Writing Beginner

How to Describe Birds in Writing (17 Best Tips & Examples)

Let’s spread our creative wings together and explore the art of describing birds in our writing.

Here is how to describe birds in writing:

Describe birds in writing by focusing on their feathers, songs, movements, and behaviors. Use vivid words like “iridescent” or phrases like “wings slicing the air”. Employ sensory descriptions, symbolic meanings, and cultural contexts to bring avian characters to life in your narratives.

Keep reading to learn everything you need to know to write about birds in your stories.

Types of Birds in Writing

Colorful parrot image for a blog post about how to describe birds in writing

Table of Contents

Birds, with their vast diversity and striking characteristics, offer a rich palette for writers to paint vibrant scenes and convey emotions.

From tiny, flitting hummingbirds to majestic eagles soaring high, each bird carries its own symbolism and narrative potential.

In this section, we’ll explore a variety of bird types, each with a brief description that captures their essence, providing a broad canvas for writers to draw inspiration from.

  • Sparrows – Small and unassuming, sparrows symbolize simplicity and the joy found in everyday life.
  • Eagles – Majestic and powerful, eagles are often used to depict freedom, strength, and a bird’s-eye perspective on life.
  • Hummingbirds – Tiny and energetic, hummingbirds represent joy, agility, and the incredible beauty of small things.
  • Owls – Mysterious and wise, owls often symbolize knowledge, the unseen, and the secrets of the night.
  • Robins – Cheerful and common, robins are harbingers of spring and symbols of renewal and new beginnings.
  • Peacocks – Vibrant and flamboyant, peacocks epitomize beauty, pride, and the splendor of nature.
  • Crows – Intelligent and adaptable, crows often represent transformation, adaptability, and the mysteries of life.
  • Pigeons – Ubiquitous and resilient, pigeons are seen as symbols of peace, love, and the persistence of life in urban landscapes.
  • Swans – Graceful and elegant, swans are often used to represent love, purity, and the beauty of monogamy.
  • Canaries – Bright and vocal, canaries symbolize happiness, the power of voice, and sometimes, a warning.
  • Penguins – Endearing and unique, penguins represent adaptability, survival, and the joys of companionship.
  • Flamingos – Striking and social, flamingos symbolize balance, community, and embracing one’s uniqueness.
  • Parrots – Colorful and vocal, parrots often stand for communication, mimicry, and the vibrancy of the tropics.
  • Vultures – Misunderstood scavengers, vultures symbolize cleansing, renewal, and the cycle of life.
  • Doves – Gentle and serene, doves are universally recognized as emblems of peace, hope, and spiritual messengers.
  • Hawks – Focused and fierce, hawks represent vision, power, and the ability to navigate life’s challenges.
  • Seagulls – Noisy and free-spirited, seagulls embody the spirit of the sea, freedom, and a carefree lifestyle.
  • Woodpeckers – Persistent and rhythmic, woodpeckers symbolize determination, opportunity, and the heartbeat of the forest.
  • Cardinals – Vibrant and spirited, cardinals represent vitality, faith, and the beauty of year-round color.
  • Blue Jays – Bold and vocal, blue jays symbolize assertiveness, intelligence, and the vibrancy of life.

17 Best Tips for Describing Birds in Writing

Describing birds in your writing can be a mesmerizing way to add depth, texture, and symbolism.

Whether it’s the delicate flutter of a sparrow or the majestic soar of an eagle, birds can bring a unique dimension to your narrative.

Here are 17 bird-themed tips to help you weave vivid avian imagery into your writing.

Each tip is explored in detail, offering you the tools to make your descriptions take flight.

1. Feathered Flourish – Focus on Feathers

Feathers define birds. When describing them, delve into their color, texture, and what they reveal about the bird’s persona.

For example, depicting a sparrow’s feathers could go beyond mere color.

You might say, “The sparrow’s feathers seemed brushed by twilight; each a small canvas capturing the soft glow of the setting sun.”

This not only paints a vivid picture but also introduces a sensory aspect.

It links the bird to the broader canvas of the natural world, allowing readers to feel the warmth, see the hues, and sense the bird’s place in the world.

This attention to detail can turn a simple description into an evocative image that stays with the reader.

2. Melodic Metaphors – Use Birdsong

Birdsong is more than a sound; it’s an emotion.

When describing it, use metaphors and similes to create an emotional connection.

Rather than saying a robin chirps, you might describe its song as “a melody rippling like a gentle brook, cutting through the quiet of dawn.”

This method transcends mere auditory description.

It paints a picture, sets a mood, and plunges the reader into a moment.

It’s about crafting a scene that’s almost palpable, using the bird’s song as a tool to transport the reader to that tranquil morning, where they can almost feel the coolness of the dawn and the serenity it brings.

3. Winged Whimsy – Capture Movement

A bird’s movement can be highly expressive.

Whether it’s an eagle’s dignified glide or a hummingbird’s frenetic dance, capturing this can add dynamism to your writing.

Consider a description like, “The hummingbird hovered in the air, its wings a blur, as if stitching the very fabric of time.”

This kind of imagery does more than describe movement.

It infuses the bird with a magical quality, making it a creature not just of feathers and flight but of wonder and fantasy.

Descriptions like this elevate the bird from a mere creature to a symbol, a bearer of meaning, and an entity that transcends the ordinary.

4. Aerial Acrobatics – Highlight Flight Patterns

Flight patterns can reveal a lot about a bird’s nature and the mood of a scene.

For instance, describing an eagle’s flight can convey majesty and power.

You might write, “The eagle ascended with a regal ease, each wingbeat a testament to its dominion over the skies.”

This goes beyond the physical act of flying. It touches on the eagle’s symbolic power, portraying it as a ruler of its realm.

It’s about capturing the grace, the strength, and the sheer majesty of its flight.

Descriptions like these can elevate your narrative, turning a simple action into a powerful metaphor that reflects broader themes or emotions in your writing.

5. Nest Narratives – Describe Bird Habitats

Bird habitats can set the scene and context for your narrative.

Describing a nest, a tree hollow, or even a cliff ledge can add authenticity.

You could say, “The sparrow’s nest, a woven tapestry of twigs and leaves, cradled the tree’s nook, a testament to nature’s ingenuity.”

This type of description does more than just portray a physical location.

It gives insight into the bird’s life and survival.

It can create a sense of intimacy, pulling the reader closer to the bird’s world, and highlighting the intricate connections between creatures and their environments.

6. Beak Banter – Focus on Vocalizations and Calls

Bird calls and vocalizations can be very expressive.

Describing these can add auditory texture to your writing. For example, instead of just stating a crow cawed, you could write, “The crow’s call was a harsh caw, echoing like a laugh across the empty fields.”

This captures the nature of the sound and its impact on the setting.

It’s not just about what the sound is, but how it resonates with the environment and the characters.

It can set a mood, be it ominous, cheerful, or soothing.

The key is to use these sounds not just as background noise, but as active elements that contribute to the atmosphere of your scene.

7. Plumage Palette – Explore Colors and Patterns

The colors and patterns of a bird’s plumage can be striking.

Describing these can add visual vibrancy to your narrative.

Take a peacock for example. Instead of simply stating its feathers are colorful, try, “The peacock’s tail unfurled like a kaleidoscopic fan, each feather a vibrant brushstroke of nature’s palette.”

This kind of description paints a vivid picture.

It turns the bird into a living work of art, inviting readers to visualize not just the colors, but the beauty and intricacy of the patterns.

It’s about capturing the awe and wonder such a sight can evoke, making the reader pause and appreciate the natural splendor.

8. Avian Antics – Capture Characterful Behavior

Birds often display unique and characterful behaviors that can enliven your writing.

Describing these antics provides insight into their personalities.

For example, a raven solving a puzzle or a bowerbird decorating its nest demonstrates intelligence and resourcefulness.

Writing such as, “The raven, with a click of its beak, nudged the puzzle piece into place, its black eyes glinting with a hint of glee,” invites readers into the bird’s world.

It’s about painting a fuller picture, showcasing birds not just as animals but as beings with their quirks, habits, and intelligence.

By bringing these behaviors to the fore, you can add another layer to your narrative and engage your readers on a deeper level.

9. Sensory Symphony – Engage All Senses

Engaging all the senses can make your bird descriptions more immersive.

Describe not just how a bird looks, but how its feathers feel, how its movement sounds, or even how its habitat smells.

For instance, “The duck’s feathers were a tapestry of textures, from the silkiness of its undercoat to the oil-slicked toughness of its outer quills.”

By involving multiple senses, you can create a richer, multi-dimensional portrayal of birds.

It’s about giving the reader a sense as if they’re experiencing the bird’s presence firsthand, making the encounter with the bird more vivid and memorable.

