Home

Welcome to the ETD Submission System

Welcome to Georgia Tech's system for submitting your graduate thesis or dissertation. Undergraduate Research Option Theses are submitted here as well.

Once you have passed the final defense and satisfied the requirements of the committee, you are ready to submit your manuscript to the Thesis Office for review. This submission process is fully electronic, and is made through an online application developed and maintained by the Texas Digital Library, in conjunction with the Texas A&M, MIT, and UIUC.

To get started with your submission, click the link below. You will be asked to authenticate using your GT Account:

Your help can make things better...

Your feedback is very important to us; it allows us to continue to improve the system. Please feel free to notify us directly at [email protected] if you have any suggestions to increase the usability or effectiveness of this application. You can talk to the your Thesis Office regarding any issues that may arise during the submission process.

Please contact the Thesis Office if you have any questions.

If you have questions about an UNDERGRADUATE thesis, please contact the UROP office:   https://urop.gatech.edu/content/contact-us

Vireo 3.0.4 © 2024 Texas Digital Library . All Rights Reserved.

About the Georgia Tech Digital Repository

The mission of the Georgia Tech Digital Repository is to collect, preserve, and expand access to the unique digital collections of immediate and long-term value to Georgia Tech and the global community. The collecting scope of the repository includes Institute research and scholarship; university documents; and special collections. See our Collection Development Policy .

The Georgia Tech Library encourages open, public access to items maintained within the repository; however, there are instances where copyright law or specific needs of the depositor requires campus-only or otherwise restricted access. Institute theses and dissertations between the years of 1978 and 2003 are closed to campus. If you would like to make your GT thesis or dissertation openly available, contact us at [email protected] .

Persistence & Citation

Each record in the repository is assigned a persistent identifier, a long-lasting reference to the digital resource that provides a method for reliably identifying, verifying and locating that resource over time. Repository persistent identifiers are registered using the handle system. Further registration with DataCite and the assignment of a DOI is available for some items upon request. When citing an item in the GT Digital Repository, use the digital resource identifier as the permanent link (usually in the form of http://hdl.handle.net/1853/xxxxx).

Preservation

The Georgia Tech Digital Repository is managed and sustained locally by the GT Library utilizing the DSpace repository platform. Collections are preserved in accordance with the Library’s preservation policy , which articulates the Library’s institutional commitment to steward its collections over time for use by current stakeholders and future generations. All materials within the repository are preserved via distributed digital copies maintained both here at Georgia Tech via daily snapshots and offsite in DuraCloud as archival information packages. All Georgia Tech created digital materials held by the Library are included in this network.

Content in the Georgia Tech Digital Repository is considered permanent in nature. However, under certain circumstances, such as copyright violation, it may be deemed necessary by the Georgia Tech Library to withdraw items from the repository. Withdrawal requests may be initiated by contacting [email protected] .edu . The Georgia Tech Library reserves the right to evaluate the request and make a decision about whether to withdraw the item. Scholarship may not be withdrawn because the depositor or author is no longer affiliated with the Institute. The depositor has the right to give additional copies to other institutions under the non-exclusive agreement. Since 2004, Georgia Tech has required all theses and dissertations be submitted electronically, with the electronic copy of record being housed in the Georgia Tech Digital Repository. Every Georgia Tech student submitting a thesis or dissertation is required to sign the repository license agreement. This agreement assigns a non-exclusive license to Georgia Tech to preserve and make available the online, electronic copy of the thesis, after any author prescribed embargo periods. This means that Georgia Tech will generally not withdraw any thesis from open online access, except under extreme extenuating circumstances, such as the discovery of a copyright violation. To avoid loss of the scholarly record, any withdrawal transactions will be documented in the form of a note in the description.provenance field of the Dublin Core item record. Additionally, because any repository item may have been cited or linked, we will always supply a tombstone item record which will include the original metadata (for verification), plus one of the notes below in place of the link to the object. The content of the note in the item record should be one of the following:

  • "removed from view at request of the author"
  • "removed from view by legal order"
  • "removed from view at Georgia Institute of Technology's discretion"
  • "removed from view at Georgia Institute of Technology Library's discretion"

Skip to content

Georgia Institute of Technology College of Sciences

Search form.

  • You are here:
  • Graduate Programs

Dissertations

Here is the complete list of all doctoral dissertations granted by the School of Math, which dates back to 1965. Included below are also all masters theses produced by our students since 2002. A combined listing of all dissertations and theses , going back to 1934, is available at Georgia Tech's library archive. For the post PhD employment of our graduates see our  Alumni Page .

Doctoral Dissertations

Masters dissertations.

Skip to content

School of Psychology

College of sciences, search form, senior thesis.

Doing a senior thesis is the ideal way to put your course work to use, but it is up to the student to find a faculty member to supervise his or her thesis. Some theses are based on hypotheses that undergraduates develop from course work or other readings but more often they are based on other research taking place in a faculty member's lab. Because research is time consuming, students should plan on thesis research and writing taking at least 2 semesters.

A faculty member nominates a student to do a senior thesis by filling out the Senior Thesis Nomination form (download for fillable form) and turning it in to the Undergraduate Coordinator. This does not preclude a student from initiating this process by approaching a faculty member and asking the faculty member if he or she is willing to supervise a thesis. The nomination form must be signed by the nominator – who presumably will be the supervisor of the thesis – as well as a second reader. The nomination should take place the semester before the student would take Psyc 4601 (Senior Thesis).

A faculty member can withdraw his or her nomination prior to the semester in which Psyc 4601 would begin if the nominator believes the student is not prepared to carry out the thesis. A student may also elect to drop Psyc 4601.

Readers of Senior Thesis

There must be two readers of a senior thesis; the first reader must be the supervisor of the thesis. The supervisor and second reader must be regular or adjunct faculty in the School of Psychology. The grade for Psyc 4601 is determined by the supervisor of the thesis as long as the second reader agrees that the thesis deserves at least a "D."

The second reader must be given the thesis document at least two weeks prior to the end of the term (in which the student is taking Psyc 4601) to read the thesis and provide feedback for possible revisions that would need to be completed before the end of the term.

Credit Hours for Senior Thesis

Students are advised to make their senior thesis a two-semester sequence.

For the first (typically, Fall) semester, the student would register for 3 hours of Psyc 4600 (Senior Thesis). The product of Psyc 4600 is a research proposal for the work to be completed in Psyc 4601 (Senior Thesis II).

For the second (typically, Spring) semester, the student would register for 4 hours of Psyc 4601 (Senior Thesis).

This approach would recognize the reality of the time involved in preparing and carrying out a senior thesis. It would also allow for the possibility that a student might be assigned an incomplete or a failing grade for Psyc 4601 (for example, for not completing the thesis) while still receiving credit that recognizes the preparatory work (by presumably receiving a passing grade in Psyc 4600).

Thesis Content and Format

A senior thesis will ordinarily be an empirical study although in certain cases it can be an integrative review paper. Theses must be written in APA format.

Collecting Senior Theses

A PDF copy of the thesis must be given (e.g., via e-mail) to the Undergraduate Coordinator. The PDF copy will be uploaded to the School of Psychology web page and will become part of the repository of senior theses that can be accessed by interested people – especially psychology majors and their advisors – who wish to get a sense of what might constitute a reasonable senior thesis.

Certificate of Approval

A Certificate of Senior Thesis Approval  form must be completed by the student and signed by the two readers of the thesis and the Undergraduate Coordinator.

The readers will not sign the form until both are satisfied with the thesis document. The Undergraduate Coordinator will sign the form after the form has been signed by the readers and the Undergraduate Coordinator has received a PDF copy of the final version of the thesis. The original signed form is kept by the supervisor of the thesis and a copy is kept by the Undergraduate Coordinator.

A grade will be turned in for Psyc 4601 (by the supervisor of the thesis) when the approval form has been signed by both readers and the Undergraduate Coordinator.

  • Google Plus

Georgia Tech Resources

  • Offices & Departments
  • News Center
  • Campus Calendar
  • Special Events
  • Institute Communications
  • Visitor Resources
  • Campus Visits
  • Directions to Campus
  • Visitor Parking Information
  • GTvisitor Wireless Network Information
  • Georgia Tech Global Learning Center
  • Georgia Tech Hotel & Conference Center
  • Barnes & Noble at Georgia Tech
  • Ferst Center for the Arts
  • Robert C. Williams Paper Museum

Map of Georgia Tech - School of Psychology

School of Psychology J.S. Coon Bldg Georgia Institute of Technology 654 Cherry Street Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0170 Telephone: 404-894-2680

Georgia Institute of Technology North Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30332 404.894.2000

  • Emergency Information
  • Enable Accessibility
  • Legal & Privacy Information
  • Human Trafficking Notice
  • Title IX/Sexual Misconduct
  • Hazing Public Disclosures
  • Accessibility
  • Accountability
  • Accreditation

© Georgia Institute of Technology

Student Research

As an undergraduate or graduate student at one of the foremost institutions in the nation, there are many reasons to delve into research. Research sparks critical thinking and creativity and hones the ability to post the right question, solve for the right answer, and dispel the messy, complex, and abstract thoughts of a lab notebook into an elegant argument. Research is the innate pursuit of progress and service and the catalyst of innovation. We work to enhance it.

Georgia Tech undergraduate students have many opportunities to participate in research with faculty across campus. The best way for you to begin your career in research is to review faculty web pages and working papers see who is doing research that you find exciting. Read more about getting started in undergraduate research .

Undergraduate students should also look for information on the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program website.  Graduate students should speak to their faculty advisor for information on the thesis, dissertation, or independent research and view the Graduate Studies Theses and Dissertations website.

