of Aging Population?
  • Are Surgical Robots the Future of Medicine?
  • How Can Robots Work More Efficient Than Humans?
  • Should Robots Intelligence Becoming Smarter Than Us and Make?
  • What Are Robots and How Are They Being Used Nowadays?
  • Are Robots and Animals More or Less Similar to One Another Than Robots and Humans?
  • Chicago (A-D)
  • Chicago (N-B)

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COMMENTS

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  2. How To Write The GED Essay 2023 (Extended Response)

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  3. How to Write the GED Essay-Topics, Sample, and Tips

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  4. How to Write & Pass a GED Essay

    Here is an example GED essay question: Analyze the arguments presented in the press release and the letter to the editor. In your response, develop an argument in which you explain how one position is better supported than the other. Incorporate relevant and specific evidence from both sources to support your argument.

  5. Extended Response

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  6. PDF Extended Response Answer Guidelines

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    Robotics [GED RLA] 5.0 (1 review) Get a hint. Introduction robotics. Click the card to flip 👆. Lately, the issue of robotic applications has generated a lot of debate. Some people believe that using robots gives more favorable outcomes, while others argue that it has more disadvantages. According to the argument, Michal is better supported ...

  8. 396 GED Essay Topics, Prompts, & Good Ideas

    396 GED Essay Topics, Prompts, & Good Ideas. General Educational Development (GED) essay topics span a broad range of themes intended to test one's comprehension, analytical abilities, and proficiency in written communication. These subjects often delve into prominent social issues, such as climate change, poverty, and racial discrimination ...

  9. GED Essay Question

    The Reasoning Through Language Arts section of the GED includes an "Extended Response" question. This is simply an essay question. You will have 45 minutes to type your answer. This is a tricky part of the GED test, so it's very important to familiarize yourself with this task ahead of time. First read our essay guide and then review our ...

  10. GED Essay: Everything You Need To Know In 2024

    The GED essay is intimidating to many people. Writing an entire essay from scratch in 45 minutes or less may seem difficult, but it does not have to be. This GED essay writing overview will help you prepare for and learn about the written section of the exam.In this post, Get-TestPrep will show everything you need to know about GED essays, including their structure, sample topics, tips, and ...

  11. PDF The ®GED Ready Practice Test Reasoning Through Language Arts (RLA

    The proposal does say that the company AutoCamera Inc. has promised to waive installation fees that would normally run $50,000-$100,000 per intersection. However, that same company will charge us $5,000-$6,000 each month per camera to operate and maintain the cameras. That is at least $60,000 per year for one camera.

  12. Extended Response: Example 1

    Here, at HowtoPasstheGED.com, a five-paragraph essay will be used as a framework for writing an Extended Response. Five-Paragraph Essay - Outline. Paragraph 1: Introduction of your position with three supporting points. Paragraph 2: Discussion of first point. Paragraph 3: Discussion of second point.

  13. GED Essay

    There are is now an extended response (essay) question on the GED Reasoning Through Language Arts Test (RLA). You are given 45 minutes to type your GED Essay on the RLA test. Read through our tips and strategies, use our sample prompt to write out a practice essay, and then examine our essay examples to gauge your strengths and weaknesses. GED.

  14. GED: Writing Test

    Step 3: Write a Clear Statement of Purpose. Your readers will be looking for a clear theme or position that is supported throughout the essay. To state your purpose, take the topic (effects of television) and give an opinion about the topic that you can support with your examples. For instance:

  15. GED Essay-- Tips, Tools, and What to Expect on the 2024 Test

    * You can find more resources on the RLA extended response, including some really good videos, here: https://ged.com/en/curriculum/language_arts/extended_res...

  16. PDF Preparing for the GED Essay

    This section of the book presents a simple strategy for writing a passing GED essay. The GED Language Arts, Writing Test has two parts. Part I, Editing, is a multiple-choice section covering organization, sentence structure, usage, and mechanics. The first part of this book will help you pass Part I of the test.

  17. GED Essay Topics

    GED Essay - Social Studies; GED Short Answer Questions - Science; The essay portion of the GED will require you to compose a short essay on a pre-selected topic. The essay will be either a narrative, descriptive, or persuasive essay. Narrative essays require you to tell a story from your own life. Descriptive essays require you to paint a ...

  18. 70 GED Essay Topics

    The GED, or General Educational Development, is a credential that is awarded to students who choose not to finish high school but still need to prove that they have the skills necessary to place into college-level courses. The GED test is split into four sections: writing, reading, math, and science. Each section is multiple choice save for the ...

  19. GED Sample Essay

    Sample Essay Analysis. This essay is very well-organized. It uses 5 paragraphs and lays out the structure in the following manner: Paragraph 1 — Introduction (why the ACLU position is better-supported) Paragraph 2 — Reason #1 — Statistics (two examples given from passage) Paragraph 3 — Reason #2 — Ethics (one example given from passage)

  20. How to Write The GED Essay in 4 Steps

    In this video, you'll find the ultimate strategy to write the GED essay.If you are about to take the GED Exam to access better colleges or job opportunities,...

  21. GED Extended Response Essay Guide

    The GED Extended Response Essay is persuasive writing, meaning that you are trying to prove a point in your essay. Read the prompt carefully (Analyze) Sample essay prompt: Analyze the arguments presented in the two speeches. In your response, develop an argument in which you explain how one position is better. supported than the other.

  22. 111 Robots Topic Ideas to Write about & Essay Samples

    The recent advancements in robotics and artificial intelligence have the potential to automate a wide range of human activities and to dramatically reshape the way people live and work in the coming decades. We will write. a custom essay specifically for you by our professional experts. 809 writers online.

  23. PDF RLA ER Rubric Trait 1

    Trait 1: Creation of Arguments and Use of Evidence A. 2 generates text-based argument(s) and establishes a purpose that is connected to the prompt. B. cites relevant and specific evidence from source text(s) to support argument (may include few irrelevant pieces of evidence or unsupported claims) C.