10. Behavioral Beacon – Signal Seasonal Changes

Bird behaviors often change with the seasons, and this can be a poignant aspect to capture.

Migratory patterns, mating dances, or nesting can signal the passage of time in your story.

Describing these seasonal behaviors, like “With the first blush of spring, the robin returned, its song a cheerful herald of warmer days,” can add layers of depth to your setting.

It aligns the life of birds with the rhythm of the natural world, providing a backdrop that can reflect changes in your story or the internal states of your characters.

11. Symbolic Soaring – Use Birds as Symbols

Birds have rich symbolic meanings across cultures.

They can symbolize freedom, hope, or even foreboding. Integrate these symbols into your writing to add a layer of meaning.

For example, an owl in a story might not only be a background creature but also a symbol of wisdom or a harbinger of change.

“The owl perched silently above, its presence a solemn reminder of the wisdom that comes with age and experience,” illustrates how you can weave symbolism into your description.

This allows the bird to embody deeper themes and resonate with the reader on a symbolic level.

12. Dynamic Duos – Contrast with Characters

Use birds to create contrast or to mirror your characters’ journeys.

A caged bird can reflect a character’s own trapped situation or desire for freedom.

For example, “As she watched the caged finch flutter against the bars, its plight echoed her own sense of confinement.”

This approach does more than depict the bird; it uses the bird as a reflection of the character’s emotions and circumstances, offering a powerful emotional connection and a mirror to human experiences.

13. Rhythmic Renderings – Mimic Bird Movement in Prose

The rhythm of your prose can reflect the movement of birds.

Long, flowing sentences can mimic the graceful soaring of a swan, while short, choppy sentences can echo the flitting of a finch.

For instance, “The heron glided over the water—a slow, seamless waltz—its reflection a ghostly dance partner below.”

By mirroring the rhythm of bird movements in your sentence structure, you provide the reader with a literary echo of the bird’s physical grace.

This creates a harmonious reading experience that’s almost like watching the bird in motion.

14. Habitat Harmony – Align Descriptions with Environment

Birds are deeply connected to their habitats, and reflecting this in your descriptions can add authenticity.

Describe how a bird interacts with its environment, like a woodpecker tapping into a tree or a seagull wheeling over the ocean.

You might write, “The woodpecker drummed against the old oak, a staccato rhythm that seemed to breathe life into the forest.”

Such descriptions root the bird in its setting, giving a sense of place and showing the interconnectedness of nature’s tapestry.

15. Perspective Play – Vary Your Viewpoint

Changing your narrative perspective can offer a fresh angle on bird descriptions.

Describe a bird from far away, then up close, or even from the bird’s perspective. For example, “From afar, the hawk was a mere speck against the vast blue. Up close, every feather was a detail in a masterpiece of evolution.”

This technique can add depth and scale to your descriptions, offering a richer visual experience and drawing readers into the scene more effectively.

16. Emotional Echo – Reflect Mood through Birds

Birds can be used to echo the emotional landscape of your story.

A joyful scene might be accompanied by the lively chatter of sparrows, while a somber moment could be underscored by the solitary call of a crow.

Writing that “The crows’ solemn cries seemed to mourn the day’s end, as shadows gathered in the silence,” can tie the atmosphere closely to the narrative, using the birds to deepen the emotional impact of your scenes.

17. Cultural Context – Weave in Folklore and Myth

Birds often have a place in folklore and myth, and tapping into these stories can add a layer of richness to your writing.

Integrate cultural stories or myths about birds to give your descriptions a deeper resonance.

“The raven, long a harbinger of fate in local lore, watched from atop the church spire, its black eyes knowing.”

This not only gives your bird descriptions a more profound significance but also ties them to the cultural and historical context of your setting.

Check out this video about how to describe birds in writing:

30 Best Words to Describe a Bird in Writing

Here are 30 of the best words to talk about birds in writing.

  • Plumage-rich
  • Resplendent

Each of these words holds the power to conjure a specific image or feeling about birds.

Use them to craft descriptions with precision and emotion.

Moving beyond single words, crafting phrases that reflect the nuanced behaviors and attributes of birds can add an evocative layer to your writing.

30 Best Phrases to Describe a Bird in Writing

The following phrases blend imagery and emotion, ideal for enhancing your narratives with finely-tuned bird descriptions:

  • Wings slicing the air
  • Beak glistening at dawn
  • Tail feathers fanning out like rays of the sun
  • Eyes gleaming with intelligence
  • Song piercing the morning haze
  • Silhouette against the twilight sky
  • Claws gripping the branch with silent authority
  • Nest cradled in the crook of a tree
  • Feathers ruffled by the whispering wind
  • Shadow flitting across the ground
  • Plumage blending with the autumn leaves
  • Beating wings stirring the calm air
  • Calls echoing in the forest canopy
  • Flight cutting through the mist
  • Dance of courtship, intricate and full of zeal
  • Reflection skimming the surface of the lake
  • Perched like a sentinel atop the old pine
  • Darting through the underbrush
  • A flash of color in the verdant meadow
  • Aloft in the updraft, effortlessly suspended
  • A symphony of calls at dusk
  • The soft cooing at day’s end
  • Feathers coated in the morning’s dew
  • A swift chase over the water’s surface
  • Migratory arc etched across the sky
  • Preening meticulously, every feather an artifact
  • The sudden stillness before the strike
  • A solitary silhouette on a weathered fence post
  • Inquisitive gaze from within the thicket
  • The serene float on a tranquil pond

3 Examples of How to Describe Birds in Writing (in three Different Genres)

Let’s look at examples of how to describe birds in writing in different kinds of stories.

Fantasy Genre: The Enchanted Eagle

In the twilight-shrouded realm of Eldoria, the Great Eagle, guardian of the Whispering Woods, unfurled its shimmering wings. Each feather shimmered with ethereal light, casting prismatic glows against the gnarled branches of the ancient trees. With eyes like molten gold piercing through the dusk, the creature let out a call that sang of ancient magic and secrets untold. Its talons, relics of a bygone era, grasped the mystical Stone of Sight, which pulsed in harmony with its heartbeat. The Eagle soared upwards, the air around it alive with whispers of enchantment, its majestic form a silhouette against the canvas of the constellations.

Mystery Genre: The Clue of the Crimson Cardinal

Detective Lila Grey stood motionless, the crunch of the autumn leaves underfoot breaking the silence of the morning. Her gaze fixed on the flash of red that flitted above the crime scene—a cardinal, its vibrant plumage a stark contrast to the somber mood. The bird’s keen eyes seemed to scrutinize the area, darting from the body to the blood-stained note left behind. As it sang a trilling melody, Lila pondered if the cardinal was an unwitting witness to the misdeed. The way it circled, almost protectively, around the oak tree, hinted at a secret only this avian bystander knew.

Romance Genre: The Dance of the Doves

Amidst the gentle hum of the garden party, two doves cooed softly, their gentle ballet a mirror to Eleanor and Thomas’s newfound love. The birds, with their silken white feathers, glided side by side, wings almost touching, embodying the tenderness shared between the two hearts below. As the pair nuzzled beak to beak, so too did Eleanor and Thomas lean in for their first, shy kiss, their audience of doves bearing witness to the silent promise of enduring affection. In the soft glow of dusk, the lovers and doves alike were wrapped in the warm embrace of a love as pure as the driven snow.

Final Thoughts: How to Describe Birds in Writing

With feathers unfurled and tales told, remember that the sky’s the limit when describing our avian friends in writing.

And if this flight of fancy has your creativity soaring, wing your way through our trove of articles for more literary inspiration.

Read This Next:

  • How to Describe a Beach in Writing (21 Best Tips & Examples)
  • How to Describe a Bed in Writing (10+ Tips and Examples)
  • How to Describe a Train in Writing (30+ Words & Examples)
  • How to Describe a Dog in Writing (100+ Examples)

Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (Research on Birds)

JournalBuddies.com

JournalBuddies.com

Journal Buddies Jill | April 3, 2024 March 20, 2023 | List of Prompts

25 Creative Writing Prompts About Birds

If you’re looking for creative writing prompts about birds, you’ve come to the right place. We’ve got dozens of ideas for you to use in stories, poems, journaling, essays, and more. Read on to learn more.

Creative Writing Prompts about Birds

There are reasons games like Angry Birds have become cultural icons. Typically, it’s because people are fascinated by the idea of winged creatures soaring in the sky above us. Yeppers! Birds are a fascinating topic for anyone and kids seem to especially love them.

Now, learning to write about birds can help aspiring writers in many ways.