Georgia Tech Library

The Georgia Tech Library offers many resources for both undergraduate and graduate students. The School of Economics has a subject librarian who is available to offer advice on ways to research topics and give assistance with verification of bibliographic citations. He can also provide library orientations and give assistance in developing research assignments. Please visit the Georgia Tech Library website for further information.

Georgia Tech Library Digital Repository

All Georgia Tech theses and dissertations are available electronically through the Georgia Tech institutional repository. Theses and dissertations published 2004 to the present are openly accessible.  You can search for School of Economics papers in the repository or submit a paper or dissertation to the repository .

ECON 3161:  Econometric Analysis

Students enrolled in ECON 3161: Econometric Analysis are required to write a research paper using the knowledge learned in the course. If you would like to review past papers produced by our students, please see the Econometric Analysis Series page in the Georgia Tech Library Digital Repository dedicated to the course.

georgia tech thesis

School of City & Regional Planning

College of design.

Students giving a research presentation

Applied Research Papers & Master’s Theses

Applied research papers are completed by MCRP students as practice-oriented alternatives to theses. These papers utilize practical skills and draw conclusions related to professional planning practice.

This page showcases selected applied research papers and theses that were completed in recent years. For a complete archive, please visit the SMARTech collection hosted by the Georgia Tech Library.

Applied Research Papers

2023 Applied Research Papers

Brennan, Laurence. "America’s Gayborhoods: A Study in the Cultural Preservation of LGBTQ+ Communities" . 2023. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Xie, Yan. "Nihonbashi Retail Space and Shopping Activity Research: Daily and Pandemic" . 2023. Supervised by Perry Yang.

Ward, Jeremy. "The economy geography of assisted living homes: examining the locations, demographics, considerations, and trends of the assisted living home industry in Georgia" . 2023. Supervised by Nancy Green Leigh. 

Rawlins, Miles. "Finding a Nice Place to Sit: A Case Study of Midtown's Public Space" . 2023. Supervised by Perry Yang.

Knight-Scott, Ethan. "Commercial property undervaluation in Fulton County, Georgia: Determinants of appraisal error using ANOVA testing" . 2023. Supervised by Elora Raymond. 

Neaves, Thomas. "The Redevelopment of the Macon Mall Through a Social Infrastructure Lens" . 2023. Supervised by William Drummond.

Zhao, Yuxiang. "Tokyo Nihonbashi Visual Walkability Analysis" . 2023. Supervised by Perry Yang. 

Master, Michaela. " 1540 Northside Drive: Resilient, Redeveloped, Reimagined" . 2023. Supervised by Subhro Guhathakurta. 

Cena, Kortney. "Make Commercial Spaces Small Again: The Commercial Missing Middle and Strategies to Address It" . 2023. Supervised by Paige Clayton.

Jimenez, Miguel. "Cities and Placemaking in the Hispanic Monarchy: Theory, Case Studies, and Lessons for Contemporary Practice" . 2023. Supervised by Jennifer Hirsh, Mike Dobbins. 

Ruggles, Darien. " Now You've Got Broadband - What's Next? Strategies for Local Leaders to Increase Professional Digital Usage and Application in their Community". 2-23. Supervised by Paige Clayton. 

Raven, Roxanne. "The Environmental Impacts of Cityhood Movements in Atlanta: A Brookhaven Case Study" . 2023. Supervised by Brian Stone. 

2022 Applied Research Papers

Ling, Sharon . " An Atlanta-Based Analysis on the Feasibility of Employee Commute Options Programs and Switching from Driving Alone to Alternative Commute Modes ." 2022. Supervised by Kari Watkins .

Maurer, Colin . " Drawing Connections between Railway Station Ridership and Adjacent Urban Form ." 2022. Supervised by Paige Clayton .

Newman, Ian . " Evacuation with Efficiency: An Inland and Coastal Flood Based Emergency Evacuation Planning Scorecard Proposal . " 2022. Supervised by William J. Drummond .

White, Reginald Jr . " Preservation of African American Spaces: Case Study of Sweet Auburn Neighborhood of Atlanta,Georgia. " 2022. Supervised by Elora Raymond .

2021 Applied Research Papers

Chatman, Olivia E . "An Analysis of Covid-19, Air Quality, Race, and Socioeconomic Status in Georgia" . 2021. Supervised by Brian Stone, Jr.

2020 Applied Research Papers

As-Salaam, Kamau. " Neighborhood Security and Resiliency: Reviving East Washington ." 2020. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

Corrao, Laurel. " Perspective on Planning for Sea Level Rise . " 2020. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Dervarics, Kelly. " Staying Afloat in Affordable Housing Production: An Initial Examination and Framework of Cost Savings for Mercy Housing Southeast. " 2020. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Ferreira, Andrea. " A Tale of Two (Modern) Cities: A Comparison of the Attempts to Regulate Airbnb in San Francisco and Boston. " 2020. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Haley, Victor. " The Impact of Eviction on Student Displacement: An Atlanta Case Study. " 2020. Supervised by Elora Raymond.

Hart, Haley. " Combating Food Insecurity within Universities ." 2020.  Supervised by Brian Stone.

Jerath, Shikha. " Racial Discrimination in the Atlanta Mortgage Market, 2012 - 2017 ." 2020.  Supervised by Elora Raymond.

Macbeth, Joshua. " Affordable Atlanta ." 2020.  Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Martin, Katherine. " Leveraging Technology as a Community Engagement Strategy. " 2020.  Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Orsini, Callie. " In the Mix: Middle Housing and Income Diversity in Atlanta ." 2020.  Supervised by Elora Raymond.

Pimentel, Ruth. " Funding Parks for Community Interests ." 2020.  Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Prendergast, Kyla. " The Influence of Transit - Oriented Developments on Housing Cost and Ridership in Denver, Colorado ." 2020.  Supervised by Elora Raymond.

Jiang, Qian. " The Impact of Traffic Density on Lane-Changing Frequency ." 2020. 

Seidenberg, Alex. " Bridging the Affordability Gap: How Can Faith Based Organizations Leverage Their Real Estate Assets? " 2020.  Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Staley, Rachel. " Historic Preservation and Downtown Revitalization: How Does the Georgia Main Street Program Affect the Population Size, Racial Makeup, Median Household Income, and Retail Sales of Designated Cities? " 2020.  Supervised by Brian Stone.

Zakas, Chelsea. " Climate Mitigation Planning: Are Plans with Policy Tools Measurably More Effective? " 2020.  Supervised by Brian Stone.

Zhen, Shuhui. " Increasing Bicycles’ Share of Commuter Trips in Atlanta through Improved Trip Routing Methodologies. " 2020.  Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

2019 Applied Research Papers

Baggett, Anna. " Combatting the Urban Heat Island Effect: What Trees Are Suitable for Atlanta’s Current and Future Climate? " 2019. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Bleckley, Claire. " Georgia’s Regional Planning System: An Evaluation of the State’s 12 Regional Development Commissions .” 2019. Supervised by Nancey Green Leigh.

Brice, Paul-Emile. " Resort Towns: Making a Case Study of Montego Bay and Bavaro Punta Cana .” 2019. Supervised by Alberto Fuentes.

Carpenter, Sophia. " Planning for Blue and Green: A Case for Green Infrastructure .” 2019. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Carter, Melody. " Federal Opportunity Zones: The newest gentrification tool? ” 2019. Supervised by Nancey Green Leigh.

Cooper, Carson. " Does distributed green infrastructure or centralized green infrastructure have a greater effect on urban stormwater flow & pollutant loads? ” 2019. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Coyle, Tyler. " Houston Townhomes & Affordability: Relative townhome prices 2005-2018 .” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Davison, Brianna. " A Case for Expanding Heritage Tourism in Atlanta, Georgia by Exploring Sites From the Negro Motorist Green Book .” 2019. Supervised by Nancey Green Leigh.

Denison, John. "  The Determinants and Implications of Local Minimum Wage Adoption .” 2019. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Everhart, Justina. " Coastal Wetlands and Sea-Level Rise: A Case for Climate Adaptation Zones in Coastal Georgia .” 2019. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Friedman, Mirit. " Promoting the Economic Mobility of Clients Through Identifying Leverage Points in the Atlanta Community Food Bank Partner Network. ” 2019. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey​

Gao, Meng. " Bike Infrastructure Evaluation of Midtown Atlanta, A GIS and Statistics Based Study. ” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Geronimo, Laura. " Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge: Incorporating Uncertainty and Equity into Transportation Planning for the San Juan Metropolitan Area, Puerto Rico. ” 2019. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

Graszer, Grace. " Closing Peachtree and Pine: Evaluating Homeless Strategies in Atlanta, Georgia .” 2019. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Healy, Clare. " Middle Ground: Market Demand and the Housing Supply Mismatch for Middle Housing in the United States. ” 2019. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Huffman, Leigh. " The Impact of Urbanization on Biodiversity in the Asheville-Brevard Combined Statistical Area. ” 2019. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Johnson, Nicholas. " Expanding Equity in Sustainability Projects Through Community Engagement: Can Organizations Adapt? ” 2019. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Johnson, Jennifer. " Using K-12 Schools to Promote Sustainable Communities. ” 2019. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

McCoy, Trevor. “ Reallocating Food Waste: Evaluating Food Waste Management Options for Atlanta ” 2019. Supervised by Michael Elliott.

Pang, Jian. " A Review on The Concept of Transit-dependency And The Research on The Multidimensional Transit-dependency Index .” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Schlom, Ryan. " How Has U+2 Enforcement Affected Housing Affordability in Fort Collins? Using the Synthetic Control Method to Analyze the Affordability Implications of Residential Occupancy Regulation .” 2019. Supervised by Thom Malone.

