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Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

Policy 16_9

Policies and procedures

Lse's policies, procedures, regulations and other essential documents..

While all policies are primarily aimed at staff and students, the majority have been made publicly available to support transparency and good governance.

To add or revise an existing document please contact Dan Bennett ( [email protected] ). Alternative formats are also available on request . 

All School policies are indexed through the LSE search engine. To browse through policies, please use the subject groupings below, or search on the A to Z page . 

A list of policies by document group is available here . 

Competitions and Market Authority (CMA) 

Your Consumer Rights As A Student Student Charter

Staff Disability Policy Student Disability Policy Equity and Diversity Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Strategy Equity and diversity in the public lecture programme Religious observance policy Trans Staff and Students Policy 

Accommodation Policy Air Quality Statement Asbestos Control Policy Asbestos Management Plan Fire Safety Policy  Legionella Policy   Physical security policy  Safe Evacuation of Persons with Disabilities

Arts Policy Code of good practice on free speech  Conflict of Interest Policy Discrimination, Harassement and Bullying Policy Ethics Code External Funding Acceptance Policy External Funding Acceptance Procedure  (formerly Ethical Screening) Fraud and Bribery Policy Gifts and Hospitality Policy and Procedure Informed consent Modern Slavery Statement  Speak Up Policy (formerly Whistleblowing Policy) Supplier Code of Practice

Finance and Planning

Departmental Funding Guidelines Financial Regulations Functional Reviews Procedure Major Academic Initiatives Policy Maternity, adoption or shared parental leave (MASPL) - procedure for cover arrangements Supplier Code of Practice Replacement Teaching Compensation Guidance

Procedures relating to Financial Regulations are available here

Governance and Legal

Academic Annex Advisory Boards Guidance   Alumni Misconduct Procedure   Archives Policy Articles of Association  [for byelaws associated with the Academic Annex, see the separate Academic Annex file] Bribery and Fraud policy Bye Laws Code of good practice on free speech   Code of good practice on department governance Committee Effective Behaviour Statement Conflicts of Interest Policy Contracts guidance Council Committee Standing Order s Council Standing Order s Counselling service confidentiality statement Database Purging Procedure Data Breach Procedure Data controller versus Data Processor   Data protection and contracts Data Protection and Criminal Offences Data Protection and information management Data Protection and research Data Protection of Commercial Research Policy Data Protection Guidance: Anonymisation and Data Protection Research Data Protection Guidance: Anonymisation and Pseudonymisation   Data Protection Guidance: Data Controller Versus Data Processor Data Protection Guidance: Biometric Research Data Policy Data Protection Guidance: Blogging and Data Protection Data Protection Guidance: Clean Up for Outlook folders Data Protection Guidance: Communicating with special categories data subjects Data Protection Guidance: Creating Privacy Notices general Data Protection Guidance: Creating Privacy Notices for Marketing Data Protection Guidance: Data Protection and HR related emails and documents Data Protection Guidance: Data Protection and Contracts Data Protection Guidance: Determining who needs to know about personal data Data Protection Guidance:DfE data Access form Data Protection sections Data Protection Guidance: Email retention and management Data Protection Guidance: Exams and Data Protection  Data Protection Guidance: Handling requests for data from police Data Protection Guidance: Help! I've lost my laptop. Data Protection Guidance: How to apply the Data Protection principles in your work Data Protection Guidance: Managing electronic data deletion Data Protection Guidance: Managing requests for data deletion Data Protection Guidance: Online Survey Retention Data Protection Guidance: Passport Scans and other photo ID Data Protection Guidance: Personal Data on Mobile Devices Data Protection Guidance: Publishing personal data on the website Data Protection Guidance: Research Data Roles for Data Protection Data Protection Guidance: Sending Emails to the Wrong Person Data Protection Guidance: Sharepoint Sites Policy Data Protection Guidance: Social media, data protection and research Data Protection Guidance: Unsuccessful applications policy Data Protection Guidance: Website Takedown Policy Data Protection Guidance: What is confidential information Data Protection Guidance: What is restricted information Data Protection Guidance: When does a request for information become a subject access request Data Protection Guidance: Where you must use FileDrop Data Protection Impact Assessment Policy Data Protection Impact Assessment  [form] Data Protection policy  Destruction of physical records Disciplinary Procedure for students Discrimination, Harassement and Bullying Policy Eligibility For Scholarships By Nationality Email Diversion Procedure File and folder management FOI guide for making requests FOI guide for staff Gender segregation Information Assets and Records Management Policy Information Governance Use of Office365 Managing LSESU requests for M365 stored information Managing Personal Data Off-Campus Marketing events and publications - Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (PECR) Guidance Modern Slavery Statement  Office365 global search procedure Physical Mail Policy Procedure for Considering Allegations of Harassement from Students Against Members of Staff Procedure - Legal Hold Records management policy [See Information Assets and Records Management Policy ] Retention of financial documents Retention of Research Data once Staff have left Retention of unused SharePoint sites  Retention schedule Scheme of Delegation  [Internal Only] Scheme of Delegated Legal Authority Smoking Policy Student Accommodation Disciplinary Code Student Complaints Procedure Student Drugs and Alcohol Policy Student Drugs and Alcohol Procedure Subject Access Request Process and Procedure (GDPR) Supplier Code of Practice

Human Resources

Apprenticeships Policy Academic Annex Academic Staff Reward Committee: Annual Contribution Pay Additional Payments Policy and Procedure Adoption policy Advance payments for Tier 2 applicants Alcohol and drugs policy and procedure Annual Leave Policy (PSS) Annual Performance Review of (Full) Professors Guidelines  Appeals policy and procedure for Academic Support staff British Petroleum (BP) Centennial Professors Scheme Buyout Policy Capability health policy and procedure for academic support staff Capability performance policy and procedure for professional services staff CDR Guidance: Academic, Research, Policy, Teaching and ECT staff who are no longer on probation Core Business in Core Hours Policy Dignity at Work Statement Disciplinary Policy for Professional Services Staff Education Probationary Review Scheme Emeritus Policy Etiquette Policy for Email and other Online Communication Tools Flexible Working Policy and Procedure Frontier Workers Policy Grievance Guidance for the Employment of Graduate Teaching Assistants, Guest Teachers and Emeritus Teachers for departments and staff Guidelines for Promotion of Assistant and Associate Professorial Lecturers Guidelines for Promotion to and within the New Research Staff Career Guidelines for Promotions to Research Officer and Research Fellow Guidelines for Promotion of Assistant and Associate Professors (Education) Immigration Policy LSE Centennial Professors Scheme Maternity, adoption or shared parental leave (MASPL) - procedure for cover arrangements Maternity Managing Staff Changing Role Mentoring Guidance: Academic, Research, Policy, Teaching and ECT staff who are no longer on probation and LSE Fellows (post-doctoral) Named Chairs Policy Organisational Change Policy Overseas Working Policy Parental leave Paternity/ Partner's leave Pay Supplements Policy: Academic Staff Pay Supplements Policy: Professional Services Staff Policy and Procedure on Personal Relationships Policy Fellow Career Track Promotion Policy on the Support for Carers Professionally Qualified Faculty Scheme   Professional Services Grading Policy Professional Services Grading Procedure Professional Services Salaried Staff Recruitment and Selection Policy and Procedure Professional Services Staff Contribution Pay Guidelines Professional Services Staff Starting Salary Policy and Procedure Recruitment and Selection Policy Redeployment Policy and Procedure Relocation Policy Remuneration Policy For Faculty Responsibility allowance Retirement Policy Sabbatical policy Secondment for professional services staff Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence Policy Shared parental leave Single nomination Special Leave Policy  Spotlight Prizes Guideline Transitioning at work: guidance for staff and managers Trans Staff and Student Policy Visiting Appointments Scheme Wellbeing

Information Technology

Access control policy Administrators Code of Practice [Internal] Application control policy  [Internal] Associate Accounts [Internal] Anti-virus software on LSE computers Application to use IT facilities at LSE  Asset management policy [Internal] Associate Accounts  [Internal] Bing Chat Enterprise Usage Guide [Internal] Staff Personal Device Policy [Internal] Centralised Email Deletion [Internal] Cloud Assurance Questions (form) Commissioning Cloud Applications  [Internal] Communications Room Physical Security  [Internal] Compromised Accounts Policy [Internal] Conditions of use of IT facilities at LSE Conditions of use of the residences network Confidential Information Transfer  [Internal] Database Security  [Internal] Database Vendors Data Encryption requirements for end users  [Internal] Electronic Data Retention and Purging Electronic messaging policy  [Internal] Email Address Conventions  [Internal] Email Etiquette Guidance Encrypted Authentication Policy  [Internal] End User Equipment Policy Firewall Ruleset Management Policy  [Internal] Hosting Non-Standard Websites and Internet-facing Services [Internal] Information security classification standard  Information security policy Laptop Hard Drive Encryption  [Internal] Log Retention Policy [Internal] Mail Relay  [Internal] Managing Staff Changing Role  [Internal] Mass Research Survey Policy  [Internal] Minimum Standards  [Internal] Minimum Standards: Device Level Security [Internal] Minimum Standards: Data Processing Outside EEA (Collaborators)  [Internal] Minimum Standards: Data Processing Outside EEA (Consultants)  [Internal] Mobile Device Security Management  [Internal] Monitoring and logging policy  [Internal] Multi-factor Authenticating Policy [Internal] [Under review] Network Connection Policy  [Internal] Office365 Account Deletion Policy Password Policy [Internal] Patch Management  [Internal] Payment Card Gateways  [Internal] PCI-DSS Cardholder Data Environments PCI DSS Compliance Proof of Concepts, Prototypes and Pilots Protocol To Be Followed By DTS In The Event Of The Death Of A Staff or Student [Internal] Remote access policy  [Internal] Server-Side Encryption  [Internal] SharePoint team sites provision  [Internal] Software Version Control [Internal] Technology Resources for Journals  [Internal] Temporary Technology Solutions Use of Multi Factor Authentication (MFA) to protect LSE systems, identities and data [Internal] User accounts policy  [Internal] VPN Access Control Policy [Internal] Vulnerability Management Policy Wireless Device Policy  [Internal]

Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property Policy Intellectual Property Policy FAQ Lecture Recording Policy

Internal Only documents 

Some School documents are only available to staff. 