Let’s take a look quickly at some of the top reasons why writing about birds is so wonderful. And then I’ll share with you some writing prompts about birds. You see…

Writing about birds can help a writer expand their vocabulary in new ways. Pro tip: Google the phrase “bird vocabulary words”.

Additionally….

Writers can use birds as characters in fictional pieces. After all, who doesn’t like reading a story about a penguin waddling through the snow trying to find its parents?

Further, writers may choose to use birds in their stories for allegorical purposes. In other words, birds may be used as symbolism in various ways in story writing.

For instance, some writers will will use birds chirping loudly to signal the start of something promising. Likewise, others may opt to describe the sky as being filled with crows as they depict something ominous in their writing. These are just two of the endless ways birds may be used to enhance one’s story in new and interesting ways.

Whether you’re writing poems, notebook entries, or short stories about birds, these prompts will help you considerably. Take a look now and enjoy!

Write an exchange between a talking parrot and a pirate captain. 

A family of birds is migrating when a strong gust of wind knocks the baby bird out of the sky. Write a story about the little bird searching for and reuniting with its family. (You could use famous movies like Finding Nemo as inspiration.)

Write a story about a high school student whose best friend is a talking owl.

Develop a story around an owl leaving its nest at night to go on an adventure.

Base a story around a group of penguins in Antarctica having an underwater swimming contest.

Write and dedicate a poem to your favorite bird species. 

Explain in detail which species of large birds you like the most and why.

Write a story about an a character you create partnering with a large eagle to find hidden treasures in the Caribbean. 

Explain why kids are typically so fascinated by birds.

You find an injured bird in your backyard. How do you help it?

Let your creative juices flow by imagining and penning a conversation between a group of frogs and a falcon.

What would your wings look like if you could snap your fingers and turn into a bird at will?

You’re playing in the schoolyard when you find golden feathers. What do you do?

Bird Creative Writing Topics

You’re swimming in the ocean with your friends when you notice a crow dive down for a closer look. What happens next?

You feed a bird some food and thereafter it keeps following you everywhere. You bring it home, but your mom says you can’t keep the bird. How do you convince her to change her mind?

Write some story ideas in your notebook about a bird that has lost its happiness and must regain it.

You’re trekking in the forest when you get lost. Suddenly, the wise old owl starts talking, startling you. Continue this prompt idea.

You’re swimming in the ocean. You see thousands of birds flocking to the coast. Write about what you think is attracting the birds.

A pigeon enters the king’s castle with a small note tied to its leg. It has a very important message. What does it say?

The world’s richest man invites you to his headquarters. He says he can create a jetpack to let you fly like your favorite bird. Which bird do you choose?

Write a journal entry about feeling as free as a bird. 

Detail a bird’s journey as it migrates during the winter.

A pigeon flies into a bakery and sneakily eats the baker’s bread. Write a story about the pigeon avoiding detection.

You’re in your local park when you find a dozen unhatched eggs. They’re the size of your head. Suddenly, you hear a sound. Continue this prompt.

Imagine you’re a sparrow who is best friends with an eagle. Write a story about your friendship.

I hope you enjoyed our list of creative writing prompts about birds.

Now, check out these…

Fabulous Writing Resources

  • 47 Free Ocean Writing Ideas to Inspire
  • 34 Nature Writing Prompts for Kids
  • 15 Writing Prompts about Pets
  • 37 Reflective Writing Prompts about Reading

Ok, that’s all for today.

Until next time, write on…

If you enjoyed these  Writing Prompts about Birds … please share them on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Pinterest. I appreciate it!

Sincerely, Jill journalbuddies.com creator and curator

Creative Writing Ideas about Birds

PS – take a look at the 10 Best Children’s Books About Birds !

Tap to See Prompts 70 Fun and Creative Nature Writing Prompts Writing about Pets - 15 Fun Pet Writing Topics 47 Free Ocean Writing Ideas to Inspire ------------Start of Om Added --------- @media (min-width: 320px) and (max-width: 767px) { .inside-right-sidebar { display: none !important; } } Search Now Offering You 18,000+ Prompts!

Jill -- Owner and Curator of JournalBuddies.com

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Teacher's Notepad

11 Writing Prompts about Birds

The majestic eagle soaring high above the world, looking down with its keen eye, searching…

There are plenty of interesting and inspiring writing topics around the subject of birds. Whether we take it in the direction of creative writing and flights of fancy (excuse the pun!), or taking a moment to think about and better understand the world around us.

So let’s get some writing flowing then.

(Don’t forget to bookmark and share this with others! Thank you!)

How to use the prompts:

Read through them until you strike a concept that immediately has your creative mind connecting dots together, and the kernel of a story forms at a moments notice!

Pick two of the story ideas at random, and combine them into a more complex piece of writing.

Write a full page to flesh out a prompt idea into the beginnings of a story.

There are no strict rules when it comes to the use of writing prompts – make them your own as your story comes to life!

The Prompts:

  • A storm is brewing out at sea, and you can see thousands of sea birds flying inland. They know the storm is going to be dangerous…
  • Night falls, and the wise old owl wakes for a night of hunting, his large eyes scanning the rolling field next to the forest…
  • Imagine you are a tiny sparrow, flying up into the sky until the towns below are just little specs…
  • Write a story from the perspective of a bird who is out finding some food to take back to their baby bird in the nest.
  • Snow swirling, the penguins huddle together for warmth as night falls…
  • The parrot arrived one day on her doorstep. She offered it some food, and suddenly it squawked out some words!
  • The little bird spied some bread in someone’s backyard, and it fluttered down to take a closer look. Suddenly…
  • The mighty albatross soared above the ocean. It had been out at sea for several weeks now, and was headed back to land finally…
  • The homing pigeon had a little container tied to his ankle, holding a rolled up piece of paper with a very important message on it. The door opened, and off he flew…
  • The eagle sat in its nest perched on the cliffs edge. It gazed keenly down at the valley below, something was moving there…
  • The falcon returned to his handlers gloved arm, and seized it with his talons as he landed.

Need more prompts?

Hey, psst – over here, we’ve got plenty more creative inspiration for you and any budding writers in your world. Check out the top site menu for a multitude of other free resources to use.

If you ever have suggestions on what you’d like us to make for you next, just drop us a line.

Hope you found this useful – it you did, it would be super helpful if you could quickly share it with your friends.

Yours, Matt & Hayley

bird description for creative writing

The Write Practice

by Joe Bunting | 46 comments

The window in my living room opens out to a wide field that ends in a line of trees. The birds live in the trees and in the mornings they fly out over the field.

There's something about birds.

Indigo Bunting by USFWS Headquarters

Sometimes you see a yellow one or a blue one. Mostly, though, they are shades of white and brown. I watch as two white birds chase each other, loop around, and fly out of my view.

Some people spend hours and days watching birds. I imagine it sharpens their senses. Their eyes learn to pick out flashes of movement in the overwhelming green of the canopy. Their ears learn the distinct song of each bird.

I, however, am content to watch the field from my living room window, and if a bird flies through my view, so be it.

Bunting is what you do in baseball (as I have heard all my life). It is that red, white, and blue half-circle of fabric they put up to play patriotic. It is also a family of birds.

My instinct tells me birds feel like hope and joy and a oneness with nature that I've experienced only a few times. They are also synonymous for my soul.

And once, I wrote about a bird in a story and was shocked at how much the bird, my “character,” moved me. Just now, a yellow bird flew the whole length of my window.

What do birds mean to you?

PRACTICE Birds can add a touch of detail that lights up your writing with life. Practice writing about birds. If it would help, go outside with a notebook and a pen and look for them. They're everywhere. As you describe them, think about what they communicate subconsciously. Write for fifteen minutes . Post your “bird watching” in the comments.

How to Write Like Louise Penny

Joe Bunting

Joe Bunting is an author and the leader of The Write Practice community. He is also the author of the new book Crowdsourcing Paris , a real life adventure story set in France. It was a #1 New Release on Amazon. Follow him on Instagram (@jhbunting).

Want best-seller coaching? Book Joe here.

Top 150 Short Story Ideas

46 Comments

M. Romeo LaFlamme

I adore birds. I have a feeder on my back deck just outside my dining room window. It attracts blue jays, wrens, cardinals, titmouses, chickadees, and gold finches. Watching them fly in to grab a nibble then fly away is a delight. Sometimes they take a rest on the crook that holds the feeder and spend a few moments primping and preening in the sun. There is something soothing and fulfilling about watching them. I think of their evolutionary orgin and enjoy the notion that I have dinosaurs on my back deck.

Joe Bunting

Dinosaurs on your deck? What a wild idea.