Scott, Eric. " Parking at Megachurches - Managing accessibility, hospitality and stewardship: A Case Study of Peachtree Presbyterian Church .” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Sherman, Andrea. " Rural Mobility for Older Adults: Matching Georgia’s Future Needs with Potential Capacity for Volunteer Driver Programs .” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Sherman, Jonathan. " A Flood Resilience Policy Analysis: New York City .” 2019. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Smith, Andrew. " Envisioning a Complete Streets Prioritization Scheme for Georgia’s Small and Medium-Sized Cities. ” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Stephens, Nicholas. " Toward a Complete Park: Pursuing ideals of social equity, ecological enrichment and economic empowerment for the Westside Park at Bellwood Quarry, a regional-scale park in Atlanta, Georgia. ” 2019. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Tyger, Curtis. " Church-Based Transportation: A New Shared Mobility Service That Converts Church Parking Lots into Transportation Hubs for Metro Atlanta Communities .” 2019. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

2018 Applied Research Papers

Agnew, Darian. " Extending homeownership opportunities to prospective borrowers burdened by student loan debt. " 2018. Supervised by Anna Kim.

Browne, Samantha. "  The Causes and Effects of Environmental Gentrification: An Examination of the Impacts of the Trinity River Balanced Vision Plan on West Dallas, TX. " 2018. Supervised by Thomas Debo.

Dieg, Melanie. " Is Columbia a Different Neighbor? A Comparative Analysis of University Real Estate Acquisition Practices. " 2018. Supervised by Anna Kim.

Diwangkari, Andyan. " Urban Form and Neighborhood Vulnerability to Climate Change Case Study: Jakarta, Indonesia. " 2018. Supervised by Perry Yang.

Dodson, Christy. " Neighborhood Diversity and Middle Housing in an Atlanta Context. " 2018. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Duncan, Dorraine. " Participatory Solid Waste Management A Proposal for Jamaica's Informal Settlements. " 2018. Supervised by Michael Elliott.

Dutt, Florina. " Reclaiming Public Realm to Improve Human Heatlh and Enviornment in Indian Cities. " 2018. Supervised by Subhro Guhathakurta.

Erwin, Lexi. " Working Moms and Economic Development Policy: Are We Planning for Women? " 2018. Supervised by Anna Kim.

French, Megan. " Accuracy of a Heat Vulnerability Index for Estimating Heat Mortality in Dallas, Texas. " 2018. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Galloway, Allison. " Slow Urbanism as a Sprawl Antidote Winning the Race on Foot Borrowing from Slow Urbanism's Place-Based Sustainable Practices. " 2018. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Hirt, Mary. " Homeownership and Racial Wealth Disparity in the Southeast: Factor Ratio Reweighting Analysis of Homeownership in Six Southeast States and the Importance of Race-Conscious Housing Policies. " 2018. Supervised by Anna Kim.

Ijaz, Mishele. " Growth versus Development: The Case of China Pakistan Economic Corridor. " 2018. Supervised by Nancey Green Leigh.

Lancaster, Zachary. " Information Theory as a Measure of Sociodemographic Change. " 2018. Supervised by Perry Yang.

Marinelli, Abigail. " Curbing Zombie Cars: Implementing a VMT Tax on Zero-Occupant AVs to Discourage Unnecessary Trips. " 2018. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

Meng, Chao. " Evaluation of the Equity of Bikeshare System Accessibility: A Case Study of Chicago. " 2018. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Mildner, Caitlin. " Planning for Local Agency Transportation Asset Management An Analysis of Knowledge and Resource Shortcomings within Local Georgia Agencies. " 2018. Supervised by Subhro Guhathakurta.

Morrison, Marc. " Atlanta's Urban Ecosystem Services: A Neighborhood Comparison Analysis. " 2018. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Rao, Pooja. " Transit fare structure and equity: Case of MARTA, Atlanta. " 2018. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Rogers, Ian Michael. " Historic Preservation & Progress in Atlanta: Zoning Strategies for Adaptive Reuse and Revitalization ." 2018. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Saxton, John. " A High-Injury Network for Atlanta. " 2018. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Sepkowitz, Isabel. " The Great Retail Metamorphosis: How Americans Shop is How Americans Live Metro Atlanta Case Study. " 2018. Supervised by Subhro Guhathakurta.

Thayer, Chris. " Contesting Conventional Wisdom: The Link Between Subsidy Layering and Legal Expenses in the LIHTC Program. " 2018. Supervised by Anna Kim.

Van Dyke, Rebecca. " The Impact of Gender, Race, and Income on Transit Travel Behavior in Boston and Atlanta. " 2018. Supervised by Michael Elliott.

Veriah, Revathi. " Classification of Informal Settlements Based on their Susceptibility to Climate Change. " 2018. Supervised by Michael Elliott.

Waidhas, Kelsey. " An Academic Addendum for the Sandy Springs Wayfinding System: An Option Paper Report. " 2018. Supervised by William Drummond.

Woods, Gloria. " Resilient Black Neighborhoods in Urban Environments Through Effective Community Planning. " 2018. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Wu, Yanlin. " Modifying and Extending the Geodesign Framework for Eco Campus Design Project. " 2018. Supervised by Perry Yang.

2017 Applied Research Papers

Anand, Spandana. " The Future of Transportation: Autonomous Vehicles. " 2017. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Barrow, Megan. " As Sea Level Rise in the Southeast, Are Transportation Planners on Board with Climate Justice? " 2017. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Bedsole, Matthew. " Developing a Charitable and Targeted Property Tax Relief Fund: An Anti-Displacement Initiative for Atlanta’s Westside Neighborhoods. " 2017. Supervised by Mike Dobbins. 

Boyd, Nicholas. " The Urban Forest and Environmental Justice: A Review of the Literature. " 2017. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Bozarth, Ashley. " Permanent Supportive Housing in the City of Atlanta: Transitioning to a Comprehensive Housing First Approach. " 2017. Supervised by Dan Immergluck.

Burnette, Caroline. " Predicting Revitalization: a descriptive narrative and predictive analysis of neighborhood revitalization in Atlanta, Georgia. " 2017. Supervised by Subhro Guhathakurta.

Butler, Catherine. " Green Development Assessing Opportunities for the City of Atlanta. " 2017. Supervised by Dan Immergluck.

Day, Anna. " In Favor of Farm to Fork: An assessment of the local food system in metropolitan Atlanta. " 2017. Supervised by Michael Elliot.

De Leon, David. " Bridging the Gap: an Analysis of the Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis and Social Service and Affordable Housing Accessibility in Atlanta ." 2017. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Duckworth, Richard. " Preparing for Light Rail in the Purple Line Corridor. " 2017. Supervised by Alex Karner. 

Estes, Emily. " Do Young Children Affect Travel Behavior for Parents in Atlanta? " 2017. Supervised by Anna Kim.

Fleming, Ryan. " Strip Clubs in Portland, Oregon and Atlanta, Georgia: The Tension between First Amendment Free Speech & Crime-related Secondary Effects. " 2017. Supervised Nancey Green Leigh.

French, Emma. " People-centered Planning for Smart Cities: Exploring the Use of Smart Cities Technologies in Efforts to Engage the Public in Planning in and around Proctor Creek Watershed. " 2017. Supervised by Anna Kim.

Hanson, Alex. " Measuring the Impact of Complete Streets Projects on Bicyclist and Pedestrian Safety in Sacramento County, California. " 2017. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Hashemi Toroghi, Shahaboddin. " Toward a Sustainable Neighborhood: Examining the Impact of the Mixed-use Development on Neighborhood Energy Consumption. " 2017. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Haston, Joshua. " Planning the Next BRAC: Redevelopment Alternatives for Dobbins Air Reserve Base and Air Force Plant No. 6. " 2017. Supervised by Brian Stone. 

Kent, Margaret. " Prioritizing Low-Stress Bicycle Accessibility in Baltimore. " 2017. Supervised by Alex Karner.

Kong, Jing. " Impact Analysis of the Built Environment on Quality of Life. " 2017. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Mara, Kevin. " Large-Scale Mixed-Use Developments as Catalytic Real Estate Projects: Evaluating the Narrative of Neighborhood Revitalization. " 2017. Supervised by Dan Immergluck.

Mayor, Phoebe. " Striking the Balance between Neighborhood Change and Income Diversity Lessons from Metropolitan Atlanta. " 2017. Supervised by Anna Kim.

Metal, Melanie. " Tailoring Green Stormwater Infrastructure to Hawiian Lansdcapes. " 2017. Supervised by William Drummond.

Patterson, Grant. " Arts-Based Neighborhood Revitalization Engaging Artists & Creative Entrepreneurs to Identify Policy Recommendations to Support Arts-Based Revitalization in South Downtown, Atlanta. " 2017. Supervised by Anna Kim.

Shelton, Austin. " This Place Matters: Exploring Rural Planning through Funding a Rail-Trail in Harris County, Georgia. " 2017. Supervised by William Drummond.

Yang, Wenhui. " Analysis on Social Impacts of Atlanta Streetcar Systems Emissions. " 2017. Supervised by TIm Welch.

Zeng, Tianran. " Transit as Solution for Spatial Mismatch. " 2017. Supervised by Tim Welch.