To access 'Internal Only' documents, click here . 

Citation Guide for the Faculty Information Form Code of Research Conduct Governance of Research  Informed Consent LSE statement on the responsible use of citation metrics Open Access Publications Policy Principles of Authorship Research Data Management Policy Research Data Management Toolkit Research Data Retention Guidance Research Ethics Policy and Procedures LSE Research Exchange (RX) and use of CareerHub Research Grants Policy (The Research Grants Policy has been in full effect from 1 August 2021 and applies partially to awards falling prior to this date but after the suspension of the Research Incentives Policy in June 2020). Research Incentives Policy  (The Research Incentives Policy was suspended in June 2020 and remains active only for eligible legacy projects. It has been replaced by the Research Grants Policy). Research infrastructure and investment funds Research Tools Minimum Standards

Risk and Compliance

Associated entities policy  Bribery and Fraud policy Business continuity policy Business continuity: Major Incident Initial Response Plan (MIIRP) Business continuity: Major Incident Recovery Actions for Academic Departments Business continuity: Serious Communicable / Notifiable Diseases Plan Business continuity: Travel Disruption and Adverse Weather Guidance Business continuity: What To Do In An Emergency Conflicts of Interest Policy Gender segregation Health and safety policy Health and safety procedure: first aid Health and safety procedure: manual handling Health and safety procedure: risk assessment Health and safety procedure: managing display screen equipment Health and safety procedure: training and competence Health and safety procedure: work place safety inspection Overseas Travel Policy Smoking Policy Risk Policy Risk Procedure

Safeguarding

Cause For Concern: Guidance on working with students in difficulty Child Protection and Safeguarding Document for LSE Widening Participation (WP) activities Personal Relationships Policy and Procedure Safeguarding Policy  Safeguarding in Research and International Activities Policy

Student Regulations

Code of good practice on free speech  De-registration guidance  Disciplinary procedure for students  Discrimination, Harassement and Bullying Policy Engagement Monitoring Policy (Taught Students) Fitness To Study Policy Graduate Admissions Policy Graduate Admission Criminal Conviction Policy Interruption of Studies Policy Library Rules  LSESU Relationship and Service Agreement  Research Degrees: for all guidance see here Room booking policy Student Accommodation Disciplinary Code Student charter  Student Complaints Procedure Student drugs and alcohol policy Timetable Policy UG Admissions policy Your Consumer Rights As A Student

Sustainability

Sustainability Policy Sustainability Strategic Plan Energy Policy Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Policy Sustainable Procurement Policy Anti-Slavery Statement LSE Catering and the Environment LSE Travel Plan

beaver 16_9

Calendar For academic regulations and classification schemes relating to programmes of study

Modern slavery statement the school's statement on modern slavery, executive office.

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Ethics Code

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[email protected]

Executive Office, Centre Building 11th Floor, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE

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MSc Regulation

  • Graduate taught
  • Department of Government
  • Application code M3U8
  • Starting 2024
  • Home full-time: Open
  • Home part-time: Open
  • Overseas full-time: Open
  • Location: Houghton Street, London

The MSc Regulation is based in the LSE Law School and the Department of Government and offers you the chance to study regulation within a systematic framework.

Regulatory growth and reform has been an international 'policy boom' in recent years. Governments have increasingly used regulation in preference to other policy instruments. Transnational regulation – often involving a diversity of non-state actors – has become a defining feature of the international economy. Regulation therefore plays a central role in the contemporary understanding of law and public policy. As a field of study, regulation requires a multidisciplinary approach. Legal, political and economic issues are intertwined and each has to be understood to make sense of the overall process.

The programme takes a distinctive multidisciplinary approach, which concentrates on institutional issues and behaviour in regulation – regulatory bureaucracies, interest groups, legislators and courts – in addition to the economic aspects of regulation. We aim to bring together the contrasting North American and European perspectives on regulation, and to juxtapose experience of regulatory practice with theoretical ideas about how regulation works.

Programme details

For more information about tuition fees and entry requirements, see the fees and funding and assessing your application sections.

Entry requirements

Minimum entry requirements for msc regulation.

Upper second class honours degree (2:1) or equivalent in any discipline, and interest in or experience of related areas of law, public administration, politics or economics.

Competition for places at the School is high. This means that even if you meet our minimum entry requirement, this does not guarantee you an offer of admission.

If you have studied or are studying outside of the UK then have a look at our  Information for International Students  to find out the entry requirements that apply to you.

Assessing your application

We welcome applications from all suitably qualified prospective students and want to recruit students with the very best academic merit, potential and motivation, irrespective of their background.

We carefully consider each application on an individual basis, taking into account all the information presented on your application form, including your:

- academic achievement (including predicted and achieved grades) - statement of academic purpose - two academic references - CV

See further information on supporting documents

You may also have to provide evidence of your English proficiency, although you do not need to provide this at the time of your application to LSE.  See our English language requirements .

When to apply

Applications for this programme are considered on a rolling basis, meaning the programme will close once it becomes full. There is no fixed deadline by which you need to apply, however, to be considered for any LSE funding opportunity, you must have submitted your application and all supporting documents by the funding deadline. See the fees and funding section for more details. 

Fees and funding

Every graduate student is charged a fee for their programme.

The fee covers registration and examination fees payable to the School, lectures, classes and individual supervision, lectures given at other colleges under intercollegiate arrangements and, under current arrangements, membership of the Students' Union. It does not cover living costs or travel or fieldwork.

Tuition fees 2024/25 for MSc Regulation

Home students: £27,480 Overseas students: £27,480

The Table of Fees shows the latest tuition amounts for all programmes offered by the School.

The amount of tuition fees you will need to pay, and any financial support you are eligible for, will depend on whether you are classified as a home or overseas student, otherwise known as your fee status. LSE assesses your fee status based on guidelines provided by the Department of Education.

Further information about fee status classification.

Fee reduction

Students who completed undergraduate study at LSE and are beginning taught graduate study at the School are eligible for a  fee reduction  of around 10 per cent of the fee.

Scholarships and other funding

The School recognises that the  cost of living in London  may be higher than in your home town or country, and we provide generous scholarships each year to home and overseas students.

This programme is eligible for needs-based awards from LSE, including the  Graduate Support Scheme ,  Master's Awards , and  Anniversary Scholarships . 

Selection for any funding opportunity is based on receipt of an offer for a place and submitting a Graduate Financial Support application, before the funding deadline. Funding deadline for needs-based awards from LSE:  25 April 2024 .

In addition to our needs-based awards, LSE also makes available scholarships for students from specific regions of the world and awards for students studying specific subject areas.  Find out more about financial support.

Government tuition fee loans and external funding

A postgraduate loan is available from the UK government for eligible students studying for a first master’s programme, to help with fees and living costs. Some other governments and organisations also offer tuition fee loan schemes.

Find out more about tuition fee loans

Further information

Fees and funding opportunities

Information for international students

LSE is an international community, with over 140 nationalities represented amongst its student body. We celebrate this diversity through everything we do.  

If you are applying to LSE from outside of the UK then take a look at our Information for International students . 

1) Take a note of the UK qualifications we require for your programme of interest (found in the ‘Entry requirements’ section of this page). 

2) Go to the International Students section of our website. 

3) Select your country. 

4) Select ‘Graduate entry requirements’ and scroll until you arrive at the information about your local/national qualification. Compare the stated UK entry requirements listed on this page with the local/national entry requirement listed on your country specific page.

Part-time study Part time study is only available for students who do not require a student visa.

Programme structure and courses

You will take a compulsory course on Law and Politics of Regulation and then have the opportunity to specialise through your choice of options and your dissertation topic. If you take two full courses (or equivalent) or a full course and a dissertation in one of the following specialisms: Environmental Regulation, Financial and Commercial Regulation, Social Regulation, Utilities Regulation and Government and Law, you may have this specialism included in your degree title, for example, MSc Regulation (Environmental Regulation).