I adore birds. I have a feeder on my back deck just outside my dining room window. It attracts blue jays, wrens, cardinals, titmouses, chickadees, and gold finches. Watching them fly in to grab a nibble then fly away is a delight. Sometimes they take a rest on the crook that holds the feeder and spend a few moments primping and preening in the sun. There is something soothing and fulfilling about watching them. I think of their evolutionalry orgin and enjoy the notion that I have dinosaurs on my back deck.

Jeremy Statton

I love how birds just do their thing. All day long. Yesterday it was windy and when I left I saw three large birds, likely hawks, who were just playing in the gusts of wind. They hung in the sky with their wings open, nearly motionless, and then suddenly one would dive towards the earth, only to pull back up at the last second and loop around and join his friends again in the wind currents. All of this activity and it seemed effortless. He must have taken 3 flaps with his wings. Beautiful.

Mmm… that sounds beautiful.

Jeremy Statton

Joe! Your blog is great. I’m going to start doing the exercises and posting what I write. Sooo here’s the one from today!

It’s about 10:30am  and I’m sitting at a picnic table on Gainesville college’s campus looking for birds. I’ve had a love/hate relationship with birds for some time now. They annoy me at 7am and at the beach, but they are beautiful to watch. 

In a way, I feel as though I can identify with birds. Baby birds hatch and stay in the nest for a while getting loved on and fed by mom. Then when she feels they are ready, she pushes them out of the nest so they can learn to fly. Some birds begin flying right away while others take a little while to adjust to the wind, altitude, being without mom, etc. I feel like one of those birds that struggles to fly. I’ve taken a few nose dives at the ground and managed to not break my neck when I crash. I’m starting to feel the wind blow a little bit stronger, which makes me feel like it’s time for me to take a swan dive out of the nest again. I’m scared and I’m anxious but it’s about time I step, or rather, fall into the world. 

I go to just about every home Auburn football game. Auburn has a big bird rehabilitation center at the university and every home game they have one of the eagles, either the golden eagle or the bald eagle, fly around the field to pump up the fans and the players. That’s always my favorite part of the game. The raw beauty and power of raptors is intense. These birds soar like it’s the easiest thing on the planet. Maybe that’s why as humans we absolutely had to figure out how to fly. It gives you a sense of freedom.

The eagles that fly  at Auburn represent numerous things to me- strength, speed, beauty, freedom, and grace to name a few. It amazes me to see these huge birds flying among 86,000+ people with wingspans of six feet, three inch talons and a sharp beak that could seriously injure a person and yet they soar around, spot the dead rat their handler is flinging around and dive to catch it, all to the screaming of the thousands of fans. The fans may not realize it, but the eagles have the freedom to fly up and out of the stadium at any time. 

If the eagles fly off, they probably won’t return. Why can’t I be less like a baby bird and more like an eagle?

Susanna Loosier

It’s suzie by the way haha. Hope this wasn’t too long.

Hey Suzie! Thank you so much for practicing. You’re great.

My favorite paragraphs are the last three, especially the parts where you describe the eagle soaring over the football stadium. I would have loved to see more about what you were seeing as you sat at that picnic table bench (weren’t you cold?).

Diana trautwein

It was our last night in San Antonio and we were enjoying a delicious dinner on the patio of our hotel, right on the river in the middle of the city. It was hot. Now that’s an understatement. It was over 100 degrees at 5:30 in the evening. But we convinced the waiter to leave the door open so that the AC blew out and around us as we enjoyed the evening light by the water.

There were about a dozen mallard ducks paddling in the water just across the pathway from us, doing their duck thing. Diving and ruffling the water off their feathers, pecking at each other, occasionally waddling up onto the shore.

All of a sudden, a large gray flying creature whooshed down to the edge of the dirt, hovering over the river, dipping his head in for a drink every so often. As he rose back to a sitting position, I whispered to my husband, “I think that’s an owl. Can I possibly be right?” Owls aren’t known for being out and about before nightfall. Owls aren’t known for sitting on the ground. Owls aren’t known for hanging out with ducks.

But, sure enough, it was an owl.

And the ducks were alarmed, quickly moving away from where this bird of prey was getting his evening libation. I had my camera, but not my big lens, so I zeroed in as much as I could with the wide angle, and snapped off four shots, one of which showed him with his big, owl face looking at the camera, while his body faced squarely in the opposite direction. Owls have always fascinated me with their swivel like ability to move their heads. And, of course, their ability to grind up and regurgitate small living creatures, leaving a ‘tell’ of white debris in their wake.

But this owl was not interested in capturing dinner. I think maybe he was hot – and he needed a drink. He hung around for a good 15 minutes, flying up into a tree across the river where we could no longer see him. But lots of other people did! Over the course of those minutes, a small crowd of ‘fans’ gathered, snapping away with their cell phones. Our surprise visitor had created a small sensation along the riverwalk. And we enjoyed getting a glimpse.

(You can catch your own glimpse of this amazing creature here (You’ll need to scroll to the bottom of the post for this picture: http://drgtjustwondering.blogspot.com/2011/09/shifting-gearsmoving-towards-retreat.html )

I love this story. I remember reading about it on your blog a little while ago. Your writing style is good because I can see it, I can see the river and the ducks and the patio and the owl in the tree. I’m sure your writing voice sounds just like you telling a story over dinner.

oddznns

This is a quick bird one … while riding home on the commuter train last week.

A flash of bright Yellow Cuts the vertical of the rain

An oriole Singing To the percussion of the rain

Technical fault three minute stop Interlude on the six o’clock train

Through three degrees of separation – windowpane, wind, wheels clattering

The even song Whistling Onward the train through monsoon rain

This is good. I don’t really know if you’re talking about a bird that looks like lightning, or if the lightning allowed you to see the bird, or if the lightning reminded you of a bird. And that might be okay.

This poem works as an interesting metaphor, something beautiful in the midst of a day filled with rain and delays on the train, beauty in the middle of darkness. I like it.

Were you intentionally trying to rhyme the last line of the longer stanzas? I’m not sure if you need it. Rhyme is really hard to use in modern poetry. Most of the time it makes the poem look amateur and hokey. I don’t think your poem is hokey, but you have to be careful.

Thanx for the comment. Not trying to rhyme the longer stanza’s … just came out that way… but you’re right. They need some work. Anyway, it was just a quick one. I stick them in a draft box and re-polish them when I’m stuck with the novel.

It’s funny how these things happen. You posted a revised version on your blog right?

Chris T.

Frolicking through nature I spot a passerby A tiny red fox, cunning and sly.

Climbing the rocks a soft eagles cry he’s running away…

Power terror…

beauty…

Goodbye Mr.Fox A valiant fight But today You lose to this supreme, mighty bird of prey.

I meant to put an extra line between ” a valiant fight” and “but today,” because, well, it just sounds a little awkward at the end like that.

Jeanne

I loved this! This was an amazing poem.

debbi

I loved this exercise because the book I have coming out in November is called, “In Everything, Birds.” It contains 75 poems that some how, some way have birds in them, maybe only 6 times as the actual theme.

Sandra D

the birds crept in twilight padding on the wet grass.

I lay with my head on the concrete staring at them.

The red robins were my favorite because they always seemed to turn toward me and stare. Something about being stared at with their beedy eyes, while their chests heaved up and down. But in that time they would sometimes look for a minute or more, just staring. Sometimes it hopped closer to me.

Eventually it would turn away, pounding its beak into the clay soil and ripping out grass til its prey wiggled wildly in its beak. Then it’d jump then let out its wings and flap them as it would go up and up till it swooped into a thick tree where it disappeared.

I see other birds too sometimes. But they never look at me. Just stay for their breakfast bugs and then off to the tree to chit chat with their friends across the block.

Now there are no birds in the yard. But there is a whipering chatter, quiet but fervent, like whispers during church. Just the empty grass, and the empty plants, and empty trees. Not even the bees are up to make their entrance. The sky is a chilly blue. I don’t want to be here. I don’t want to watching for these birds who could care less about me. But here I am. Listening to their singing. They have started singing. They are so excited. They can feel the rush of dawn coming. They know the time for their eggs to hatch is coming. And soon they will have have helpless little babies clinging to their nests, which they will feed, and they will love. That is nature. Everyone loves their babies.

Their singing, like small hymnals, like children running. I want to feel excited too, I want to sing out just because I am alive and sun is coming. I am almost annoyed to be witnessing their divine faith.

Being a frail bird is accepting death can snatch you up any night, so morning is a celebration always. I poke my finger into the dirt, slowly pull a blade of grass from out the dirt. Its long root lay flat in my hand. I toss it aside, it lay lost forgotten to god as it will dry and wither away.