2016 Applied Research Papers

Bonn, Sara Jane. " Digital Media and the Built Environment: the Potential Impact of Digital Devices on Public Space ." 2016. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Boyd, Joseph. " Walkability, Pedestrian Infrastructure, & Transit Access in Atlanta: A Case Study on Ashby, Inman Park/Reynoldstown, and Lindbergh MARTA Stations ." 2016. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Buker, Allison. " Mapping the Morphological History of Westside Savannah ." 2016. Supervised by Richard Dagenhart. 

Collot, Adeline. " A Culture of High Speeds and Accumulating Debt: A Case Study of French High-Speed Rail Financing Practices. " 2016. Supervised by Time Welch.

Date, Chirag. " Virtual and Fantastic Urban Perceptions through Cinema and Their Relation to Contemporary Cities ." 2016. Supervised by Mike Dobbins.

McKinney, Mia. " A Dream Deferred? Utilizing the Limited-Equity Housing Cooperative Model as a Solution to Atlanta's Affordable Housing Issue. " 2016. Supervised by Mike Dobbins.

Kao, Mindy. " Creating Fair Housing Metrics and Milestones Using Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) Data " 2016. Supervised by Dan Immergluck. .

Lueders, Abram. "J ane Jacobs, Quantified: Exploring the Legacy of the 20th Century’s Most Provocative Urban Theorist ." 2016. Supervised by Dan Immergluck.

Maines, Katherine. " How Observation Can Enhance Understanding of Walkability and Bikability around Transit Stations ." 2016. Supervised by Brian Stone. 

Martin, Tyler. " Assessing the Influence of Policy Factors on Alternative Fuel Vehicle Adoption in Georgia ." 2016. Supervised by Catherine Ross. 

Price, Shelley. " Enhancing National Parks for Visitors with Disabilities through Customer-Experience-Based Decision Making ." 2016. Supervised by Michael Elliott.

Reeves, William. " Activating the Alleys of Austin ." 2016. Supervised by Mike Dobbins.

Sanker, Rishi Raghav. " Urban Tourism and Transportation: A Lesson For Atlanta. " 2016. Supervised by Catherine Ross. 

Smith, Stephanie." An Evaluation of the Physical and Demographic Characteristics Contributing to On-Site Sewage Management System Failure in Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia ." 2016. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Yanten, Angelica. " School Closures and Their Impact on Local Communities ." 2016. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

2015 Applied Research Papers

Ashdown, Marcus. “ Alternative Intersection Design Strategies: How Georgia and the US are Changing Outdated Transportation Design Techniques .” 2015. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Auguin, Corentin. " Toward Financially Sustainable Public Transportation Systems-Type of Service Impacts on Cost Efficiency. " 2015. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Bowman, Ryan. “ Planning and Policy Implementation Strategies for Green Stormwater Best Management Practices in the Proctor Creek Watershed, Atlanta, Ga .” 2015. Supervised by Brian Stone.

Bustin, Allison. “ Zoning For Obesity: Incorporating Context-Based Strategies For Improved Health In Municipal Zoning Codes.” 2015. Supervised by Michael Dobbins.

Cook, Kirsten.  “Planning Through the Shared Use of Resources: A Case Study of DeKalb County, Georgia.” 2015. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Davis, Khaliff.  “Can Pop-Up Shops Improve My Community? An Analysis of the Linkages between Tactical Urbanism and Community Development.” 2015.  Supervised by Dan Immergluck.

Grimes, Jennifer.  “The Atlanta Beeline: Invertebrate Pollinator Corridor Suitability Analysis of the Metropolitan Atlanta Region.” 2015. Supervised by Bill Drummond.

Guthart, Robert.  “Analysis of Transportation Accessibility to Hospitals in Jacksonville, Florida.” 2015. Supervised by Perry Yang.

Ingram, Carlton.  “An Infill Station in Atlanta: Evaluating a MARTA rail stop at Hulsey Yard.”  2015. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Mingus, Charlene Deanne.  “Bicyclist Perceived Level of Traffic Stress: A Quality-of-Service Measure.” 2015. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Novsam, Jason.  “The Decline and Asymmetrical Resurgence of American Transit: A Case Study of Seattle.” 2015. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Perumbeti, Katherine.  “An Assessment of Social and Health Equity in Atlanta Streets Alive Events.” 2015. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Plante, Jessica.  “LIHTC Developments in Atlanta and Neighborhood Effects .” 2015. Supervised by Dan Immergluck.

Rindge, Brianna.  “Sustainable Development for Professional Sports Stadiums.” 2015. Supervised by Bill Drummond.

Shields, Madelyn.  “Women's Participation in Seattle's High-Tech Economy.” 2015. Supervised by Anna Kim. 

Featured Applied Research Papers

One side of a duplex home located in Atlanta, Ga.

Caledonia Orsini (MCRP '20)

A hand reaches into a bin of markers set out at a community engagement event to gather community information.

Katherine Martin (MCRP+MS-PP '20)

2021 theses.

Kim, Ilsu. " Has the COVID-19 Pandemic Changed People’s Attitudes about Where to Live? Some Preliminary Answers from a Study of the of the Atlanta Housing Market ." 2021. Supervised by Subhrajit Guhathakurta.

Lee, Seolha. " The Shape of Discourse in Urban Movements through the Lens of Social Media: A Case Study of the Anti-Redevelopment Movement in South Korea ." 2021. Supervised by Clio Andris.

Miller, Bryce Curtis. " Cluster-based Delineation of Megaregions in the United States: Identifying administrative boundaries that reflect meta-communities to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of governments ." 2021. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

2020 Theses

Arias, Daniel Fernando. "Estimating the Effects of Vehicle Speeds on Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety on the Georgia Arterial Roadway Network." 2020.

Jiang, Qian. " Transit-Oriented Development Parking Demand Analysis: A Case Study of MARTA." 2020.

Rose, Jessica. " The Application of Ecosystem Services in Higher Education Planning ." 2020.

Postma, Deborah E. " The Future of Streets in an Age of Pandemics ." 2020.

Todd, Kara Grace. " Evaluating the Costs and Benefits of Implementing a MARTA Youth Fare ." 2020.

Tucker, William. " Measuring Climate Resilience in the Built Environment Around the Atlanta Beltline. " 2020.

2019 Theses

Boddupalli, Sreekar-Shashank. “Estimating Demand for an Electric Vertical Landing Takeoff (eVTOL) Air Taxi Service Using Discrete Choice Modeling” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Borsch, Adam. “Analyzing the Difference Between Bike Share Trips Made on Regular and Electric Bicycles” 2019. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

Chang, Chia-Huai. “Estimating Managed Lanes Door-to-door Travel Timesavings using Shortest Path Algorithms” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Greenwald, Jeremy. “It Takes Green to Go Green: An Atlanta-Based Evolution of Employer-Provided Commuting Incentives as a Method to Overcome  Worksite Car-Dependency” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Patel, Deep. “Economic and Social Sustainability of Sidewalk Infrastructure” 2019. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

2018 Theses

Douglass, Sara. "Federal Transit Funding Implications of Urbanization: A Nationwide Assessment" 2018. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Dyess, Chelsea. "An Assessment of Pedestrian Infrastructure Quality and the Effect on Travel Time and Mobility for Users with Physical Limitations." 2018. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Nord, Anna. " A Statewide Assessment of Trending Urban Areas in Georgia and the Implications on Rural Public Transit Funding." 2018. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

Senthilkumar, Sanjay. "Making Bike Share Transit Compatible." 2018. Supervised by Timothy Welch.

Tobey, Michael. "Linking MPBN and System of Systems Thinking: To Improve Outcomes in Urban Environments." 2018. Supervised by Perry Yang.

2017 Theses

Koo, Bonwoo. "Spatio-temporal Patterns of Urban Tree Canopy and Environmental Equity in Atlanta." 2017. Supervised by Nisha Botchwey.

Sperling, Elliot. "Advancing Strategic Focuses through Performance-based Evaluation – the Growth of State DOT Approaches." 2017. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

2016 Theses

Martin, Tyler. "Assessing the Influence of Policy Factors on Alternative Fuel Vehicle Adoption in Georgia." 2016. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

Smith, Stephanie. "An Evaluation of the Physical and Demographic Characteristics Contributing to On-Site Sewage Management System Failure in Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia." 2016. Supervised by Brian Stone.

2015 Theses

Bearn, Cary. "Measuring Low Stress Bike access to MARTA." 2015. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

Maier, George. "Forecasting Ridership Impacts of Transit Oriented Development at MARTA Rail Stations." 2015. Supervised by Tim Welch.

Plummer, Audrey. "Retroffiting Closed Golf Courses." 2015. Supervised by Richard Dagenhart.

Prabhakar, Niranjani. "Measuring Cost-Effectiveness of Idle Reduction Technologies in Heavy Duty Trucks." 2015. Supervised by Catherine Ross.

Research and Innovation

Undergraduate research.

Undergraduate research offers students a unique opportunity to apply knowledge in a meaningful, real-world context to solve problems and explore issues no one has ever addressed. Students doing undergraduate research have the chance to develop deeper relationships with faculty and graduate students and to expand their résumé that will allow them to stand out to graduate schools and potential employers.

The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) facilitates research experiences for undergraduates across all disciplines. UROP creates initiatives to encourage students to participate in knowledge creation and research enterprise with Georgia Tech's world-class faculty. Students may participate in laboratory, scientific, or computing research, or they may be involved in new discoveries in literature, social sciences, architecture, or business. Undergraduate students can participate in part-time or full-time research for course credit or pay. Opportunities are available Institute-wide, within specific colleges and schools, and in interdisciplinary settings.