Law and Politics of Regulation   Provides a central grounding in theories of regulation encountered in legal, political science and law and economics literatures.

Dissertation

Optional courses to the value of two units

To find the most up-to-date list of optional courses please visit the relevant School Calendar page.

You must note, however, that while care has been taken to ensure that this information is up to date and correct, a change of circumstances since publication may cause the School to change, suspend or withdraw a course or programme of study, or change the fees that apply to it. The School will always notify the affected parties as early as practicably possible and propose any viable and relevant alternative options. Note that the School will neither be liable for information that after publication becomes inaccurate or irrelevant, nor for changing, suspending or withdrawing a course or programme of study due to events outside of its control, which includes but is not limited to a lack of demand for a course or programme of study, industrial action, fire, flood or other environmental or physical damage to premises.

You must also note that places are limited on some courses and/or subject to specific entry requirements. The School cannot therefore guarantee you a place. Please note that changes to programmes and courses can sometimes occur after you have accepted your offer of a place. These changes are normally made in light of developments in the discipline or path-breaking research, or on the basis of student feedback. Changes can take the form of altered course content, teaching formats or assessment modes. Any such changes are intended to enhance the student learning experience. You should visit the School’s  Calendar , or contact the relevant academic department, for information on the availability and/or content of courses and programmes of study. Certain substantive changes will be listed on the  updated graduate course and programme information page.

Teaching and assessment

Contact hours and independent study.

The average taught course contact hours per half unit is 20-30 hours and a full unit is 40-60 hours. This includes sessions such as lectures, classes, seminars or workshops, which may include a combination of online and on-campus teaching delivery. Hours vary according to courses and you can view indicative details in the  Calendar  within the Teaching section of each  course guide .

You are also expected to complete independent study outside of class time. This varies depending on the programme, but requires you to manage the majority of your study time yourself, by engaging in activities such as reading, note-taking, thinking and research.

Teaching methods

Teaching staff are leading researchers in the field; several are involved at the highest level in advising government and regulatory agencies. The compulsory course is taught across all members of the MSc Regulation team. You can view indicative details for the teacher responsible for each course in the relevant  course guide . 

There are also regular talks from practitioners in the field to attend as well as seminars and conferences inside and outside the School. The Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation offers many opportunities to take part in leading-edge research.

All taught courses are required to include formative coursework which is unassessed. It is designed to help prepare you for summative assessment which counts towards the course mark and to the degree award. LSE uses a range of formative assessment, such as essays, problem sets, case studies, reports, quizzes, mock exams and many others. Summative assessment may be conducted during the course or by final examination at the end of the course (which in some cases may be offered online). An indication of the formative coursework and summative assessment for each course can be found in the relevant  course guide , which in 2020 took into account the provision of both online and on campus forms of teaching, learning and assessment.

Academic support

You will also be assigned an academic mentor who will be available for guidance and advice on academic or personal concerns.

There are many opportunities to extend your learning outside the classroom and complement your academic studies at LSE.  LSE LIFE  is the School’s centre for academic, personal and professional development. Some of the services on offer include: guidance and hands-on practice of the key skills you will need to do well at LSE: effective reading, academic writing and critical thinking; workshops related to how to adapt to new or difficult situations, including development of skills for leadership, study/work/life balance and preparing for the world of work; and advice and practice on working in study groups and on cross-cultural communication and teamwork.

LSE is committed to enabling all students to achieve their full potential and the School’s  Disability and Wellbeing Service  provides a free, confidential service to all LSE students and is a first point of contact for all disabled students.

Student support and resources

We’re here to help and support you throughout your time at LSE, whether you need help with your academic studies, support with your welfare and wellbeing or simply to develop on a personal and professional level.

Whatever your query, big or small, there are a range of people you can speak to who will be happy to help.  

Department librarians   – they will be able to help you navigate the library and maximise its resources during your studies. 

Accommodation service  – they can offer advice on living in halls and offer guidance on private accommodation related queries.

Class teachers and seminar leaders  – they will be able to assist with queries relating to specific courses. 

Disability and Wellbeing Service  – they are experts in long-term health conditions, sensory impairments, mental health and specific learning difficulties. They offer confidential and free services such as  student counselling,  a  peer support scheme  and arranging  exam adjustments.  They run groups and workshops.  

IT help  – support is available 24 hours a day to assist with all your technology queries.   

LSE Faith Centre  – this is home to LSE's diverse religious activities and transformational interfaith leadership programmes, as well as a space for worship, prayer and quiet reflection. It includes Islamic prayer rooms and a main space for worship. It is also a space for wellbeing classes on campus and is open to all students and staff from all faiths and none.   

Language Centre  – the Centre specialises in offering language courses targeted to the needs of students and practitioners in the social sciences. We offer pre-course English for Academic Purposes programmes; English language support during your studies; modern language courses in nine languages; proofreading, translation and document authentication; and language learning community activities.

LSE Careers  ­ – with the help of LSE Careers, you can make the most of the opportunities that London has to offer. Whatever your career plans, LSE Careers will work with you, connecting you to opportunities and experiences from internships and volunteering to networking events and employer and alumni insights. 

LSE Library   –   founded in 1896, the British Library of Political and Economic Science is the major international library of the social sciences. It stays open late, has lots of excellent resources and is a great place to study. As an LSE student, you’ll have access to a number of other academic libraries in Greater London and nationwide. 

LSE LIFE  – this is where you should go to develop skills you’ll use as a student and beyond. The centre runs talks and workshops on skills you’ll find useful in the classroom; offers one-to-one sessions with study advisers who can help you with reading, making notes, writing, research and exam revision; and provides drop-in sessions for academic and personal support. (See ‘Teaching and assessment’). 

LSE Students’ Union (LSESU)  – they offer academic, personal and financial advice and funding.  

PhD Academy   – this is available for PhD students, wherever they are, to take part in interdisciplinary events and other professional development activities and access all the services related to their registration. 

Sardinia House Dental Practice   – this   offers discounted private dental services to LSE students.  

St Philips Medical Centre  – based in Pethwick-Lawrence House, the Centre provides NHS Primary Care services to registered patients.

Student Services Centre  – our staff here can answer general queries and can point you in the direction of other LSE services.  

Student advisers   – we have a  Deputy Head of Student Services (Advice and Policy)  and an  Adviser to Women Students  who can help with academic and pastoral matters.

Student life

As a student at LSE you’ll be based at our central London campus. Find out what our campus and London have to offer you on academic, social and career perspective. 

Student societies and activities

Your time at LSE is not just about studying, there are plenty of ways to get involved in  extracurricular activities . From joining one of over 200 societies, or starting your own society, to volunteering for a local charity, or attending a public lecture by a world-leading figure, there is a lot to choose from. 

The campus 

LSE is based on one  campus  in the centre of London. Despite the busy feel of the surrounding area, many of the streets around campus are pedestrianised, meaning the campus feels like a real community. 

Life in London 

London is an exciting, vibrant and colourful city. It's also an academic city, with more than 400,000 university students. Whatever your interests or appetite you will find something to suit your palate and pocket in this truly international capital. Make the most of career opportunities and social activities, theatre, museums, music and more. 

Want to find out more? Read why we think  London is a fantastic student city , find out about  key sights, places and experiences for new Londoners . Don't fear, London doesn't have to be super expensive: hear about  London on a budget . 

Preliminary reading

R Baldwin, M Cave and M Lodge Understanding Regulation (Oxford University Press, 2012) M Lodge and K Wegrich, Managing Regulation , (Palgrave, 2012)

Quick Careers Facts for the Department of Government

Median salary of our PG students 15 months after graduating: £34,000          

Top 5 sectors our students work in:

  • Government, Public Sector and Policy   
  • Health and Social Care  
  • Education, Teaching and Research            
  • Information, Digital Technology and Data            
  • Consultancy

The data was collected as part of the Graduate Outcomes survey, which is administered by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). Graduates from 2020-21 were the fourth group to be asked to respond to Graduate Outcomes. Median salaries are calculated for respondents who are paid in UK pounds sterling and who were working in full-time employment

Graduates from the MSc Regulation have gone on to successful careers in politics and government, regulatory bodies, international organisations, law, finance and other regulated services, the media, non-governmental organisations and academia.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme

Enza Iannopollo

MSc Regulation, 2011 Researcher, Forrester Research

EnzaIannopollo170x230

When I came to LSE I was convinced I knew what career path I wanted to follow and that LSE was just another step in this path. However, coming to LSE gave me new options I hadn’t even considered before and opened up lots of new ideas and paths for me. My work involves looking at internet regulation and data protection and the effects this has on technology initiatives in business. As a researcher I am involved in both primary and secondary research and I then use this to write reports, prepare presentations and collaborate with our teams broader projects. I think that being an LSE graduate gives you the freedom to try, and experiment if you wish to do so. 

Support for your career

Many leading organisations give careers presentations at the School during the year, and LSE Careers has a wide range of resources available to assist students in their job search. Find out more about the  support available to students through LSE Careers .

Find out more about LSE

Discover more about being an LSE student - meet us in a city near you, visit our campus or experience LSE from home. 