My plants will appreciate that though, kill a few blades of grass, make some more room for their roots to flourish.

http://writeitonmywall.wordpress.com/

Kiki Stamatiou

Beautiful piece of prose. Great descriptions and use of language. There is so much beautiful color within this piece. The flow is rather smooth. As I was reading this, I felt like I was a participant in the experience. I like the way you take your readers on a beautiful, captivating journey through the use of the spoken word. A lovely piece of writing all around.

Tapiocaqueen

“Hey Kristi, do you want to go outside now?” I say. Of course, she doesn’t reply. How could she? She has cerebral palsy and has had it ever since she was born nine years ago. Of course, she understands us, my husband Max, our youngest, Daphne, who’s seven, and I, but we can only understand her through vain attempts to ask her ‘yes blink once’ and ‘no blink twice’ questions repeatedly until we get what she wants to say. She blinks twice. (No) “Come on Kristi, the weather’s perfect!” I say. “Yeah, come ON Kristi!” asks Daphne. Kristi blinks twice, her grey eyes (she gets those from Max) dull and uninterested. “Well, I don’t care whether you want to or not, but you are going to go outside and get a breath of fresh air for once, instead of being cooped up inside all the time!” I say determined. Kristi blinks once but stares at me icily, which is her way rolling her eyes and saying “Fine.” I push her wheelchair with Daphne chattering about her day happily and carefully roll it down the steps of our porch. We walk like this until we reach the park. Usually it’s filled with happy toddlers and fussy moms, but today the new amusement park is open, and we didn’t want to make Kristi feel bad because she can’t go on any rides, so we decided to stay home. We sit on the grass for a little while in silence until Daphne pulls my arm excitedly. “Look Mommy!” she says, cheeks flushed red with delight, “It’s a canary!”

I turned my head to Daphne’s chubby finger and there it was, a canary, hopping closer and closer to us, cocking its head curiously. I look at Kristi as she sits, her eyes, shining, focused on the slowly advancing bird. “Oh Mommy, can we feed it?” Daphne asks, in a, I admit, slightly whiny tone. “Oh dang,” I mutter, careful to omit any swear words teachers might later ask in a condescending tone where Daphne could have learned it because she certainly didn’t learn it at home, right? “I forgot to bring food, I’m sorry sweetie.” “Aw man,” Daphne sighs, and I can see the disappointment on Kristi’s face. It seems the canary does too, and as its beady eyes scan Kristi’s face, it hops forward and tilts its head almost sympathetically. Then, suddenly, the canary flutters suddenly upward towards Kristi’s hand, which is resting on the arm of her chair. We all hold our breaths, and Kristi stays so still she doesn’t even blink. Then the canary starts hopping around Kristi’s wheelchair, her arms, and on her head. It then promptly flies away, but not before it delivers a mini white slimy bomb on my head, which sends Daphne rolling on the floor and Kristi cracking the smallest smile. But as I watch the canary fly away, I’m not mad, but thankful that it was kind enough to make my Kristi’s day.

*please comment on my story and how to make it better **P.S. this is not a true story (well, maybe it is for someone else)

Prompt #9: Birds Usually Gather Where Lots Of People Are Around By Kiki Stamatiou a. k. a. Joanna Maharis

Birds are generally found in a group where there are lots of people around, such as a parking lot. On many occasions when I go to one of my local Walmart stores with my aunt, and my grandmother, we see lots of birds near our or hovering nearby. Generally, they are looking for food.

We often saw many of the birds when we used to go to fast food places years ago. I remember sitting in our car in the parking lot of the fast food restaurant, and my aunt would toss out some French fries onto the ground near her car.

Several little birds swarmed around aiming to get even a piece of the French fries.

My aunt got out of our car, walked around in the parking lot, scattering the pieces of French fries to be sure many of the birds could enjoy them, instead of having them fight over the fries.

Upon leaving the parking lot of the fast food place, we stopped off at one of our local Walmarts where there were other birds nearby. We had some French fries left, so my aunt tossed them out to the birds who swarmed around them and nibbled on them.

I enjoy watching the little sparrows prance about when they’d walk. I remember remarking to my aunt how cute I thought they were. I got out of the car, and took pictures of them with my cell phone. My aunt used her Smart phone to take pictures of the birds.

Birds are such gentle little creatures. I couldn’t help but fall in love with them. I’ve always loved birds since I was a small child.

During my high school and college years, my family had a parrot my dad named Mr. Alex. We taught it to speak Greek, in addition to speaking English. I taught it some Spanish, because I was studying the language during my junior and senior years of high school. Mr. Alex was a nice form of company. He enjoyed listening to music from our stereo, while I helped my mother with the housework. In particular, he liked the music of New Kids On The Block.

We often placed his cage in our living room. He sat on top of it when we’d let him out from time to time. He watched television with us. Mr. Alex loved to watch music concerts, especially when it came to watching New Kids On The Block perform. He even learned the words to their songs and would sing along with them.

Whenever my dad would talk on the phone, Mr. Alex would imitate him. My dad talked fast in his manner of speech. Our parrot learned to do the same through imitating him.

He was such a sweet little bird, even though he’d wake up early in the mornings whenever I had a day off from work, and he’d kick his cage. In doing so, he woke me up with all the noise he was making. I told him if he didn’t stop kicking the cage and start behaving himself, I’d take away his music privileges. All and all, I’ll always remember the special times we had together.

When my parents sold our house and moved down to Florida, my brother sold Mr. Alex to a pet shop to make sure he’d get a good home. I couldn’t take the bird with me, because I was staying at the college dormitories when attending college. Pets weren’t allowed other than fish. My brother and other relatives weren’t able to take him either, because they were working, and didn’t want to be woken up at night by him.

© Copyright, Kiki Stamatiou, 2015

kwjordy

He looks down on us in the garden. Surely we are not the target. But something has caught his attention and he has swooped in to check out the ground to see if there is something down here he wants. It is usually a zarigueya, or opossum, or sometimes a dead rat. It might even be an iguana, but I think I would have seen a dead iguana, even in the neighbor’s yard. And the aroma of a rotting iguana is not one you can miss. Still, if a turkey vulture is in your tree, you can bet there is something dead on the ground.

This particular bird sits very still, barely moving but for his head, slowly perusing, searching. His great gray talons spread wide and grasp the branch; you clearly would not want those talons grasping for you. In fact, the mere presence of a turkey vulture, while visually awesome, makes you check your position, making certain there is a close retreat should the need arise.

His steely body curves upward to a large, proud chest and continues to the thick neck and head that is, frankly, a bit too small. The coal-black feathers gather neatly against his back; when he is in flight you wonder how he folds those long wings into such a compact space.

Sitting in the tree above my garden, he casts a pallor that makes even the flamboyanes lose some of their fiery red color. There is not a cat to be seen, and I feel I should retreat, as well. But I cannot; I am drawn to the bird’s god-like magnificence. I don’t know if any civilization has used the turkey vulture as a great spiritual symbol, but it would be entirely appropriate to elevate the bird to one of respect and reverence.

I attempt to snap a photo or two, but the photos are inevitably unsatisfying. Turkey Vultures land with their backs to the sun so as not to allow the bright rays to interfere with their sight, so photos are backlit and the subject is dark. Clever. I have many photos of turkey vultures, but all of them unsatisfying.

But then, I’m not certain turkey vultures were put on Earth for my gratification.

grantburkhardt

I don’t see any birds, but from my chair in front of the open window I hear three of them. The first one is conversing with pauses between words. Wae, wae, wae, waewae, wae. It’s the one farthest away. I have to push my ear through the house to hear it. The fresh, cool air is propelling his sound into my home. I’m sure I’ve heard this bird or its kin before.

The second one is in this tree somewhere. The tree is I think some kind of oak and is healthy and changing. Its blooms hug it near its base more firmly than at the top. It’s the biggest thing in a yard full of bushes and shrubs. The bird, hidden in this sea of green leaves somewhere, is chirping a standard song where each note extends for minutes unless you lean in to really hear the parts where she changes her tune as she inhales and exhales. heehooheehooheehooheehooheehooheehooheehooheehooheehoo.

Somewhere in the middle there is a third crying out, making a noise that sounds like the radiation that comes from the sun in a desert. It wails for ten or twelve seconds at a time before it stops. If it were a visible wave it would be a bell – starting soft, getting loudest in the middle, falling back into silence. aaaeeeeehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhheeeeeaaa. It reminds me only of heat. It’s the sound I’d expect to hear if I pressed my face to the pavement of a highway in the summer. It is a new cup of coffee, set aside for a moment or two. It’s the pool of grease on the center of the pizza slice and the dark backseat of a parked car after a wedding. Every few minutes a few of those steaming sounds overlap, like there’s a second or third one making the same hot sound, but I know it’s a single bird. He doesn’t always stop to do other things before starting again.