Additional opportunities include the President's Undergraduate Research Awards (PURA), the Research Option, spring symposia, workshops, and training sessions. Students may also reach out to their peers, in the  Undergraduate Research Ambassadors  mentoring program, regarding any of the UROP programs or for assistance in finding research opportunities at Georgia Tech.  More information is available on the  Undergraduate Research  web page.

The Research Option

The Research Option offers students the opportunity for an in-depth, long-term research experience that culminates in a final paper or thesis. While the exact requirements for a research option vary by the academic unit, students typically take the following steps:

  • Over at least two, preferably three, terms
  • For research for-pay to count towards the Research Option, you must register for an audit-only class (2698 or 4698 in most but not all academic units).
  • LMC 4701  (typically taken during the first or second term of research in order to help students complete their required proposal), and
  • LMC 4702  (taken during the term in which the thesis is completed).
  • Write a research proposal and submit a signed copy by two faculty readers (one being the primary faculty mentor) to the UROP office.  All proposals must be approved and submitted, at the latest, before the student takes LMC 4702 and their final term of research. We would prefer that you complete and submit the signed and approved proposal upon completion of LMC 4701.  
  • Write an undergraduate thesis/report of research on their findings prior to graduation or upon completion of LMC 4702. This must be uploaded to the Georgia Tech online thesis database by the last day of finals of the students graduating semester.  
  • Submit the Certification Form for their participating school into the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program office prior to graduation.  The forms may be found  here .  This form must be signed by two faculty readers (one being the primary faculty mentor), the undergraduate coordinator for the participating school, and the student.

For more information on specific plans and a list of participating schools, visit the  Research Option  web page.

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Georgia Tech strongly encourages students to explore research and innovation in practical ways. The Student Innovation program (SIp) fosters growth by giving students the opportunity to engage with one another, faculty, and members of the wider global community involved in innovation. SIp collaborates with several on- and off-campus organizations and departments to coordinate campus-wide events, startup/innovation competitions, funding opportunities, coaching, mentorship, course instruction, targeted in-class presentations, incoming students and family presentations, and curriculum development.

SIp assists students in finding practical applications for their work and promotes the importance of moving research and innovation into society to solve the world's problems. The program personnel also advises several student organizations focused on enhancing the entrepreneurship ecosystem that currently exists at Georgia Tech. 

This program coordinates the  InVenture Prize , a faculty-led innovation competition for undergraduate students and recent BS graduates of Georgia Tech. This competition is one of the largest invention and startup competitions in the United States. It emboldens students with an entrepreneurial and inventive interest to apply their skills and see the world as endless opportunities. Students who participate in this program are provided with one-on-one mentors, coaching, and awards to encourage prototype development.

More information is available on the  Student Innovation website . 

This site uses cookies. Review the Privacy & Legal Notice . Email questions to [email protected]

Print Options

Send Page to Printer

Print this page.

Download Page (PDF)

The PDF will include all information unique to this page.

Skip to content

School of Biological Sciences

  • College of Sciences

Search form

M.s. biology.

The School of Biological Sciences offers two distinct programs leading to the M.S. in Biology degree. The M.S. in Biology (non-thesis) is intended for students who need advanced training in some aspect of modern biology but do not intend to pursue a career in research. The M.S. in Biology (with thesis) is intended for students wishing to obtain a strong background in modern biology and independent research experience in preparation for a technician-level job or further training leading to the PhD in biology.

Quick Facts

  • Masters with Thesis offers research without full commitment to PhD program.
  • Masters students do not receive stipends or tuition waivers.

General Inquiries

  • Chung Kim Academic Program Coordinator Email  | 404.385.4240 | EBB2009

Areas of concentration:

  • Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior   including population and evolutionary ecology; community ecology; aquatic chemical ecology; ecological genomics; sensory ecology; evolution of development, behavior, and sociality; biological oceanography; environmental microbiology; theoretical ecology.
  • Molecular and Cell Biology   including eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell biology; molecular physiology; molecular biophysics and structural biology; animal, plant, and microbial molecular genetics; human genomics; molecular evolution.
  • Computational Biology and Bioinformatics   (with available   M.S.   and interdepartmental PhD   programs in Bioinformatics) focusing on DNA and protein sequence analysis; comparative genomic analysis; macromolecular structure modeling including protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, and protein-small molecule interactions; molecular evolution.

Masters (non-thesis) Program Overview:

Masters with thesis program overview:.

The Masters with Thesis in Biology requires 36 credit hours(for students starting their MS in Summer 2018) consisting of 12 hours of graduate-level coursework and thesis research hours performed under the mentorship of a faculty advisor and thesis committee. Up to 6 credit hours of coursework can be transferred from another institution, by negotiation upon entrance to the program. In order to be accepted into this program, a student must have the prior agreement of a faculty member in the School of Biological Sciences who will act as thesis advisor. Students who enter the M.S. (non-thesis) in Biology program can transfer to the M.S. with thesis program upon agreement from such an advisor and the graduate committee. It is possible, although challenging, to maintain part-time employment elsewhere while pursuing the M.S. with thesis degree in Biology.

Choosing between the Ph.D. and Masters Programs

Our graduate program is primarily focused on the PhD which prepares students for careers in scientific research and employment in academia, industry, or government. Students who are not yet sure of their interest in scientific research or are interested in other kinds of professional development should consider the M.S. degree in Biology or   Bioinformatics .

Georgia Tech provides application fee waivers to advance diversity, recognize outstanding undergraduate achievement, and engage prospective students in recruitment events where Georgia Tech is affiliated. Such fee waivers are currently available only to domestic applicants.

Georgia Tech Resources

  • Offices & Departments
  • News Center
  • Campus Calendar
  • Special Events
  • Institute Communications
  • Visitor Resources
  • Campus Visits
  • Directions to Campus
  • Visitor Parking Information
  • GTvisitor Wireless Network Information
  • Georgia Tech Global Learning Center
  • Georgia Tech Hotel & Conference Center
  • Barnes & Noble at Georgia Tech
  • Ferst Center for the Arts
  • Robert C. Williams Paper Museum

College of Sciences Social Links

Biology related research centers.

  • Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center
  • Center for Biologically Inspired Design
  • Center for Integrative Genomics
  • Center for NanoMAD
  • Center for Ribosomal Evolution and Adaptation
  • Center for the Study of Systems Biology
  • Integrated Cancer Research Center

Map of School of Biological Sciences | Georgia Institute of Technology | Atlanta, GA | Georgia Institute of Technology | Atlanta, GA

Georgia Institute of Technology School of Biological Sciences 950 Atlantic Drive Atlanta, GA 30332 Office: 404-894-3700 Fax: 404-894-0519

Georgia Institute of Technology North Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30332 404.894.2000

  • Emergency Information
  • Enable Accessibility
  • Legal & Privacy Information
  • Human Trafficking Notice
  • Title IX/Sexual Misconduct
  • Hazing Public Disclosures
  • Accessibility
  • Accountability
  • Accreditation

© Georgia Institute of Technology

closeup image of chips on a monitor board

Georgia Tech Is at the Leading Edge of Semiconductor Research

Smartphones. Kettles. MRI machines. LED lightbulbs. Cars. Almost every electronic device uses a semiconductor, a tiny silicon chip made of myriad transistors that can perform billions of computations in a second.

Researchers working on chip development in Georgia Tech's cleanroom, the largest of its kind in the southeast.

Semiconductors make our world run, but the industry faces a turning point. For decades, computer chip efficiency has doubled every two years, but that progress is slowing. To complicate the problem further, global demand for semiconductors threatens to outpace the supply. The U.S. has the opportunity to meet the growing need for chips — both by increasing domestic manufacturing and building up the workforce, which is at its lowest in decades. To bolster semiconductor research and manufacturing, in 2022, Congress passed the $52.7 billion bipartisan CHIPS and Science Act that President Joe Biden signed into law. New paradigms and pioneers are needed to make these critical advances.

Georgia Tech is playing a significant role in creating the next generation of chips, as the Institute is especially well positioned to innovate in the semiconductor field. All areas of the semiconductor stack — the components that build a chip, from hardware to artificial intelligence — are studied at Tech, and collaboration among faculty is a hallmark of its research enterprise. Such cooperation is necessary to build better chips, since they need to be reinvented in every layer of the stack.

“Because of our depth and breadth in all of these areas, Georgia Tech has enormous strength,” said Michael Filler , interim executive director of the Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology . “That’s why we're set up to help push the industry — and the country — forward.”

The innovation doesn’t stop with research, though. Georgia Tech is also growing the industry’s workforce. From summer camps for middle schoolers to teaching undergraduates how to use a cleanroom, Georgia Tech trains the people who will build the semiconductors of the future. Industry partnerships enable students to work on crucial real-world issues and find work in the field immediately. The Institute is also ensuring that the research expands far past the borders of campus by developing collaborations and mentorship with researchers at minority-serving institutions.  

“Because of our depth and breadth in all of these areas, Georgia Tech has enormous strength. That’s why we're set up to help push the industry — and the country — forward.”  —Michael Filler 

Explaining the Semiconductor Slowdown

Closeup image of chips in a Georgia Tech researcher's palm.

Since the 1950s, the number of transistors able to fit on a computer chip has doubled almost every two years, a concept known as Moore’s Law. However, this progress is lagging. To continue to innovate the current chip design takes considerable money and electrical power. The industry infrastructure to build these chips is also currently too weak to meet demand.

“We can keep making advances, but at what cost?” Filler said. “We struggle with fragile supply chains and constant security vulnerabilities.”

Since semiconductors are used in transportation, the military, and industry, security issues entail more than a manufacturing problem. “It’s not just a matter of economic security,” says George White , senior director of strategic partnerships for Research. White has worked in semiconductor research for 30 years. “It's also a matter of national security.”