Experience LSE from home

Webinars, videos, student blogs and student video diaries will help you gain an insight into what it's like to study at LSE for those that aren't able to make it to our campus.  Experience LSE from home . 

Come on a guided campus tour, attend an undergraduate open day, drop into our office or go on a self-guided tour.  Find out about opportunities to visit LSE . 

LSE visits you

Student Marketing, Recruitment and Study Abroad travels throughout the UK and around the world to meet with prospective students. We visit schools, attend education fairs and also hold Destination LSE events: pre-departure events for offer holders.  Find details on LSE's upcoming visits . 

How to apply

Virtual Graduate Open Day

Register your interest

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Catherine Reynolds

September 16th, 2019, phd students: need to work whilst you study.

0 comments | 5 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Should you or shouldn’t you work whilst you study? I hear a number of reasons why LSE PhD students can and can’t work while they are studying.

What’s right for you?

The issues might include:.

  • time – you don’t have enough
  • money – you might need more
  • capacity – how much headspace is available?
  • gaining experience – what sort do you need?

There isn’t a single formula to suit all PhD students, your reasons for doing part-time work are personal, unique and probably multiple. From a career progression perspective, experience matters. Choose wisely how you spend your time and you will gain an advantage in the labour market after your PhD. Connections, references, vocabulary, evidence of relevant success all add value to your portfolio and can be presented positively to future employers. It’s worth getting good quality experience while you study.

Looking at the career paths of PhD students moving into work, I notice a pattern. Those who have managed to gain experience outside academia make a smoother transition to paid work after graduating. LSE regulations guide you to work for no more than 20 hours per week, outside your academic studies and, if you are a funded student, you should check your funder’s specific regulations. That’s fine! Many students manage to fulfil the regulations, complete their PhD and leave with a bank of useful experience.

So, how to get it?

The practicalities.

An internship, paid part-time work, volunteering, a short-term contract all could influence your future career transition. You can get experience through advertised positions and speculative approaches. Focusing on a specific sector will help you find job sites and vacancy boards. Set up feeds from the sites that suit you best.

  • The opportunities on CareerHub are a good starting point.
  • Learn about PhD internships on our Blog.
  • Come and ask if you need some more suggestions.

When applying for any opportunity, address the requirements of the recruiter and use language typical of the organisation and sector to increase your chances of selection success. Translate your PhD experience into terms the selector will recognise and avoid our HE jargon!

Information about supporting yourself funding during a PhD is posted on our PhD Careers website.

All career issues can also be discussed confidentially with me; book a time on CareerHub .

You may feel you’re too busy to add anything else into your weekly schedule but remember the issues addressed at the beginning of this blog. I have examples of other LSE PhD graduates who addressed these concerns and their experience might inspire you. Good luck with your PhD, your additional activities and your work experience!

This blog was written by Catherine Reynolds, PhD and Research Staff Careers Consultant.

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MSc admissions FAQs

Information on the process of application and admission to MSc programmes offered by the Department of Economics - 2024/5 entry.

Applications are processed centrally through the Graduate Admissions Office.

All applicants are advised to read the prospectus pages for our individual MSc programmes starting in 2024/5; these can be accessed via Available programmes  – please click on the relevant programme title/s. 

On this webpage, you will find information about Entry Requirements , the Application Process , what happens After Submitting the Application , Funding and Accommodation , About the Programme , After Completing the MSc Programme and Other Useful Information .

Entry Requirements

1. what are the entry requirements for the msc programmes offered by the department of economics.

Please consult the LSE Graduate Prospectus on the  Available Programmes  page and identify your intended programme. See the “Entry Requirements” section on each prospectus page . You should also consult the general LSE Minimum Entry Requirements  for graduate study.

The programme prospectus for each Taught Masters programme offered by the Department of Economics:

  • L1U1: MSc Economics   (1-year programme)
  • L1U2: MSc Economics   (2-year programme)
  • L1UB: MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics  (1-year programme)

Meeting the minimum entry requirements will not, in itself, guarantee an offer of admission. Please see further guidance below.

2. Am I eligible to apply? 

We advise prospective applicants who have questions about their eligibility to consult the Graduate Prospectus via the  Available Programmes  page. See also  LSE Minimum Entry Requirements .  We regret that we cannot assess candidates prior to receiving a complete formal application which should be submitted to the LSE  Graduate Admissions Office .  It is worth noting that candidates are permitted two programme choices per application; each choice is considered sequentially (not simultaneously) – see FAQ 16 (iv).

3. Which programme is most suitable for my profile?

Applicants should self-assess and are encouraged to read the website and prospectus pages before addressing questions to the Department. If you are unable to find the answer to a specific question after reading the website, you are welcome to contact the Department of Economics graduate admissions team . Note, however, that while our team may offer broad guidance, we will not be able to assess candidate profiles or comment on individual chances of admission.

We expect candidates for the 1-year MSc Economics programme to have previously majored in Economics (or a joint degree with a substantial economics content), having achieved very good grades in economics-relevant modules and demonstrating a solid quantitative background. The 2-year MSc Economics programme is designed for students who have a strong quantitative background but lack the depth of knowledge in economic theory and quantitative techniques which are essential for undertaking the 1-year MSc Economics [see also FAQ 4].  The MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics is a technically rigorous programme suited to candidates with strong results in a quantitative degree. It is primarily aimed at (for example) mathematicians, statisticians, physical scientists, engineers as well as graduate economists.   

See some of the Department of Economics MSc student profiles .  

4. How do I know if I have enough maths for the Department’s MSc programmes?

The Department of Economics MSc programmes are all highly quantitative in content, hence our selectors will be looking for proven strength in quantitative subjects. Applicants to the 1-year MSc Economics are expected to hold a First class honours degree in Economics or equivalent, with a concentration in economics and quantitative subjects. Successful 1-year MSc Economics entrants will typically have achieved very good examination results in university-level two-semester length courses in [a] mathematics (both advanced calculus and linear algebra), [b] econometrics and statistics, [c] intermediate macro and microeconomics.

LSE’s BSc Economics programme regulations provide some indication of the typical academic background of candidates who are admitted to our 1-year MSc Economics; you can also see the Maths and Statistics modules taken by our current LSE BSc Economics students. It is not just a case of having taken some Economics, Maths and Statistics courses; successful entrants will have studied, been examined in, and achieved at least First Class results (at least 70%) in core economics courses that are part of a quantitative-based Economics degree structure, i.e. with standard courses in Intermediate Macroeconomics, Microeconomics and Econometrics which then become the foundation to study - and obtain strong results - in a number of advanced courses.

Candidates who have an insufficient economics background for our 1-year MSc Economics often apply to our 2-year MSc Economics for which the entry requirement is a first class degree, or equivalent, with at least two semesters of university level maths equivalent to that taken by LSE BSc Economics students. Strong results in all quantitative modules will be expected. 

LSE’s BSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics programme regulations provide some indication of the typical academic profile of candidates who, having achieved First Class results, are admitted to our MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics.

Application Process                                                             

5. how do i apply.

We have a formal application process, which is centrally administered by the LSE Graduate Admissions Office. Applicants must submit a complete formal application to the Graduate Admissions Office via the online form. Please read Graduate Admissions’ description of  The Admissions Process . The online application form and links to other required application information are on the  Prospective Students  page. See  How To Apply  and guidance on  Supporting Documents .

6. Where can I get help with the application process?

We encourage you to explore the full range of Graduate Admissions guidance on their  Graduate Knowledge Base  - if you do not find the answer to your question there, please follow the “ I Need Help ” link which allows you to contact the Graduate Admissions Office by email or Live Chat.   

Please note that questions about the mechanics of the application process should be submitted to the LSE central Graduate Admissions Office (rather than to the Department of Economics). See how you can  Contact Graduate Admissions .  

7. When should I submit my application?

Early application is always advised. See  When to Apply / Deadlines . On Graduate Admissions'  Available Programmes  webpage, the availability status of individual programmes - i.e.  Open / Limited Availability / Closed - will be displayed throughout the admissions cycle.

For MSc programmes offered by the Department of Economics, we operate a rolling admissions process, i.e. there is no specific application deadline and each MSc programme will close when it becomes full (NB: there may be a brief window of time as a programme begins to approach capacity, when the programme status may show as “Limited Availability” but sometimes a programme may transition directly from “Open” to “Closed” status). We regret that it is not possible to predict exactly when a programme will close, hence early application is always advisable. 

8. What should my application include?

Our academic selectors wish to get a full picture of your academic profile when they read your application. They will want to see all the modules you have studied/ are studying (in your main degree as well as any other courses such as exchange programmes/summer courses/non-degree courses). 

The selectors will want to see your modules with results as well as modules where results are still pending.  If any module results are still pending, you should still include those module names in your application - either listed within the transcript or in a separate university-generated document (e.g. screen-shot of your university account).  Along with your degree results, other relevant elements of your application will also be considered by our academic selectors, using a holistic and contextual approach.