Nadia

The dove cooed softly to the other doves, eating the many different seeds I had put in the bird feeder this morning. I watched as they gathered around the food, almost in a civilized manner, taking turns eating the stale seeds. The fluttered their white feathers, hopping around and looking every now and then for any signs of danger. I held very still, watching them from the window. Suddenly, a noisy cardinal came swooping down towards the bird feeder, spooking the doves a bit. The cardinal, and a few others of its kind, started colonizing the food. The doves quickly moved away, letting the scary red birds eat. These birds, I noticed, were a lot different from the doves. They pecked at each other, eager to eat their food. A lot of times, they would quickly snap their heads around, looking for every other bird that wanted their food. I thought the doves were much better.

Lele Lele

Stretching her arms, she yawned. A bird dropped by her right on the benched. She shoo’ed it away.

“What a fine morning,” she said.

Her eyes dropped and her head started falling down. A bird perched on her head and she jerked right up.

“Shoo.” Her hand waved it away. It titled it’s tiny little head at her. “Shoo, you stupid bird, shoo.”

She yawned again. The bird flew away.

The fresh wind blew again and she found her eyes started closing again. She rested her head on the soft cradle of the bench. The birds were chirping. She breathed slowly and deep.

One deep inhale. One deep exhale. One deep inhale. Hold. One deep exhale. Hold.

A bird fluttered by her hands. She continued breathing. The bird danced towards her shoulders. Exhale.

She heard more flutters of wings. Inhale. Louder chirps. The bird on her hand stopped moving. It scratched softly on her skin. A small smile appeared on her mouth.

Then it pecked at her.

Her eyes shot wide opened. She glared at the bird. Then her eyes raised up as she saw the school of birds surrounding her. They were bobbing their tiny little heads and chirping.

She waved her hands around them. They didn’t move.

“Hell?” she said.

The little bird on her arms scratched her again. A sigh escaped her lips.

“That’s nice,” she said.

The birds started flying away. All that’s left was the bird perched on her hands and about 4 or 5 slowly closing in on her.

She shoved her hands inside her pockets. She found dry stale crackers. She grinned at the birds.

“Okay you dumb birds,” she said as she cracked the crackers in tiny little pieces. She threw the food on the ground. “Here you go!”

The birds didn’t move.

They went closer and she started to look like like kind of feathered weido. She scratched her head.

A cup of steaming coffee appeared before her face.

“Didn’t know you were into Disney stuff,” he said.

She took it and took a sip. “You’re late Jon.”

“Good morning to you too,” he said.

She blinked. She looked around. The birds were already gone.

She frowned. “This coffee stinks.”

Will

Seagulls surround my house. That’s logical, given that I live by the seaside. Yet the profusion of these pseudo-pigeons of the port is more that I could have expected when I moved here.

Driving around the corner, I glimpse a whole flock of seagulls resting on a huge garbage container. I can barely see what’s underneath, for it’s swamped in white and grey feathers. For all the shrieking and flapping those birds make, they are remarkably cool when I drive by. A few of them give me the eye. They’re not afraid of humans; nobody comes to slaughter them; they feed on the overflowing rubbish bins and the discarded remains of fast-food meals. The trail of faeces they leave behind is rivalled only by pigeons’. They are the classic residents of the city, as timeless as the craggy cliffs and the waves.

It’s not unusual for a gull to sit on window sills, engaging in staring contests with humans and their pets. The braver ones fly through open windows, daring to question what lies inside; they get chased out by frightened housewives and immensely loyal cats.

A handful of other species make themselves comfortable in the gulls’ wake. Tiny brown and grey ones picking at invisible crumbs; the occasional blackbird; the ever-present pigeon, who feasts on everything; sparrows which love to hop around instead of fly.

bah

it twaddled on its flimsy feet, looking for its next location as it sat upon the twig of an olive tree. its tail looped around its body and began chirping in a burst of excitement. the evening sun was blocked by a single ball of cloud, there was a gentle breeze which carried with it dry autumn leaves. the bird had already disappeared and it felt empty,

Noname

Birds of a feather flock together.

Thats the idiom that comes to mind as I watched the pidgeons gathered on the ground looking for seeds in the grass.

Those wild birds. They risk danger and captivity by coming near humans and for what? For the sake of food.

I cant decide whether thats brave or just stupid.

I smile to myself, remembering a song about about poisoning the pidgeons in the park. I found its dark humor hilarious and it was a well written song.

Pidgeons are so weird, I thought as I watched them take flight when I came a little too close to them. How do they sync their movements so well together. Do they take choreograhy lessons?

I laugh at the idea of birds taking dance lessons from humans. Most likely it was the other way around and humans learned a thing or two about dancing from the pidgeons instead. With their little swaggering bodies, they always looked ready to throw it down and have a dance fight.

Vicki Baldwin

Birds have a life of their own. They do not act the same way that people act. The birds rest in the green trees and chirp with each other. As they fly they slap their wings and dive down to the ground below then. Once on the ground they search for bugs, worms and just grass to eat. They search for sticks and once located they grab it and fly into the tree where they have staredt building a nest. Their home will have eggs and soon the eggs will crack and little baby birds craw out of the egg shell and grow up to fly away like their parents to repeat the lives of their parents.

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14 Best Bird Prompts to Elevate Your Creative Vision

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Are you looking for some inspiration to elevate your creative vision? Look no further than these 14 bird prompts! Whether you’re an artist, writer, or just looking for some fun prompts for your AI image generator, these prompts are sure to spark your imagination.

From majestic eagles to colorful parrots, birds have long been a source of inspiration for artists and writers alike. With their unique shapes, colors, and behaviors, birds offer endless possibilities for creative expression.

So why not challenge yourself to create something new and exciting with these bird prompts? Whether you’re a seasoned pro or just starting out, these prompts are sure to help you take your creativity to the next level. So grab your pen, paintbrush, or AI image generator and let’s get started!

Prompts examples:

Here is the list of stunning logo prompts to boost your creative skill to next level.

I bid you farewell, Winter

As the snow melts away and the flowers bloom, A bird sings a joyful tune. It welcomes the new season’s birth, With a happy melody. It spreads its joy across the earth, And fills the air with glee. It bids farewell to winter’s chill, It welcomes spring with a happy trill.

Negative prompt

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two heads, two face, out of frame, extra fingers, mutated hands, poorly drawn hands, poorly drawn face, mutation, deformed, ugly, blurry, bad anatomy, bad proportions, extra limbs, cloned face, disfigured, out of frame, ugly, extra limbs, bad anatomy, gross proportions, malformed limbs, missing arms, missing legs, extra arms, extra legs, mutated hands, fused fingers, too many fingers, long neck, poorly drawn eyes, double heads, double faces, two heads, two faces, text, logo, wordmark, writing, heading, signature

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bird description for creative writing

strybk, strybk, Fantasy Sylphine bird, hoarfrost plumage,

dreamlike, glitters, symmetrical, hyperdetailed, concept art, digital painting, fantasy, flowers, epic, intricate details, sharp focus, trending on artstation, kids story book style, muted colors, watercolor style, sf, intricate artwork masterpiece, ominous, matte painting movie poster, golden ratio, trending on cgsociety, intricate,

epic, trending on artstation, by artgerm, h. r. giger and beksinski, highly detailed, vibrant, production cinematic character render, ultra high quality model, kids story book style, muted colors, watercolor style, kids story book style, muted colors, watercolor style

2 heads, elongated body, 2 faces, cropped image, out of frame, draft, deformed hands, signature, watermark, twisted fingers, double image, long neck, extra limb, ugly, poorly drawn hands, missing limb, ugly, over saturated, grain, blurry, bad anatomy, disfigured, poorly drawn face, text, logo, wordmark, writing, heading, signature

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octane render, hyperdetailed, magic, fantasy, fairy. Josephine Wall, Adrian Chesterman, artstation,

4k, symmetrical, soft lighting, trending on artstation, intricate details, highly detailed, pencil drawing, sketching, unreal engine

, kids story book style, muted colors, watercolor style

Dripping paint, 2 heads, 2 faces, cropped image, out of frame, deformed hands, twisted fingers, double image, malformed hands, multiple heads, extra limb, ugly, poorly drawn hands, missing limb, disfigured, cut off, ugly, grain, low res, deformed, blurry, bad anatomy, disfigured, poorly drawn face, floating limbs, disconnected limbs, disgusting, poorly drawn, mangled, extra fingers, duplicate artifacts, missing arms, mutated hands, mutilated hands, cloned face, malformed, text, logo, wordmark, writing, heading, signature

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bird description for creative writing

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strybk, Fantasy Sylphine bird, hoarfrost plumage,

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In conclusion, birds have always been a fascinating subject for artists, writers, and photographers alike. With these 14 bird prompts, you can elevate your creative vision and explore the beauty and diversity of these winged creatures. Whether you choose to focus on their physical features, behaviors, or symbolism, there is no shortage of inspiration to be found in the world of birds. So spread your wings and let your imagination soar with these prompts!