Currently, the U.S. manufactures just 12% of the global semiconductor supply. The country now has a chance to help create a better chip — and, in the process, develop a new industry that employs millions of Americans.  

Georgia Tech researchers believe the key to pushing the field forward is creating a whole new type of chip. They can imagine these new, better chips designed in different layouts and with new materials like graphene or glass.  

Currently, the U.S. manufactures just 12% of the global semiconductor supply. The country now has a chance to help create a better chip — and, in the process, develop a new industry that employs millions of Americans. 

Researching Up and Down the Semiconductor Stack

Chip innovation happens at all levels: designing and building the circuits, creating applications for chips, and developing the chip’s packaging. Georgia Tech researchers work in each of these areas.

Professor Saibal Mukhopadhyay in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) directs CogniSense: Center on Cognitive Multispectral Sensors, which works on innovations in the semiconductor space. Similarly, Arijit Raychowdhury , ECE chair, directs the Center for the Co-Design of Cognitive Systems (CoCoSys), where his team plan to leverage chip design to strengthen AI capabilities and, eventually, build a humanlike interface capable of using the same five senses and intelligence humans do. “We want to innovate on the next generation of algorithms and hardware, to make AI more data - and hardware-efficient, as well as make AI models more transparent and comprehensible,” Raychowdhury said.

Callie Hao holds a FPGAA in a Georgia Tech nanotechnology lab.

ECE’s Callie Hao , an assistant professor, works in three areas of the semiconductor stack’s architectural level: optimizing machine learning to be more efficient on hardware, customizing hardware to run algorithms faster, and creating automation tools for hardware design. “We design the architecture or build the tools to facilitate the architecture design process,” she said. “We work on the layer above semiconductors so architects can better use the cutting-edge semiconductor technologies.”

Researchers in the College of Computing develop AI models optimized for efficient hardware execution. Celine Lin , an associate professor in the School of Computer Science , focuses on accelerating the development of efficient AI solutions. "My team and I are dedicated to enhancing the energy efficiency of AI solutions to optimize semiconductor usage while leveraging the powerful capabilities of AI models to expedite the development of semiconductor advancements," she explained.

Finally, advanced packaging pulls together different chips into a single, coherent, high-performance system. “If the chip is like the brain, then the packaging is like the body that protects it,” White said. Chips have traditionally been designed in two dimensions, but this limits their growth because a chip can take up only so much surface area before it consumes too much power to be effective.

Muhannad Bakir , a professor in ECE, is creating new packaging designs as director of the 3D Systems Packaging Research Center . “This new form of advanced packaging is often referred to as ‘heterogeneous integration,’” Bakir said. “The goal is to enable the interconnection of multiple chiplets of various functionalities to provide flexibility in fabrication and design, improved scalability, reduced development time, and reduced cost.”  

Building a Bigger, Better Workforce

To take advantage of these new technologies, a workforce that knows how to build and use these chips is vital. “What we need today are more generalists who can work across the stack,” said Tom Conte , associate dean for Research in computing and professor in both computer science and electrical and computer engineering. “If we seize the opportunity to train people who can think across the layers of the stack, we can really innovate.”

Georgia Tech is also a crucial part of such training. With 28,500 square feet of academic cleanroom space — one of the largest in the nation — open to faculty, students, and outside researchers in industry, everyone can get hands-on experience in all parts of chip fabrication. “Our facility sees about a thousand users every year,” Filler said. “We are training people on the same types of tools that they would use in the semiconductor industry.”

A researcher examining a chip in Georgia Tech's cleanroom, one of the largest of its kind in the U.S.

ECE is collaborating with industry leaders to ensure the curriculum aligns with what semiconductor research requires. “CHIPS is adding momentum to society,” Raychowdhury said. “The companies have realized that the workforce gap needs to be addressed. Now that many of these companies have received CHIPS funding, more students are interested in semiconductors, and they want to learn and work for these companies.”

Building up the talent pipeline is also a strategy for the Institute, from expanding who does research to growing the workforce. Georgia Tech is collaborating with historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and minority-serving institutions (MSIs) to build research partnerships and work on joint semiconductor projects that will bring more students into the field. “We need Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, and Spelman College — and we need the communities those schools serve,” White said.

To this end, Georgia Tech launched the   Research Collaboration Initiativ e (RCI) to develop these partnerships. The RCI kicked off with a research collaboration forum inviting HBCU representatives from across the nation in 2023, from which 17 grants were awarded. This group of 20-plus HBCUs conducts semiconductor research, while also engaging their local community colleges and K-12 schools in these efforts.

The talent pipeline for MSIs starts in K-12 and extends to two-year technical schools — and Georgia Tech is reaching out to everyone. “We need to embrace these students and show them that this industry offers a viable career path,” White said. One example of such early engagement is Chip Camp , a three-day STEM camp sponsored by Micron that offers sixth through eighth graders the opportunity to learn about the chip fabrication process and to see how a cleanroom works.  

“This is a pivotal moment for industry and education. It signals a renewed investment in the engineers and researchers who will lead us into the next era of technological achievement.”  —Celine Lin 

Investing in the Future

Georgia Tech’s objectives to improve semiconductor chips and build the workforce align with those of CHIPS.

“The CHIPS program will develop a unique collaboration ecosystem between federal and state governments, industry, national labs, and academia,” Bakir said. “Georgia Tech has a long history of partnering with these organizations; we look forward to continuing this partnership to explore a research agenda that meets the national needs for semiconductors and advanced packaging.” 

Georgia Tech’s efforts in industry, education, and research in the race to create better semiconductors will help power the future.

“This is a pivotal moment for industry and education,” Lin said. “It signals a renewed investment in the engineers and researchers who will lead us into the next era of technological achievement.”

georgia tech thesis

Writer : Tess Malone Media Contact : Tess Malone | [email protected]   Videos : Christopher McKenney  Photos : Christopher McKenney and Rob Felt  

Related Stories

A researcher holding a chip while in the Georgia Tech cleanroom, one of the largest of its kind in the U.S.

Graduate Education

Office of graduate and postdoctoral education, phd defense by sushil varma, may 17, 2024.

Title:  Stochastic Matching Networks: Theory and Applications to Matching Platforms.

In-Person Location:  Groseclose 402

Online Link: https://gatech.zoom.us/j/8543540167?omn=96789989066

Time:  12 pm - 2 pm, May 17, 2024 (Friday)

Thesis Committee Members

Dr. Siva Theja Maguluri (Advisor, ISyE, Georgia Tech)

Dr. Alan Erera (ISyE, Georgia Tech)

Dr. Robert Foley (ISyE, Georgia Tech)

Dr. He Wang (ISyE, Georgia Tech)

Dr. Ramandeep Randhawa (USC Marshall)

Dr. Amy Ward (U-Chicago Booth)

Traditional service-based marketplaces have now moved online with the emergence of platform economies. Examples include ride-hailing systems, meal and grocery delivery platforms, and EV-based transportation systems. In addition to such software-based platforms, recent technological breakthroughs are leading to networked matching platforms that match various virtual or physical entities—for example, matching payments in peer-to-peer payment channel networks. The focus of this thesis is on studying such matching platforms. 

While matching is a classical problem with rich literature in Economics and CS theory, throughput and delay in matching platforms with dynamic matching is not fully understood. We take the stochastic network viewpoint to model matching platforms as stochastic matching networks composed of matching queues. In contrast to classical queues with dedicated servers, both customers and servers arrive and depart in matching queues. It is a lot harder to analytically study such two-sided behavior, and classical queueing theory cannot be directly applied. In this thesis, we develop a theory of stochastic matching networks, providing a comprehensive understanding of throughput and delay in matching platforms. Hence, allowing us to design optimal control, e.g., matching decisions, that optimizes these objectives. 

This thesis is divided into three parts:

  • The first part, comprising three chapters, sets up the stage by developing the fundamentals of stochastic matching networks. This part of the thesis highlights our fundamental contributions, both theoretical and modeling, to stochastic matching networks.
  • The second part, comprising four chapters, develops optimal control for matching platforms by analyzing the models introduced in the previous part. Specifically, we consider applications to online marketplaces, EV-based transportation systems, and payment channel networks. Our results unravel fundamental trade-offs, providing key insights into the operations of these matching platforms.
  • The third part of the thesis shifts the focus to analyzing classical queueing analogs of the proposed stochastic matching networks. In particular, some of the novel aspects of stochastic matching networks motivated us to investigate new facets of their classical equivalents. These results contribute to and build upon the fundamentals of queueing theory. 

Accessibility Information

Download Microsoft Products   >      Download Adobe Reader   >

News Center

Advancing careers of interdisciplinary research faculty at georgia tech.

Tech Tower

Growing the careers of research faculty at Georgia Tech is an integral part of Research Next , the strategic plan for the Institute’s research enterprise.

Georgia Tech’s research faculty, who conduct vital research in labs, centers, and departments across campus, play a critical role in the research enterprise. To support these essential employees, Georgia Tech launched an initiative to recognize and develop its research faculty.

The Research Next team, now in the implementation phase of the plan, was tasked with finding ways to recognize, support, and retain research faculty. This included developing reference materials and workshops specifically designed to guide research faculty seeking promotions. These resources provide essential information on the advancement process, ensuring researchers are well-prepared to take the next step in their careers.

With this support and guidance, six researchers from the Interdisciplinary Research Institutes and other units reporting to the Vice President of Interdisciplinary Research applied for promotions. All six promotions were approved.