Your formal application should consist of:

-   Transcripts for all (degree and non-degree) study which makes up your academic profile. This includes relevant exchange / summer-school / non-degree transcripts. [UoLIP students please see note below**]

-   A list of all Pending modules (if any);  if pending modules are not listed on your transcript, please include (for e.g) a screen-shot of your university account listing those pending modules.

-   Statement of academic purpose

-   Two academic references [also see FAQ 9]

-   CV

-   GRE scores (see advice further below)

-   Evidence of your command of English, if required. See  English language requirements . 

-   The appropriate  application/administrative assessment fee

** Students or graduates of the University of London International Programmes  (UoLIP) should state "UoLIP" (and not the host institution) as their Institution in the application form. This is irrespective of whether their degree is studied online or at a local teaching centre. This includes UoLIP students undertaking study under LSE academic direction. 

All UoLIP students should submit transcripts issued only by UoLIP - please use this guidance . We are unable to accept transcripts issued by local host institutions. 

All applicants should read Graduate Admissions’ detailed guidance regarding Supporting Documents .

9. Can I submit a third reference?

 The LSE online application system is set up to accept only two references, and we typically do not allow a candidate to submit a third reference unless the academic selectors request it. 

We encourage candidates to use their good judgement to approach two referees who will write the most detailed and relevant letters, to support their candidacy.

If you have exceptional reason for submitting a third reference please consult the admissions team at [email protected]

10. Do I need a GRE (Graduate Record Examination)?

See the prospectus “Entry Requirements” for each MSc programme offered by the Department of Economics: 

  • L1U1: MSc Economics   (1-year programme)
  • L1U2: MSc Economics (2-year programme)

Note that each programme has its own particular GRE requirements.

Applicants may be exempt from submitting GRE scores if they meet very specific criteria - for more details on programme-specific criteria for GRE exemption, see   Graduate Admissions guidance on GRE , including section on “Exceptions” . Where an applicant may claim exemption from submitting GRE scores, the Department reserves the right to request such scores if our academic selectors deem it necessary to make a final decision on the application. 

11. What else can you tell me about the GRE?

-  You should take the GRE General Test (you are not required to take the GRE Subject Test).

-   You should arrange for the Educational Testing Service (ETS) to send official scores to the LSE Graduate Admissions Office. See  GRE > How to send us your scores .

-   Your test scores should be less than five years old on 1 October 2024. 

-   MSc Economics (1-year and 2-year programme): we typically expect candidates to score at least 161 in the quantitative section of the test.

-   MSc Econometrics & Mathematical Economics: we typically expect candidates to score over 163 in the quantitative section of the test.

-   A higher score will count in your favour, but other information, such as examination results and references will also matter in the overall evaluation. We recognise that if your first language is not English, the verbal test will be more demanding and we view your score on that basis.

-   The Department cannot accept GMAT scores in substitute for the GRE.

-   For details of how to take the GRE General Test, see the  ETS website .

-   The Department of Economics will accept scores from the GRE General Test taken at home . If you cannot access a test centre, you shoud consider taking this Home test rather than claiming a GRE exemption. 

-   The GRE has three sections: Verbal, Quantitative, Analytical. You should include your test scores in the relevant section of the application form, stating the full and percentile scores obtained for  all three sections  of the test. Scores submitted for each section must be from the test taken in one sitting , ie: not across multiple test dates.

-   You are unlikely to score well if you take the test without preparing for it. It is advisable to familiarise yourself with the format of the test and the type of questions it asks, and practise answering sample GRE test questions within the time allowed before you take the test. See the section on how to prepare for the GRE General Test . 

12. Do I need to submit an English Language test? What score is required?

You are not required to submit English test scores at the point of application (although it is strongly recommended that you do so). If you are offered admission to an LSE programme, then proof of your English proficiency may be requested at that point. See Graduate Admissions’ detailed guidance on English Language Requirements for clarification on accepted tests and required scores.

13. If I am still undertaking a degree, can I apply to your MSc? Do I need to submit a transcript?

Many of our candidates are in the final year of a degree programme when they apply so can only supply an interim transcript. This is acceptable, although applicants must be in a position to supply final results (for individual modules as well as overall degree result) and proof of their degree award by the date of MSc registration. When reviewing your application, the Department’s academic selectors expect to see a transcript showing the full list of modules which will contribute to the award of your final qualification. Occasionally, if making an offer, selectors may sometimes set specific grade conditions on certain pending modules.

In case you have no transcript available for an ongoing course of study when submitting your application, the LSE online system allows you to upload a document where you may state that no transcript is yet available. It is, however, important, even in such cases, that you upload  a list of all modules – past, current and future – which will contribute to the award of your current qualification.  The information should include full module titles and module codes.  Where module results are already available, a transcript with the results must be included with the application. Where module exams are yet to be taken or results are still pending, a list of those modules showing full titles and codes should be submitted - the Department may accept a screen-shot/scan from your university account for application review purposes.

Applicants undertaking summer/exchange programmes at another university should include a separate transcript for such programmes/courses.

14. Some module titles on my transcript may not accurately reflect the actual content of the module I am studying. Can I submit additional clarification?

Yes. Candidates may include relevant syllabi and/or an additional note highlighting their coverage of the Economics core subjects and/or their study of quantitative topics. Candidates may combine this extra information into a single pdf and upload it with their main application. NB: Multiple document uploads are not technically permitted. 

It is worth remembering that academic referees often provide useful detail about individual courses - and the student's performance in the same - in their reference letters (candidates may wish to discuss this with their referees). All applications will be reviewed contextually; our academic selectors will review all the information on file to assess every applicant’s quantitative skills and potential to cope with the technical rigour of the specific MSc course/s to which the candidate has applied.

15. Should my application include a diversity statement?

LSE is committed to building a diverse, equitable and truly inclusive university, a vision the Department of Economics fully supports. We believe strongly in expanding the diversity of our graduate student body and invite you to share your experiences, values, perspectives, and/or activities that shape you as a Masters candidate and align with these commitments, as part of your statement of academic purpose.

Should a candidate submit diversity considerations as part of their statement of academic purpose the information provided will help our academic selectors to contextualise the application; however, it will not play a part in assessing a candidate’s suitability for our Masters programmes.

After submitting the Application

16. what happens when i press “submit”.

(i)  Your application will be received by the central Graduate Admissions Office , who provide the School’s admissions service.

At this point, your application will be checked by central Graduate Admissions to ensure all necessary components have been supplied. Neglecting to send complete information with your application will result in delays. If any missing information is identified, you will be contacted and requested to submit the requested material. Upon all items being checked and approved by central Graduate Admissions, your application will be released to the Department of Economics for academic review.

(ii)  Receipt of application to the Department of Economics

When the Department receives your complete application, the contents of your application will be checked again by the Department of Economics’ admissions team to ensure that all items on file meet the specific requirements of our academic selectors, for reviewing purposes. If the team identify missing/contradictory information – eg. no transcript to account for a qualification listed in your application form or a missing Exchange programme transcript – your file will be sent back to central Graduate Admissions who may contact you to request clarification/any missing information.  

(iii)  Academic review and consideration for choice(s)

Once the Department deems that your file is ready for academic review, we will send your application to our academic selectors. Our selectors are highly experienced in screening applications from all over the world; we have regional specialists who are familiar with international academic assessment systems. They will consider all factors when reviewing an application. Applicants who wish to provide relevant background information/commentary for the attention of our selectors may do so via their Statement of Purpose or an additional note submitted with their application (see FAQs 14 and 15). We endeavour to make decisions within eight weeks of the Department receiving your application. However, in busy periods the decision period may be longer.

(iv)  Decision

All decisions are communicated to the applicant by central Graduate Admissions.  Departmental offer recommendations are subject to mandatory checks by the Graduate Admissions Office before the formal offer can be communicated to the applicant. The decision will be visible in the applicant's tracker via their Graduate Applicant Portal (GAP) account. However, the decision is normally deemed final only when formal notification of the decision is sent by email from Graduate Admissions - see also FAQ 18. 

Applicants are offered places at LSE based on a fair and equitable assessment of what they have achieved academically, compared with their peers, and on their own merit.

Applications are considered sequentially not simultaneously. If you submitted your application listing two programme choices, you will initially receive a decision for your first programme choice. Applicants are only considered for their second programme choice if unsuccessful for their first choice. In exceptional cases, applicants holding an offer for their first programme choice, may request to be considered for their second choice, including reasons for their request. 

17. How can I check on the progress of my application?

Use the  Graduate Applicant Portal (GAP) . Applicants should also check Graduate Admissions’ current processing times . 

18. How will I get the final decision on my application?

The Graduate Admissions Office will write to you. A decision will be visible in your  Graduate Applicant Portal (GAP) account once it is entered in the LSE system; however, offers go through a further manual double-check before becoming absolutely final. Hence a decision is authoritative and official only if it has been sent to you in writing - by email - from the Graduate Admissions Office. 

See  The Admissions Process .

19. What happens if I do not meet the conditions of my offer?

You will not be rejected automatically!  If your academic results do not meet the specified offer conditions, you may submit all relevant documents to the Graduate Admissions Office – this includes your final transcripts and – if you wish - a supporting letter from your teacher and/or an official university letter detailing any mitigating circumstances.  Your results and all supporting documents will be sent to our Department for a final review by our academic selectors – the final decision lies with them and cannot, obviously be guaranteed.  The Graduate Admissions Office will then advise you of the final decision, in writing, by email. 