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How to Write an Essay on Birds: 9 Interesting Areas to Focus

How to Write an Essay on Birds

How to write an essay on birds? There are some interesting facts you can write about. Information about birds can be an excellent source for a creative essay. Birds are found in every part of the globe, creating a large variety of species to write about, especially when well-researched. Interesting bird facts can create wonderful topics for an essay, including unique theses that a student can explore and develop an enjoyable piece of writing.

When writing an essay about birds, it’s important to consider researching these facts, especially their biological composition. For instance, one can write an essay about birds by highlighting some distinguishing characteristics between bird species. This type of writing would be most interesting in English, particularly due to the distinctive nature of scientific descriptions. You can also include a short note about their biological differences in each section to make the essay more appealing.

Interesting Facts for Writing an Essay on Birds

Feather distinction.

One of the most interesting topics for an essay on birds is their feather diversity. Birds have distinctive appearances in structure, order, and color. Feather distinction is one of the distinguishing characteristics between species. However, some species have different colors based on various biological and environmental factors. For instance, some bird species have distinctive differences between the feathers of a male and a female. In other cases, the differences may appear disorderly but are worth investigating.

Migration marvels and global distribution

Some bird species are migratory, traveling between regions, even continents. Since the migrations coincide with seasons, they create some migration marvels worth writing about. For instance, seagulls migrate between winter and summer, running from the cold weather. During their travels, the birds create awesome displays of their traveling routines, mating habits, and hunting traditions. This topic is most suitable for nature lovers, people willing to investigate many species for their beauty and scientific facts.

Nesting prowess

You can also write an essay on birds based on their architectural techniques. Birds build their nests differently depending on their size, primary predators, and location. While the weaverbird prefers loosely hanging tree branches, the penguin can only nest on the ground near mountains and ocean shores. The structure and composition of the nest also differ significantly, creating an array of architectural designs to compare. Any person interested in birds understands the importance of a nest, especially during mating and incubation.

bird description for creative writing

Egg laying facts

Birds are oviparous or egg-laying animals in English. Different species lay different egg sizes, colors, and shapes. They have distinctive characteristics based on their egg-laying habits, including location and responsibility. Some birds, such as the Cuckoo , exhibit parasitic behaviors in brooding. They lay their eggs in other birds’ nests, forcing the foster parents to incubate a foreign egg and feed an adopted chick afterward. Egg-laying habits can be quite an impressive topic for an essay on birds, especially due to the amount of scientific evidence available online.

Sociocultural rituals

Another interesting concept you can write about birds is their social lives. Like humans and any other living thing, birds socialize on different occasions. Some live in large groups, while others are loaners. However, all birds have distinctive mating rituals. Some specials engage in colorful, elaborate courtship traditions. They display marvelous moves to attract mates, using their wings and, in some cases, their avian architectural prowess to assert dominance. Birds engage in long relationships that resemble marriage in humans. The bald eagle is a good example of a bird species that marries or mates for life. The differences in sociocultural behaviors can create an amazing topic for a good essay.

Cognitive capacity

Some bird species are worth writing essays about, especially those that have shown high intelligence. Students can investigate intellectual abilities in birds to find impressive topics for their term papers and final research. You can even hire an experienced academic writer to help with the information gathering and drafting. For instance, CustomWritings professional essay writing service is a prominent helper with over ten years of experience supporting students’ journeys. While intelligent avian is attractive, finding accurate and reliable supporting evidence on such a topic can be daunting. With professional assistance, you can access scholarly articles and integrate findings from research in your essay on birds.

Vocal abilities

Birds are also known for their vocalization capabilities. While students cannot transcribe bird songs into writing, investigations into singing abilities can constitute a good essay. Most importantly, one can research birds’ ability to vocalize or mimic different sounds. Some bird species are known for their vocalization, especially when imitating humans and other birds. Others can produce relatively unique sounds, making them an attractive piece of marvel for analysis.

Scholars and researchers tend to focus on the biological differences between birds. Notably, biologists have invested significantly in understanding the genetic differences for classification and knowledge gathering. With this information, students can develop exciting topics for their essays or end-term research papers. Another interesting point of focus is the survival instincts and abilities of birds. While some species rely on camouflage for safety, others are birds of prey. The details about each bird’s genetics can help explain distribution and preferences.

Life expectancy

Similarly, the biological differences explain the differences in life expectancy. It’s difficult to ascertain the length of life in wild birds due to constant migration. However, scientific evidence suggests that some birds live longer than others. A good essay writer would consider analyzing the reasoning behind these differences and identify genetic and environmental characteristics affecting the length of life.

How Do I Write an Essay on Birds?

The best approach for writing an essay on birds involves conducting sufficient research. A good student would start by identifying an interesting fact to write about birds and research it. The information gathered from the knowledge search can then be used to create a comprehensive essay topic with a compelling thesis. The interesting facts about birds can also be a good hook for the introduction. The essay on birds should be organized professionally, adopting a basic paper structure with an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Writing an essay on birds should also incorporate scientific and scholarly evidence. A good writer understands the need to integrate external sources with supporting and counterarguments. This approach will make your essay more interesting to read and easy to grade. Your professor may be impressed by your capacity to research a wild topic and investigate evidence found in scholarly works. Besides, supporting your arguments with reliable and verifiable arguments makes your writing believable. You can also impress the reader with ideas corroborating your knowledge of birds. For instance, you can integrate information about mating in an essay about birds’ vocal abilities to demonstrate a connection between the two issues. In the end, your essay about birds should be compelling and informative.

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Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

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Anne Lamott

Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life Paperback – Picture Book, September 1, 1995

  • Print length 256 pages
  • Language English
  • Publisher Vintage
  • Publication date September 1, 1995
  • Dimensions 7.99 x 5.2 x 0.54 inches
  • ISBN-10 0385480016
  • ISBN-13 978-0385480017
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"A gift to all of us mortals who write or ever wanted to write... sidesplittingly funny, patiently wise and alternately cranky and kind -- a reveille to get off our duffs and start writing now , while we still can." -- Seattle Times .

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  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Vintage; 1st Paperback Edition (September 1, 1995)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 256 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0385480016
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0385480017
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 9.5 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 7.99 x 5.2 x 0.54 inches
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About the author

Anne lamott.

Anne Lamott is the New York Times bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow; Small Victories; Stitches; Some Assembly Required; Grace (Eventually); Plan B; Traveling Mercies; Bird by Bird; Operating Instructions, and the forthcoming Hallelujah Anyway. She is also the author of several novels, including Imperfect Birds and Rosie. A past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and an inductee to the California Hall of Fame, she lives in Northern California.

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Imagine a New Bird Creative Writing or Big Writing Lesson VCOP + Audience Purpose Genre

Imagine a New Bird Creative Writing or Big Writing Lesson VCOP + Audience Purpose Genre

Subject: Creative writing

Age range: 7-11

Resource type: Lesson (complete)

The Future Teacher Foundation

Last updated

7 March 2017

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19,898 quotes, descriptions and writing prompts, 4,964 themes

birdsong - quotes and descriptions to inspire creative writing

  • beauty of nature quotes
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At the dawntide the manor roof was alive with the compendium of the birds, for in their song was their rich emotional intelligence told to anyone capable of real listening.
The kitchen table cools my palms as the warm brown hues rekindle my soul on this and every day. It is the steady companion to the aroma of freshly baked bread and the birdsong that flutters in from the garden beyond.
The birdsong was the river of the air, a flowing music that hydrated our parched souls.
Into the gentle airwaves they gave their song, those tiny friends of feather that adorned the sky.
Birdsong comes sweet and high, the soprano to the other sounds of the daytime. I feel them as auditory smiles and expressions of joy, those communications of the birds.
Through my bedroom window comes the brightness of the dayshine, that boldness that lifts my spirits. The chorus of the birds drifts in as steady ocean waves, only their melody is dancing. In a moment the tune can fly so high and resettle, an auditory version of how they play upon wing. I move toward it, feeling the light reach my skin and my eyes adjust to its brilliance. I let reach out with my hand and lean on the white gloss frame, notice the subtle pattern on the glass of raindrops that came and dried.
Here comes the birdsong, the laughter of our winged friends. I listen to the melody - rising, swooping, resting, just as birds do. Every movement that is so natural to them is reflected in their tune, the way they turn their heads with gentle precision, hop upon branches and dive into the garden air. It is their orchestra and opera, a salutation from above as we naked bipeds walk below.
The birdsong comes as jazz, softly floating and free; notes never written dancing as steps never taught. Each sound-bouquet came as a sculpture, one that can only come from soul born to an infinite horizon, never tainted by the cruelty of a cage. Perhaps that's why Ella loved it so, for she knew joy when they sang it, she knew joy was possible in the world.
Birds trill, sweetly high, the chorus as playful as the birds themselves. With closed eyes, I imagine their music to be colours, painting stairs in the same way grapevines grow - this way and that, in a beautiful chaos that isn't quite random. In the calm of the day, my heartbeat is the steady drum to their melody and I seep into the moment, allowing myself to climb those rainbow stairs.
Through the percussion of the rain comes the birdsong, each a music to the other, together an opera only nature gives. The sweet melody is the heart of the bird, freely given. As our work is our love made visible, so this song is theirs, flowing into the air. There is something about it that brings deeper breath into my lungs, brings my own heart to a steady rhythm. In that moment I am so thankful with everything that I am for a sky full of birds and chance to be alive.
The birdsong drifts as well as any summertime pollen. It comes as magical as any flute, as improvised as deep south jazz, and as soulful as love's kiss. In that moment I am present, feet still and heart open.