The following interdisciplinary researchers received promotions:

  • Devin Brown, principal research engineer, Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology
  • Michael Chang, principal research scientist, Brook Byers Institute for Sustainable Systems
  • Paramita Chatterjee, research scientist II, Marcus Center for Therapeutic Cell Characterization and Manufacturing
  • Evan Goldberg, principal research engineer, Laboratory for Synthetic Immunity and Global Center for Medical Innovation
  • Vrinda Nandan, research scientist II, Design Intelligence Lab and the National AI Institute for Adult Learning and Online Education
  • Sikka Harshvardhan, research scientist II, National AI Institute for Adult Learning and Online Education

In addition, the University System of Georgia’s Board of Regents has granted Leanne West, principal research scientist and the chief engineer of pediatric technologies at Georgia Tech, the prestigious distinction of Regents’ Researcher. As Chief Engineer, West coordinates research activities related to pediatrics across campus and serves as the technical liaison for the partnership with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

West’s research focuses on mobile and wireless health systems and sensor development, user interfaces, system integration, and diagnostic devices. She has seen her invention of a wireless personal captioning system installed at commercial venues through her start-up, Intelligent Access, LLC. She has another wearable system for identifying specific dog behaviors that has also reached the commercial market.

Laurie Haigh Research Communications

College of Engineering

At the leading edge of semiconductor research.

Georgia Tech is playing a significant role in creating the next generation of chips and training the workforce to innovate across all aspects of the semiconductor stack.

Georgia Tech to Advance Extended Reality Efforts

Georgia Tech is advancing efforts to responsibly integrate extended reality (XR) programs into its service offerings across academic, research, and administration spaces.  

XR collectively refers to virtual reality, augmented reality, and mixed reality technologies, which simulate or enhance real-world experiences. These technologies use computer-generated environments, digital augmentation of physical environments, and the blending of physical-digital elements to create an immersive experience. Common examples of XR devices include the Microsoft HoloLens, Meta Quest, and Apple Vision Pro headsets, commonly used for training, education entertainment, physical workouts, and gaming.  

Georgia Tech’s Office of Information Technology (OIT) has seen a demand in requests for XR capabilities from Tech students, faculty, and researchers looking to enrich the teaching and learning experience. OIT has previously partnered with the Invention Studio @ Georgia Tech to build out an interactive virtual tour of the studio leveraging Microsoft Mesh, a cloud-based platform that allows users in various physical locations to engage with each other and collaborate in a custom environment. OIT has also worked with faculty and student groups to explore immersive XR-based collaboration or co-design, the intersection of arts and XR, and an educational moon environment. 

“While the use of XR in support of teaching and learning is not new, we have seen a renewed interest in exploring the use of that technology," said Didier Contis, executive director of OIT's Academic Technology, Innovation, and Research Computing. "The interest of XR also extends to research activities, wellbeing, digital museums, and remote assistance. Likewise, as artificial intelligence (AI) becomes more infused in the way we work, we are also seeing an increase in the release of more powerful XR devices and platforms that incorporate AI.” 

With this growth in mind, the Academic Technology, Innovation, and Research Computing team is exploring ways to scale the use of XR effectively and responsibly. This includes keeping data privacy, security, and ethics top of mind.  

Contis added that institutions should be intentional in their efforts to advance XR at scale to avoid the perception of innovation stifling and bureaucratic approaches to implementation. It is our responsibility to lay the groundwork for developing an empowered institution that is fully prepared to embrace XR and other emerging technologies while keeping humans at the center of the effort. 

Next steps for advancing XR at Tech include developing communities of practice centered around campus early adopters and community leaders (including student organization eXtended Reality), establishing partnerships with units across campus, and creating learning and development opportunities for Institute student, faculty, and staff to experience XR. OIT also plans to collaborate with Institute partners to draft preliminary guidelines for the use of XR technology and services for instructional purposes.

Malynda Dorsey Smith Senior Director, IT Organizational Change Management & Communications

News room topics

Didier Contis, executive director of the Office of Information Technology's Academic Technology, Innovation, and Research Computing, recently co-authored a special Educause report, titled “ Navigating the XR Educational Landscape: Privacy, Safety, and Ethical Guidelines ,” which discusses XR integration and adoption within higher education and highlights risk mitigation recommendations for institutions. Co-authors also include Maya Georgieva, senior director of the Innovation Center XR, AI and Quantum Labs at The New School; Jeremy Nelson, director of the XR Initiative at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; and Ricky LaFosse, compliance and policy lead for Academic Innovation at University of Michigan-Ann Arbor.

  •  Contact

logo UPC

  • Do you want to study a bachelor's degree?
  • Available places
  • Reassessment
  • Computer Engineering
  • Software Engineering
  • Information Systems
  • Information Technologies
  • Competences
  • Competences for degree subjects
  • Upcoming defences
  • Thesis offers
  • Learning Outcomes
  • Do you want to study a Master Degree?
  • Academic Regulations
  • Advanced Computing
  • Computer Graphics and Virtual Reality
  • Computer Networks and Distributed Systems
  • Data Science
  • High Performance Computing
  • Service Engineering
  • Master in Cybersecurity
  • Gender Competency
  • Master in Pure and Applied Logic
  • Master in Computational Modelling in Physics, Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Administrative Procedures
  • Academic calendars
  • Extinct Curriculums
  • Academic stays
  • Research Visit
  • Mobility Calendar
  • Information Sessions
  • Mobility experiences
  • Before you leave
  • When you arrive
  • Before you return
  • When you return
  • Internship abroad
  • Other activities abroad
  • Double degrees
  • Mobility Programs
  • University Networks
  • Partner universities
  • Departments
  • Research Centers
  • Research Groups
  • Posting offers
  • Offers list
  • FIB Visiona
  • Sponsorship
  • The school in Figures
  • Computer Labs
  • Teaching laboratories
  • Group work classroom
  • Auditorium Manuel Martí Recober
  • Conference Room
  • Rector Gabriel Ferraté Library
  • How to study remotely
  • Service catalog
  • IT Guide for new students
  • Campus Nord Hybrid Classrooms
  • Associations
  • Internal Quality Assurance System
  • Qualification assessment
  • Statistical data
  • FIB Quality policy and goals
  • CERN (Conseil Européen pour le Recherche Nucléaire)
  • Latin America
  • National Institute of Informatics (NII) Tokyo
  • USA grant programs
  • Automatic Control
  • Computer Architecture
  • Computer Science
  • Mathematics
  • Services and Information System Engineering
  • Statistics and Operations Research
  • BSC-CNS - Barcelona Supercomputing Center
  • CCABA – Advanced Broadband Communications Center
  • CEBIM - Molecular Biotechnology Centre
  • CREB - Research Centre for Biomedical Engineering
  • CRnE - Center for Research in NanoEngineering
  • IDEAI - Intelligent Data Science and Artificial Intelligence Research Center
  • TALP - Center for Language and Speech Technologies and Applications
  • ALBCOM - Algorithms, Computational Biology, Complexity and Formal Methods
  • ARCO - Architectures and Compilers
  • CAP - High Performace Computing Group
  • CBA - Broadband Communications Systems
  • CNDS - Computer Networks and Distributed Systems
  • DAMA-UPC - Data Management Group
  • DCCG - Research group on discrete, combinatorial and computational geometry
  • DMAG - Distributed Multimedia Applications Group
  • GESSI - Group of Software and Service Engineering
  • GIE - Engineering Informatics Group
  • GNOM - Group of Numerical Optimization and Modelling
  • GPLN - Natural Language Processing Group
  • GRBIO - Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Research Group
  • GREC - Knowledge Engineering Research Group
  • GRINS - Intelligent Robots and Systems
  • KEMLG - Knowledge Engineering and Machine Learning Group
  • LARCA - Relational Algorithmics, Complexity and Learning Laboratory
  • LOGPROG - Logic and Programming
  • MD - Discrete Mathematics
  • MPI - Information Modelling & Processing
  • SIMCON - Computer Simulation in Condensed Matter Research Group
  • SOCO - Soft Computing
  • SUSHITOS - Services for Ubiquitous Social and Humanistic Information Technologies and Open Source Research Group
  • VIS - Vision and Intelligent Systems
  • ViRVIG - Visualisation, Virtual Reality and Graphic Interaction Research Group
  • H2020 - BIG IoT
  • eHealth Eurocampus
  • Jedi Mobile Apps Lab
  • Social Point Lab
  • School Board
  • Standing Committee
  • A5S104 Social Point Lab

Georgia Tech

You are here.

logo GeorgiaTech

  • Available for FIB students of the MDS and MIRI degrees
  • 1st year: 2 semesters (September – June) at UPC (60 ECTS)
  • Autumn semester: 30 ECTS at GT Europe Campus
  • Spring semester: Master Thesis at UPC
  • 5th semester (autumn): 30 ECTS at GT Atlanta Campus
  • Classes in English
  • When the studies are finalized, two titles are obtained: the Master in Data Science (MDS) or the Master in Innovation and Research in Informatics (MIRI), from FIB, and the Master of Science in Computer Science (“CS”), from Georgia Tech.
  • During the semesters at GT Europe and GT Atlanta (3rd and 5th semester), enrolment taxes are paid at destination, as well as transport, housing, and daily expenses. During the other semesters, enrolment taxes are paid at UPC.
  • 1 st course of MDS or MIRI must have been passed
  • Minimum GPA of 3.5/4.0 (GPA = General Point Average)
  • Strong recommendation letters
  • Verbal > 153/170
  • Quantitative > 155/170
  • Analytical Writing > 3/6
  • IELTS≥ 7.5 (minimum grades of 6.5 in Reading, Listening and Speaking sections, and 5.5 in Writing section)
  • TOEFL iBT ≥ 90 (each section must have 19 points or above)
  • TOEIC > 850

Available advantages:

Atlanta Campus:

  • Teaching Assistantships available on a competitive basis in Computer Science: Tuition waiver with ~2,000 $ monthly stipend.