If the condition you have not met is the English language requirement , you should arrange to re-take the test as soon as possible before registration. 

Funding and Accommodation

20. what does it cost to study at lse.

See the Graduate Admissions’ Fees and Funding page for information on tuition fee amounts, fee status classification, fee reductions as well as living costs. This page also provides guidance on funding for Taught Master’s programmes.

Tuition fee amounts for individual programmes are stated in the Table of Fees – please ensure you check the relevant academic year.

21. Can I get funding?

See the Graduate Admissions’ Fees and Funding page for advice on funding for MSc programmes. 

After you submit your application, you will be allocated your  Graduate Applicant Portal (GAP) account which will include a link to the online application form for the LSE Graduate Support Scheme .

Please note that MSc funding is decided centrally and does not fall within the jurisdiction of the Department.

22. How do I apply for accommodation?

Visit the  Accommodation  office web pages for information on types and availability of accommodation as well as guidance on how to apply for a place in LSE halls of residence.

About the Programme

23. where can i see the structure and courses of each programme what about the teaching delivery.

See the individual prospectus page for each MSc programme – section “ Programme structure and courses” .

  • L1U2: MSc Economics   (2-year programme)

Also see the LSE A cademic Calendar for all Taught Masters at LSE, where clicking on “Programme Regulations” and “Graduate Course Guides” will give you detailed insight into the topics covered in each programme of study.

See also LSE's  Teaching Methods .

24. Can I study the MSc part-time?

Our MSc programmes are offered only on a full-time basis. Applicants are welcome to identify suitable part-time LSE programmes via the Search Courses page. Also see the University of London International Programmes as well as details about LSE Executive Education programmes and the LSE Summer School .  LSE also offers short Online Certificate Courses . 

25. Is it possible to transfer credit from graduate level courses in Economics at my institution to the LSE MSc programmes?

LSE is unable to accept credit transfers to its graduate programmes, from any other institutions. There is no possibility for your formative studies to be mapped on to the courses of any of our taught graduate programmes. Please refer to the current LSE Programme Regulations . Also see information about the “ Bologna Process ” under “Types of Study”.

26. Is it possible for MSc students to work as research assistant to Economics faculty or in research centres?

Research Assistant (RA) roles may be available in the Department on an ad-hoc basis but tend to be allocated primarily to our PhD students. RA opportunities are, however, sometimes circulated in the Department by the MSc Tutor. Additionally, MSc students may get in direct contact with faculty who are working in their specific field of interest to find out whether there are research opportunities. If/when considering taking up a RA role, students should remember that the MSc programme is intensive, fast-paced and challenging, with a demanding timetable of taught courses.

See our Faculty Research pages and information about Economics Research Centres . 

27. Are there any compulsory Pre- or Post- sessional courses as part of the MSc Programmes?

Yes.  Each MSc programme has different compulsory course requirements at the start and/or end of the academic year.  These pre/post sessional courses aim to equip students with the key concepts and techniques required to prepare them for their next phase of MSc study.   

  • MSc Economics students take EC400 : Introductory course in Mathematics and Statistics, starting in late August/early September.  This is a 3-week non-credit course of teaching, followed by exams.
  • MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics students take EC451 : a special Introductory course for MSc EME, covering core Economics topics.  Starts in late August/early September.  This is a 3-week non-credit course of teaching, followed by exams.
  • MSc Economics (2-year) students will be required to take the pre-sessional non-credit course - EC2A0 : Introductory Course in Microeconomic Principles in early September before the main first year teaching programme starts. Additionally, at the end of their Preliminary Year (in late August/early September), they undertake a post-sessional course -   EC400 : Introductory course in Mathematics and Statistics - a 3-week non-credit course of teaching, followed by exams.  

28. I have a question about the programme content/structure which is not answered on the website. Who can I contact with my query?

Applicants are encouraged to do detailed research on our website in order to find the required information. If you still have a specific question about the actual programme content or structure, you may contact the Department of Economics programmes team . If you have already been allocated an Applicant ID number by that time, please state it - along with your full name - in the subject header of your email. 

After completing the MSc programme

29. where do the department’s msc students go after graduation.

Our MSc is a long-standing and prestigious degree, highly regarded by employers and by academic departments across the world. In recent years, our graduates have gained employment in leading investment banks (like Goldman Sachs, Bank of America etc), consulting firms (like McKinsey, BCG etc), international organisations (like the IMF, World Bank etc) as well as in the public sector. The overriding reason for our strong placement record is that we train our MSc students to think deeply and rigorously about economic problems, imparting technical skills that are highly prized by employers across the board. The advanced and technically rigorous nature of the MSc programmes also serves as an excellent foundation for PhD programmes and other research-focused roles. See some of the Department of Economics MSc Alumni Profiles as well as the LSE’s  Careers Service website. In exploring “ What do LSE graduates do? ” you can filter on Department and Degree to obtain more specific information on graduate destinations of our MSc students. You can also explore learning opportunities beyond the classroom with LSE Student Futures . 

30. Are the Department’s MSc programmes a suitable route to top PhD programmes?

Yes, the advanced and technically rigorous nature of all the Department’s MSc programmes mean that our graduates have excellent preparation for progressing on to top PhD programmes, in the US and across the world, e.g. MIT, Princeton, Stanford, Chicago to name but a few. Our MSc programmes are also designed to prepare students for LSE’s own MRes/PhD in Economics .

31. Can I progress from the MSc Economics or MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics to the MRes/PhD Economics programme?

There will no longer be automatic and direct progression from any LSE programme into our MRes/PhD Economics from the 2024/5 academic cycle.  Students registering on an MSc in our Department of Economics, who wish to continue on to our MRes/PhD Economics after MSc graduation, will need to submit a standard full application package by the deadline published in the MRes/PhD Economics prospectus .  All applicants - including LSE students - will be given equal consideration, as part of the MRes/PhD Economics' standard process for admission as well as funding. 

Other useful information

32. where can i find information for international students.

See LSE information for  International Students  which provides “Country-specific information” as well as advice on  Visas & Immigration and guidance for applicants who are Refugees, Forced Migrants or Displaced Students .

33. Can I contact faculty or current students during the application process?

We regret that LSE faculty members and current students are unable to answer queries from prospective applicants. Instead we ask applicants to contact the Department of Economics admissions team  with specific concerns which may not be addressed by our webpages. Applicants who receive an offer from LSE will have some opportunity to communicate with nominated student ambassadors within the Department during the period leading up to MSc registration.

34. What if I need further information and advice?

In the first instance, please read the above FAQs and/or the Department of Economics webpages. If you cannot find the answer…

  • If your query is about entry requirements for our MSc programmes , please  contact the Department of Economics admissions team .  Please note that we are not able to provide an informal assessment or comment on suitability of academic profile / chances of admission .
  • If your query is about the MSc programme content/structure , please contact the Department of Economics programmes team .
  • If your query is about funding your MSc study, please read the  Fees and Funding page or contact the Financial Support Office .

If your query is about the logistics of submitting an application / supporting documents, please search for the answer first on the  Graduate Knowledge Base  where you can also follow the “ I Need Help ” link to contact the Graduate Admissions Office by email or Live Chat.  You may also  contact Graduate Admissions .

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Vitale, David Anthony (2018) Political trust and the enforcement of constitutional social rights. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wu, Aaron (2018) Sustaining international law: history, nature, and the politics of global ordering. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Sutton, Rebecca (2018) The international humanitarian actor as 'civilian plus': the circulation of the idea of distinction in international law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Larsen, Signe (2018) The European Union as a federation: a constitutional analysis. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bronsther, Jacob (2018) Long-term incarceration and the moral limits of punishment. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Krever, Tor (2018) The ideological origins of piracy in international legal thought. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Way, Sally-Anne (2018) Human rights from the Great Depression to the Great Recession: the United States, economic liberalism and the shaping of economic and social rights in international law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Leader, Kathryn (2017) Fifteen stories: litigants in person in the civil justice sytem. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Oghenevo Ovie Akpomiemie, Michael (2017) The social context of business and the tax system in Nigeria: the persistence of corruption. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Liberman, Dvora (2017) Custodians of continuity in an era of change: an oral history of the everyday lives of Crown Court clerks between 1972 and 2015. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Keenan, Bernard (2017) Interception: law, media, and techniques. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Živković, Velimir (2017) International investment protection and the national rule of law: a normative framework for a new approach. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Zeffert, Henrietta (2017) Home and international law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Witney, Simon (2017) The corporate governance of private equity-backed companies. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Zhu, Sally Shinan (2017) Law embodied: re-imagining a material legal normativity. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Chauhan, Apurv (2016) Developing a social psychology of poverty: social objects and dialogical representations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Tschorne Venegas, Samuel (2016) The theoretical turn in British public law scholarship. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wang, Chieh (2016) Sexuality, gender, justice and law: rethinking normative heterosexuality and sexual justice from the perspectives of queer humanist men and masculinities studies. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