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IMAGES

  1. Bird Descriptive Writing Activity (Teacher-Made)

    bird description for creative writing

  2. Birds Writing Activities ~ 59 total pages

    bird description for creative writing

  3. Birds Writing and Drawing Prompts: Year-Round Bird Study for Kids

    bird description for creative writing

  4. All About Birds Informative Writing

    bird description for creative writing

  5. Bird Writing Prompts: 10 Creative Writing Ideas for English Learners

    bird description for creative writing

  6. Bird Writing Paper Printable Letter Paper Lined Stationery

    bird description for creative writing

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Describe Birds in Writing (17 Best Tips & Examples)

    Here is how to describe birds in writing: Describe birds in writing by focusing on their feathers, songs, movements, and behaviors. Use vivid words like "iridescent" or phrases like "wings slicing the air". Employ sensory descriptions, symbolic meanings, and cultural contexts to bring avian characters to life in your narratives.

  2. Bird

    bird. - quotes and descriptions to inspire creative writing. A little bird, in a bold cap of golden feathers, alights upon the blossomed twig. By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, January 12, 2021 . It is as if each beat of the bird's wings forms part of a sonnet to the air. By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, January 12, 2021 .

  3. 25 Creative Writing Prompts About Birds » JournalBuddies.com

    Whether you're writing poems, notebook entries, or short stories about birds, these prompts will help you considerably. Take a look now and enjoy! 25 Creative Writing Prompts About Birds. Write an exchange between a talking parrot and a pirate captain. A family of birds is migrating when a strong gust of wind knocks the baby bird out of the sky.

  4. How to DESCRIBE Birds in Writing (Try These EASY Methods)

    How to DESCRIBE Birds in Writing (Try These EASY Methods) | Watch this playlist: 🔗 Playlist: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLddZr4RRzNT5WJUTRs_vscxc6W5g...

  5. Birds in the sky

    By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, April 20, 2019 . White heaven-bound birds were as brilliant rays from wind-dappled sea-water; their brightness amid otherwise infinite blue, gliding as free souls. In each wing-given arc they were the tips of a conductor's wand, a music for both eyes and soul, bringing a wave of sweet earthly joy.

  6. Seagulls

    seagulls. - quotes and descriptions to inspire creative writing. Search entire site for seagulls. The seagull comes with a flash of silver, the sparkle of my childhood dreams. How I loved those birds that swooped and created the melody of the shore along with the lace-topped waves. By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, December 1, 2020 .

  7. 11 Writing Prompts about Birds

    The Prompts: A storm is brewing out at sea, and you can see thousands of sea birds flying inland. They know the storm is going to be dangerous…. Night falls, and the wise old owl wakes for a night of hunting, his large eyes scanning the rolling field next to the forest…. Imagine you are a tiny sparrow, flying up into the sky until the towns ...

  8. Birds

    PRACTICE. Birds can add a touch of detail that lights up your writing with life. Practice writing about birds. If it would help, go outside with a notebook and a pen and look for them. They're everywhere. As you describe them, think about what they communicate subconsciously. Write for fifteen minutes. Post your "bird watching" in the comments.

  9. Exploring Nature Writing: Examples and Tips for Writing About the Wild

    Nature writing has grown in popularity as a genre in recent years, but writing about nature in general can also be a great creative exercise, as it encourages you to observe details and put those observations into words. You can use these tips to practice nature writing: 1. Always keep a notebook handy. The first thing you want to do is ensure ...

  10. 14 Best Bird Prompts to Elevate Your Creative Vision

    Elevate your creative vision with these 14 bird prompts! From majestic eagles to colorful parrots, these writing prompts will inspire your imagination. Perfect for writers, artists, and bird enthusiasts alike. ... should not be included in the image., text, logo, wordmark, writing, heading, signature. Parameters. Model: Stable Diffusion 1.5 ...

  11. How to Write an Essay on Birds: 9 Interesting Areas to Focus

    Interesting Facts for Writing an Essay on Birds. Feather distinction. One of the most interesting topics for an essay on birds is their feather diversity. Birds have distinctive appearances in structure, order, and color. Feather distinction is one of the distinguishing characteristics between species. However, some species have different ...

  12. Bird Descriptive Writing Activity (teacher made)

    Get imaginative in your creative writing lessons with our Bird Descriptive Writing activity!Inside this resource, you'll discover 12 unique worksheets (each complete with 4 differentiating birds) that provide pictures of birds. Using their skills and knowledge of descriptive writing so far, kids will need to complete the template which asks for a description of each bird. This includes ...

  13. What Birdsong Can Teach Us About Creativity

    It's a structured form of expression, similar to writing a poem or, more directly, composing a song. For many birds, singing means following a script, the successful reading of which results in ...

  14. Small bird

    It is the winter without snow and under the warm summer sun in August. The small bird is the decoration, the brilliant red of the scene and the blessed earthy browns too. By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, September 5, 2019 . A small bird hops up the brickwork as easily as jumping over grass. In a short while it will take a short flight ...

  15. Bird Descriptive Writing Activity Sheets

    Put your class's creative writing skills to the test with the Bird Descriptive Writing Activity Sheets. Students will be tasked with describing each birds' size, colour, sounds and chosen diet. The Bird Descriptive Writing Activity Sheets are great for refining your students' writing skills and making them more aware of the wonderful animals we co-exist with. This resource is also ...

  16. Writing Resources: Bird by Bird

    The full title of this book is Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life. It's part writing advice, part memoir. However, the memoir material is different than what you find in Stephen King's On Writing, which focuses on his life as a writer, whereas Lamott delves into her personal life, sometimes sharing stories that relate to ...

  17. Bird by Bird: Unlocking Creative Potential One Step at a Time

    Chapter 1 What's bird by bird. "Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life" is a non-fiction book written by Anne Lamott. It was first published in 1994. The book is a guide for ...

  18. Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

    Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life. Paperback - Picture Book, September 1, 1995. NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • An essential volume for generations of writers young and old. The twenty-fifth anniversary edition of this modern classic will continue to spark creative minds for years to come.

  19. Bird Descriptive Writing Activity (Teacher-Made)

    Get imaginative in your creative writing lessons with our Bird Descriptive Writing activity!Inside this resource, you'll discover 12 unique worksheets (each complete with 4 differentiating birds) that provide pictures of birds. Using their skills and knowledge of descriptive writing so far, kids will need to complete the template which asks for a description of each bird. This includes ...

  20. Imagine a New Bird Creative Writing or Big Writing Lesson VCOP

    KS2 Creative Writing Resources for Ages 6 - 13. If you are looking for creative writing resources and prompts then look no further as these wonderful lessons have been designed to inspire the most reluctant of writers! This huge bundle contains all of the creative writing topics created by **bestselling TES authors, The Future Teacher Foundation.**

  21. Birdsong

    Descriptionari has thousands of original creative story ideas from new authors and amazing quotes to boost your creativity. Kick writer's block to the curb and write that story! Descriptionari is a place where students, educators and professional writers discover and share inspirational writing and amazing descriptions

  22. Creative Writing Copywriter

    Read the job description for Creative Writing Copywriter - Remote in Minnetonka, MN, US

  23. Creative Writing

    PUTNEY 2024 Dates: 19-23rd Aug, 28th Oct -1st Nov. Times: 10am-2pm. Venue: Hurlingham School, 122 Putney Bridge Rd, London SW15 2NQ. Includes: Supervised outdoor time, snacks and drinks; please bring packed lunch. Suitable for: Children in Years 1-6 (Year 1 students can join after the Christmas holidays), suitable for writers of all abilities.