Europe Campus:

  • Teaching assistantship available, tuition waiver or 66% tuition waiver.

Where we are

[email protected]

georgia tech thesis

Contact with us

© Facultat d'Informàtica de Barcelona - Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya - Website Disclaimer - Privacy Settings

US committee targets Georgia Tech's alleged ties to Chinese military linked research

  • Medium Text

U.S. Secretary of State Blinken visits China

Sign up here.

Reporting by Michael Martina Editing by Alistair Bell

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. New Tab , opens new tab

Michael Cohen departs to testify at Trump’s criminal trial in New York

World Chevron

Aftermath of an Israeli strike on a house in Nuseirat, central Gaza Strip

Israeli tanks push into Gaza's Rafah, as battles rage in the north

Israeli tanks forged deeper into eastern Rafah on Tuesday, reaching some residential districts of the southern border city where more than a million people had been sheltering, raising fears of yet further civilian casualties.

Hooded man holds a laptop computer as cyber code is projected on him in this illustration picture

A U.S. ban on imports of enriched uranium from Russia will take effect on Aug. 11, the Department of Energy said on Tuesday.

St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF)

French authorities launched a major manhunt on Tuesday after gunmen in balaclavas ambushed a prison van in northern France to free a drug dealer known as "The Fly," killing two prison guards in the process and severely wounding three others.

IMAGES

  1. Georgia Tech Essay

    georgia tech thesis

  2. Dissertation Template for Georgia Institute of Technology Template

    georgia tech thesis

  3. georgia tech research corporation

    georgia tech thesis

  4. Thesis Template for Georgia Institute of Technology Template

    georgia tech thesis

  5. Georgia Tech Essay Help. Georgia Tech Essay Examples See 2021 Analysis

    georgia tech thesis

  6. Fillable Online grad gatech Thesis Errata Sheet Request

    georgia tech thesis

COMMENTS

  1. Theses & Dissertations

    All theses and dissertations authored by Georgia Tech graduate students are openly shared and preserved via the GT Digital Repository. Theses and dissertations published 2004 to the present are openly accessible. Those published prior to 2004 are available to the Georgia Tech community only, unless permission to make them openly available has been given by the author (to grant permission to ...

  2. Vireo Thesis and Dissertation Submital System

    Welcome to Georgia Tech's system for submitting your graduate thesis or dissertation. Undergraduate Research Option Theses are submitted here as well. Once you have passed the final defense and satisfied the requirements of the committee, you are ready to submit your manuscript to the Thesis Office for review. This submission process is fully ...

  3. SMARTech: Georgia Tech Theses and Dissertations

    All Georgia Tech theses and dissertations are available electronically through this collection, which also contains dissertations from the former Institute of Paper Science and Technology. ... Georgia Tech Library 260 4th Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332 +1 404.894.4500 Campus map This is an external link. General; My Account; Contact Us; Directory ...

  4. PDF Thesis and Dissertation Manual

    Questions regarding the format of theses/dissertations not adequately answered in this handbook should be directed to: Ofice of Graduate Education Georgia Institute of Technology 631 Cherry Street Savant Building, Suite 318 Atlanta, GA 30332-0215. 404.894.6811 [email protected]. Ofice hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

  5. Thesis and Dissertation Policy

    A policy of the Georgia Institute of Technology is that Doctoral and Master's Theses are openly published. Extraordinary delays are not to be allowed to protect the proprietary interests of sponsors. It is anticipated that all Ph.D. theses and a significant fraction of master's theses be published in the open, refereed literature.

  6. About the Georgia Tech Digital Repository

    Since 2004, Georgia Tech has required all theses and dissertations be submitted electronically, with the electronic copy of record being housed in the Georgia Tech Digital Repository. Every Georgia Tech student submitting a thesis or dissertation is required to sign the repository license agreement. This agreement assigns a non-exclusive ...

  7. Dissertations

    Here is the complete list of all doctoral dissertations granted by the School of Math, which dates back to 1965. Included below are also all masters theses produced by our students since 2002. A combined listing of all dissertations and theses, going back to 1934, is available at Georgia Tech's library archive.

  8. PDF Writing Your Own Success: Theses and Dissertations at Georgia Tech

    •Check your format with the Graduate Thesis Office at least 10 days prior to the deadline via email as a PDF to [email protected] •Adhere to format in the manual available on the Theses and Dissertations portion of the Graduate Education website (www.grad.gatech.edu). •Submit the following forms (via DocuSign) available on the Theses and

  9. Senior Thesis

    The product of Psyc 4600 is a research proposal for the work to be completed in Psyc 4601 (Senior Thesis II). For the second (typically, Spring) semester, the student would register for 4 hours of Psyc 4601 (Senior Thesis). This approach would recognize the reality of the time involved in preparing and carrying out a senior thesis.

  10. Georgia Tech Library

    The Georgia Tech Library announced in March that Liz Holdsworth is the new Head of Academic Engagement. March 25, 2024. Explore Library Impact in 2023 ... Theses & Dissertations GT Digital Repository Info for Faculty & Instructors Teaching & Learning; Instruction Support Textbook Affordability & OER ...

  11. Student Research

    All Georgia Tech theses and dissertations are available electronically through the Georgia Tech institutional repository. Theses and dissertations published 2004 to the present are openly accessible. You can search for School of Economics papers in the repository or submit a paper or dissertation to the repository.

  12. Applied Research Papers & Master's Theses

    This page showcases selected applied research papers and theses that were completed in recent years. For a complete archive, please visit the SMARTech collection hosted by the Georgia Tech Library. Applied Research Papers Theses. Applied Research Papers. 2023 Applied Research Papers. Brennan, Laurence. "America ...

  13. Open Access

    Georgia Tech is committed to disseminating our research and scholarship as widely as possible. To that end, the Faculty passed the Georgia Tech Open Access Policy, which took effect Jan 1, 2013 and is incorporated into the faculty handbook. ... Examples of excluded content include books, course materials, theses, student-only publications ...

  14. Research and Innovation

    This must be uploaded to the Georgia Tech online thesis database by the last day of finals of the students graduating semester. ... Georgia Tech strongly encourages students to explore research and innovation in practical ways. The Student Innovation program (SIp) fosters growth by giving students the opportunity to engage with one another ...

  15. M.S. Biology

    The Masters with Thesis in Biology requires 36 credit hours(for students starting their MS in Summer 2018) consisting of 12 hours of graduate-level coursework and thesis research hours performed under the mentorship of a faculty advisor and thesis committee. ... Georgia Tech provides application fee waivers to advance diversity, recognize ...

  16. Georgia Tech Is at the Leading Edge of Semiconductor Research

    Georgia Tech is playing a significant role in creating the next generation of chips, as the Institute is especially well positioned to innovate in the semiconductor field. All areas of the semiconductor stack — the components that build a chip, from hardware to artificial intelligence — are studied at Tech, and collaboration among faculty is a hallmark of its research enterprise.

  17. PhD Defense by Sushil Varma

    Thesis Committee Members. Dr. Siva Theja Maguluri (Advisor, ISyE, Georgia Tech) Dr. Alan Erera (ISyE, Georgia Tech) Dr. Robert Foley (ISyE, Georgia Tech) Dr. He Wang (ISyE, Georgia Tech) Dr. Ramandeep Randhawa (USC Marshall) Dr. Amy Ward (U-Chicago Booth) Abstract

  18. Advancing Careers of Interdisciplinary Research Faculty at Georgia Tech

    Growing the careers of research faculty at Georgia Tech is an integral part of Research Next, the strategic plan for the Institute's research enterprise.Georgia Tech's research faculty, who conduct vital research in labs, centers, and departments across campus, play a critical role in the research enterprise. To support these essential employees, Georgia Tech launched an initiative to ...

  19. Dissertation Defense Room

    Is limited to Georgia Tech PhD dissertation and Master's theses defenses; Is a free, self-service space with technology capabilities to video conference with remote committee members, livestream, and record; Is reservable for a four-hour time slots Monday-Thursday & one practice time Time slot 1 is 8:00am-12:00pm; Time slot 2 is 1:00-5:00pm

  20. At the Leading Edge of Semiconductor Research

    At the Leading Edge of Semiconductor Research. Georgia Tech is playing a significant role in creating the next generation of chips and training the workforce to innovate across all aspects of the semiconductor stack. By: Tess Malone ([email protected]) Thursday, 09 May 2024. Georgia Tech Research News.

  21. Georgia Tech to Advance Extended Reality Efforts

    Apr 13, 2024. Georgia Tech is advancing efforts to responsibly integrate extended reality (XR) programs into its service offerings across academic, research, and administration spaces. XR collectively refers to virtual reality, augmented reality, and mixed reality technologies, which simulate or enhance real-world experiences.

  22. Georgia Tech

    Spring semester: Master Thesis at UPC. 5th semester (autumn): 30 ECTS at GT Atlanta Campus. Classes in English. When the studies are finalized, two titles are obtained: the Master in Data Science (MDS) or the Master in Innovation and Research in Informatics (MIRI), from FIB, and the Master of Science in Computer Science ("CS"), from Georgia ...

  23. US committee targets Georgia Tech's alleged ties to Chinese military

    Georgia Tech partnered with China's northeastern Tianjin University on cutting edge technologies despite its documented ties to the People's Liberation Army (PLA), John Moolenaar, the new ...