O’Loughlin, Ailbhe (2016) Balancing rights? Dangerous offenders with severe personality disorders, the public, and the promise of rehabilitation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Burton, Marie (2015) Calling for justice: comparing telephone and face-to-face advice in social welfare legal aid. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Burke, Jarleth (2015) A market and government failure critique of services of general economic interest: testing the centrality and strictness of article 106(2) TFEU. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Stern, Orly (2015) The principle of distinction and women in conflicts in Africa. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Chadwick, Anna (2015) Food commodity speculation, hunger, and the global food crisis: whither regulation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Saab, Anne (2015) A legal inquiry into hunger and climate change: climate-ready seeds in the neoliberal food regime. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Zaccaria, Elena (2015) Proprietary rights in indirectly held securities: legal risks and future challenges. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Willcox, Susannah (2015) Climate change inundation and Atoll Island States: implications for human rights, self-determination and statehood. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

King, Saskia (2015) Agreements that restrict competition by object under Article 101(1) TFEU: past, present and future. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Zhang, Zhanwei (2015) Law, state and society in the PRC: a case study of family planning regulations implementation at grassroots level in rural China. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Agnew, Sinéad (2015) What we talk about when we talk about conscience: the meaning and function of conscience in commercial law doctrine. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Yoshida, Keina (2015) The cinematic jurisprudence of gender crimes: the ICTY and film. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Knight, Dean (2014) Vigilance and restraint in the common law of judicial review: scope, grounds, intensity, context. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

McGaughey, Ewan (2014) Participation in corporate governance. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Xiao, Yin (2014) Analysing the enforcement dimension of regulatory competition: a cultural institutionalist approach. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Knox, Robert (2014) A Critical Examination of the Concept of Imperialism in Marxist and Third World Approaches to International Law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Meerovitch, Vladimir (2014) Investor protection and equity markets: an evaluation of private enforcement of related party transactions rules in Russia. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pearson, Megan Rebecca (2014) Religious objections to equality laws: reconciling religious freedom with gay rights. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Roznai, Yaniv (2014) Unconstitutional constitutional amendments: a study of the nature and limits of constitutional amendment powers. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

O'Regan, Karla Maureen (2014) Beyond illusion: a juridical genealogy of consent in criminal and medical law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Searl, Mark (2014) A normative theory of international law based on new natural law theory. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Coverdale, Helen (2013) Punishing with care: treating offenders as equal persons in criminal punishment. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Lamp, Nicolas (2013) Lawmaking in the multilateral trading system. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Perrone, Nicolas (2013) The international investment regime and foreign investors' rights: another view of a popular story. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wei Liang Wang, Daniel (2013) Can litigation promote fairness in healthcare? The judicial review of rationing decisions in Brazil and England. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Majinge, Charles Riziki (2013) The United Nations, the African Union and the rule of law in Southern Sudan. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Gallo, Zelia (2013) The penality of politics, penality in contemporary Italy 1970-2000. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Jacques, Johanna (2013) From nomos to Hegung: war captivity and international order. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Manea, Sabina (2013) Instrumentalising property: an analysis of rights in the EU emissions trading system. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Yazdani, Shahid (2012) Emergency safeguard; WTO and the feasibility of emergency safeguard measures under the general agreement on trade in services. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Lucey, Mary Catherine (2012) The interface between competition law and the restraint of trade doctrine for professionals: understanding the evolution of problems and proposing solutions for courts in England and Wales. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Grušić, Uglješa (2012) The international employment contract: ideal, reality and regulatory function of European private international law of employment. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ali, Perveen (2012) States in crisis: sovereignty, humanitarianism, and refugee protection in the aftermath of the 2003 Iraq War. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dille, Benjamin B. (2012) Ill fares the land: the legal consequences of land confiscations by the Sandinista government of Nicaragua 1979-1990. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ho, Chih-Hsing (2012) Socio-legal perspectives on biobanking: the case of Taiwan. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Viterbo, Hedi (2012) The legal construction of childhood in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

De Witte, Floris (2012) EU law and the question of justice. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Spangler, Timothy (2012) Overcoming the governance challenge in private investment funds through the enrolment of private monitoring solutions. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Sasso, Lorenzo (2012) Capital structure and corporate governance: the role of hybrid financial instruments. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Boukli, Paraskevi (2012) Imaginary penalities: reconsidering anti-trafficking discourses and technologies. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Gandrud, Christopher (2012) Knowing the unknowns: financial policymaking in uncertainty. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Laidlaw, Emily (2012) Internet gatekeepers, human rights and corporate social responsibilities. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Barroso, Luis (2011) The problems and the controls of the new administrative state of the EU. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Zhu, Chenwei (2011) Authoring collaborative projects: a study of intellectual property and free and open source software (FOSS) licensing schemes from a relational contract perspective. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Nwosu, Udoka (2011) Head of state immunity in international law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ronnen, Edite (2011) Mediation in a conflict society: an ethnographic view on mediation processes in Israel. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Meyers, Jeffrey B. (2011) Toward a Negri-inspired theory of c/Constitution: a contemporary Canadian case study. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kotsakis, Andreas (2011) The biological diversity complex: a history of environmental government. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Stergiou, Vasiliki (2011) The complex relationship of concentrated ownership structures and corporate governance. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dias Soares, Claudia A. (2011) The design features of environmental taxes. MPhil thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Calich, Isabel (2011) The impact of globalisation on the position of developing countries in the international tax system. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hood, Benjamin David (2011) What model for regulating employee discipline and grievances most effectively supports the policy objective of partnership at work and enhanced competitiveness? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Li, Guoming (2011) The constitutional relationship between China and Hong Kong: a study of the status of Hong Kong in China’s system of government under the principle of ‘one Country, two systems’. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

John, Mathew (2011) Rethinking the secular state: perspectives on constitutional law in post-colonial India. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bernal, Paul Alexander (2011) Do deficiencies in data privacy threaten our autonomy and if so, can informational privacy rights meet this threat? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pandya, Abhijit P.G. (2011) Interpretations and coherence of the fair and equitable treatment standard in investment treaty arbitration. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Thiratayakinant, Kraijakr Ley (2010) Multilateral supervision of regional trade agreements: Developing countries' perspectives. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kapotas, Panos (2010) Positive action as a means to achieve full and effective equality in Europe. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Evans, E. Christine (2010) Right to reparations in international law for victims of armed conflict: Convergence of law and practice? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Correia, Miguel G (2010) Taxation of corporate groups under a corporation income tax: An interdisciplinary and comparative tax law analysis. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pappas, Demetra M (2010) The politics of euthanasia and assisted suicide: A comparative case study of emerging criminal law and the criminal trials of Jack 'Dr. Death' Kevorkian. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Brady, Alan David Patrick (2009) A structural, institutionally sensitive model of proportionality and deference under the Human Rights Act 1998. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Franey, Elizabeth Helen (2009) Immunity, individuals and international law: which individuals are immune from the jurisdiction of national courts under international law? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Al-Ramahi, Aseel (2009) Competing rationalities: The evolution of arbitration in commercial disputes in modern Jordan. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Upton, John Dominic (2009) Constitutional thought of Joseph de Maistre. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Brilman, Marina C (2009) Georges Canguilhem: Norms and knowledge in the life sciences. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Minto, Indianna Deborah (2009) Incumbent response to telecommunications reform: The cases of Jamaica and Ireland, 1982-2007. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Heathcote, Gina (2009) Justifying force: A feminist analysis of the international law on the use of force. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Xu, Ting (2009) Property rights, governance and socio-economic transformation: the revival of private property and its limits in post-Mao China. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Roberts, Stephanie (2009) The decision making process of appeals against conviction in the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division). PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Andreicheva, Natalia (2009) The role of legal capital rules in creditor protection: Contrasting the demands of western market economies with Ukraine's transitional economy. MPhil thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mundis, Daryl (2008) The law of naval exclusion zones. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Yong, Benjamin (2008) Becoming national: Contextualising the construction of the New Zealand nation-state. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Reynolds, Michael Paul (2008) Caseflow management: A rudimentary referee process, 1919-1970. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mettraux, Guenael (2008) Command responsibility in international law---the boundaries of criminal liability for military commanders and civilian leaders. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Shim, Jaejin (2008) Equality or the right to work? Explanation and justification of anti-discrimination rights in employment. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Webb, Charlie Edward James (2008) Property, unjust enrichment and restitution. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kulovesi, Kati (2008) The WTO dispute settlement system and the challenge of environment and legitimacy. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dinniss, Heather Harrison (2008) The status and use of computer network attacks in international humanitarian law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Fasan, Oluseto (2007) Compliance with WTO law in developing countries: A study of South Africa and Nigeria. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Khasawneh, Bisher Hani (2007) An appraisal of the right of return and compensation of Jordanian nationals of Palestinian refugee origin and Jordan's right, under international law, to bring claims relating thereto, on their behalf to and against Israel and to seek compensation as a host state in light of the conclusion of the Jordan-Israel peace treaty of 1994. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Amodu, Tola (2007) The transformation of planning agreements as regulatory instruments in land-use planning in the twentieth century. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Panijpan, Kris (2006) Market dynamics in corporate governance: Lessons from recent developments in English law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Park, Jungwon (2006) Minority rights constraints on a state's power to regulate citizenship under international law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kyprianou, Despina (2006) The role of the Cyprus attorney general's office in prosecutions: Rhetoric, ideology and practice. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Killick, Evan (2005) Living apart: separation and sociality amongst the Ashéninka of Peruvian Amazonia. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Menuchin, Shay Nisan (2005) The dilemma of international tax arbitrage: A comparative analysis using the cases of hybrid financial instruments and cross-border leasing. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Le, Net (2004) Refusal to license: Abuse of dominant position and switching costs. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Sideri, Katerina (2003) The European Commission and the construction of information society: Regulatory law from a processual perspective. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Boelaert-Suominen, Sonja Ann Jozef (1998) International environmental law and naval war: The effect of marine safety and pollution conventions during international armed conflict. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mohamed, Mohamed Sameh Ahmed (1997) The role of the International Court of Justice as the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Jurgielewicz, Lynne (1994) Global environmental change and international law: prospects for progress in the legal order. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Tsai, Ing-Wen (1983) Unfair trade practices and safeguard actions [A digital copy of Ing-wen Tsai's personal copy of the original thesis presented to the Library in 2019.]. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Douzinas, Constantinos (1983) Constitutional law and freedom of expression: a critique of the Constitution of the public sphere in legal discourse and practice with special reference to 20th century American law and jurisprudence. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Lyall, Andrew Bremner (1980) The social origins of property and contract: a study of East Africa before 1918. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Harlow, Carol (1979) Administrative liability: a comparative study of French and English Law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Reynolds, James Isaac (1974) The slum tenant and the common law: a comparative study. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Edwards, Adolph (1968) The development of criminal law in Jamaica up to 1900. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Lasok, Dominik (1954) The Polish Constitutions of 1947 and 1952: a historical study in constitutional law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

IMAGES

  1. LSE PhD Studentships in London 2020 (Fully Funded)

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  2. LSE PhD Studentships for international students 2023-24, London, UK

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  3. PHD Ordinances Regulations 2020

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  4. Fillable Online lse ac Regulations for interview expenses and claim

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  5. A PhD at LSE: the BME student diaries

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  6. New Regulations On PhD Degrees Notified : Latest update

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VIDEO

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  4. LSE European Institute PhD Info Session 2023

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COMMENTS

  1. Guidance and regulations

    Nominating Examiners for MPhil and PhD Examinations [PDF]. Parental Leave Policy for Research Degree Students Please direct queries on parental leave for research degree students to James Ringer, Head of Scholarships and Financial Support ([email protected]) and Dr Pete Mills, PhD Academy Manager ([email protected]).. Part-time study . PhD Log-Guide for Academic Departments

  2. PDF REGULATIONS FOR RESEARCH DEGREES

    For students registered on an MRes/PhD programme, the Regulations for Taught Masters Degrees will apply for the MRes stage of the programme. Students are also subject to published local regulations which apply for each programme of study ... LSE PhD programmes are designed to be followed through a programme of full-time study based at LSE ...

  3. PDF Guidelines for MPhil and PhD examinations For use with Regulations for

    10. The PhD Academy, on behalf of the School's Research Degrees Subcommittee, is responsible for oversight of the examination process and ensuring examiners are appointed in accordance with School regulations and requirements. Questions relating to the examination process should be addressed to the PhD Academy in the first instance.

  4. 2021

    2021. You are here - Welcome to LSE > Calendar > Research > Programme regulations > 2021.

  5. PhD programme

    LSE PhDs are examined under LSE regulations. These regulations specify the criteria for a PhD. You will be guided by your supervisor to ensure that your work is compatible with the criteria for a PhD. It is still useful however to read these regulations as you embark on your PhD and subsequently from time to time to ensure your work remains on ...

  6. PDF MPhil/PhD Handbook 2022/23

    3 Key information 18 Rules and regulations 18 Introduction 18 All years: Presentation at the PhD Day 19 All years: Research ethics review 21 Second year: Upgrading from MPhil to PhD status 22 Third year: The second progress review 23 Fourth year: Submission and examination of the PhD thesis 26 Guidance on academic conduct 27 Key information 28 Term dates and LSE closures - Academic Year 2022/23

  7. The PhD journey

    From the start of the 2021/2022 academic session (from October onwards) regulations have been amended following consultation to allow departments the flexibility to undertake vivas either on campus or remotely, using approved video conferencing facilities. ... To make an application for a replacement MPhil or PhD LSE degree certificate, please ...

  8. PhD FAQs

    This programme is eligible for LSE PhD Studentships, and Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funding. Selection for PhD Studentships and ESRC funding is based on receipt of an application for a place, including all documents before the funding deadline. ... LSE PhDs are examined under LSE research degree regulations.

  9. Applying for a PhD

    Making an application. Read the LSE guidance on applying for a PhD . You will need to write a research proposal, personal statement and have a CV. The referees you choose are important as they will write about your academic achievements and potential. Get in touch with them early and ask for their advice too.

  10. MRes/PhD in Economics

    A student can appeal against the Department's decision on progression to PhD according to the Appeals Regulations for Research Students. Progression to Year 2 of PhD In order to progress to the second year of PhD registration students are required to pass the PhD qualifying field (Paper 7) with a mark of 50% or higher. Award of the PhD in Economics

  11. PDF Student Handbook 2022/23

    Taught course requirements are listed in your MPhil/PhD programme regulations. You need to register for your courses (modules) using Graduate Course Choice via LSE for You. Guidance on using the system can be found here. Note that if you wish to audit a course (ie, if you don't want to enter for examination), you must tick the audit-only box.

  12. PhD Economics admissions FAQs

    The PhD Economics programme is grounded in two years of coursework through the MRes component followed by three to four years of research through the PhD. Also see the LSE Academic Calendar for all Research Students at LSE, where clicking on "Programme Regulations" and "Research Course Guides" will give you detailed insight into the ...

  13. Guidelines for interpreting programme regulations

    Which group of students the regulations apply to. For example, "For students starting this programme of study in 2019/20." The regulations are divided by year of study (Year 1, Year 2, Year 3 etc.). LSE offers programmes that vary in duration from 9/10 months to four years. In each year of study, the courses are divided into 'papers'.

  14. Frequently asked questions

    If you are applying to the MPhil/PhD in Information Systems and Innovation, a GRE or GMAT test score is recommended, but not mandatory. It must be no more than five years old in October 2024 and show full and percentile scores for all sections. LSE GRE and GMAT requirements and submission of test scores, including LSE's institution codes.

  15. PhD FAQs

    LSE's PhD model is designed for full-time funded students, and we strongly recommend full-time registration. We do not recommend attempting to pursue a PhD while in full-time employment. Exceptions for part-time study are only considered for people with specific circumstances such as caring responsibilities and/or health/disability ...

  16. PhD Academy

    The PhD Academy is a dedicated space and services hub for doctoral candidates studying at LSE. ... Guidance and Regulations An A to Z of documents. ... LSE PhD Academy, Lionel Robbins Building (4th floor), 10 Portugal Street, London, WC2A 2HD.

  17. Research

    The LSE Economics PhD Programme is grounded in two years of rigorous coursework through the MRes component and by a strong research element. You can find information about the individual research courses offered through our programmes. As is the norm with top economic departments in the US, students entering the LSE PhD Economics programme are ...

  18. MRes/PhD Programme

    The MRes/PhD in International Development is a one-year research Master's linked to a four-year PhD. The programme grounds students in a common academic heritage while providing them with significant flexibility appropriate to their research interests. We equip our students with advanced methodological and theoretical skills within disciplinary ...

  19. Policies and procedures

    LSE's policies, procedures, regulations and other essential documents. While all policies are primarily aimed at staff and students, the majority have been made publicly available to support transparency and good governance. ... Guidance for the Employment of Graduate Teaching Assistants, Guest Teachers and Emeritus Teachers for departments and ...

  20. MSc Regulation

    The MSc Regulation is based in the LSE Law School and the Department of Government and offers you the chance to study regulation within a systematic framework. Regulatory growth and reform has been an international 'policy boom' in recent years. Governments have increasingly used regulation in preference to other policy instruments.

  21. PhD students: Need to work whilst you study?

    LSE regulations guide you to work for no more than 20 hours per week, outside your academic studies and, if you are a funded student, you should check your funder's specific regulations. That's fine! Many students manage to fulfil the regulations, complete their PhD and leave with a bank of useful experience.

  22. MSc admissions FAQs

    Information on the process of application and admission to MSc programmes offered by the Department of Economics - 2024/5 entry. Applications are processed centrally through the Graduate Admissions Office. All applicants are advised to read the prospectus pages for our individual MSc programmes starting in 2024/5; these can be accessed via ...

  23. Browse by Sets

    Browse by Sets. Number of items at this level: 145. Misra, Tanmay (2023) The invention of corruption: India and the License Raj. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science. Nolan, Katherine Anne (2023) The individual in EU data protection law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.