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MSc / MPhil in Environmental Change and Management

Course details.

  • Based in Oxford
  • Start date 01 October 2024

See the Graduate Admissions website to apply and for more information.

[email protected]

Course structure

Graduate destinations, equality, diversity and inclusion, how to apply, teaching team.

Our MSc / MPhil in Environmental Change and Management (ECM) seeks to create interdisciplinary leaders who are confident and practical decision-makers with an analytical approach to environmental issues.

The full time 12-month taught course provides a broad appreciation of the major processes of environmental change, and of the people and institutions involved in environmental management. 

The ECM comprises:

  • Eight core modules
  • Two electives
  • A 15,000 word dissertation

Our approach combines directed teaching, self-regulated learning, discussion, and formal assessment.

The course overarching aims are to:

  • Examine the nature, causes and impacts of major types of environmental change. How do these changes operate and interact on global, regional and local scales? How do they relate to critical social and ecological systems?
  • Explore the economic, legal, cultural, and ethical underpinnings of environmental responsibility and systemic solutions, including mitigation, adaptation, remediation, enhanced resource stewardship, and other sustainable responses to environmental change at different scales and within different organisational contexts
  • Empower environmental leaders to address the world’s most pressing environmental problems through an understanding of and training in the key analytical and practical skills, and in a broad appreciation of earth systems and societies in relation to environmental change.

The objectives are assessed through three themes: 

  • Understanding environmental change
  • Responding to environmental change
  • Methods and techniques for environmental management

And delivered through eight modules: 

  • Welcome to the Anthropocene
  • The Earth system and its fundamental processes
  • Global change and the biosphere
  • Human systems and environmental change
  • Environmental economics and policy
  • Energy systems and climate mitigation
  • Sustainable responses to environmental change
  • Governing the Anthropocene.

Teaching takes place through lectures, seminars, workshops and field courses which provide in-depth exploration of key issues. The elective modules offer a tutorial-style teaching and discussion environment within smaller groups, based on research themes that reflect the specific interests of core faculty, research staff, and visiting scholars. The aim is to foster knowledge, critical thinking, discussion and debate, and to identify and explore theory, methods and practice in a space that encourages collaboration and critical dialogue. 

You will have approximately ten hours of core module and elective teaching per week during term time, with additional supported learning on occasional field trips. You will also be expected to undertake self-directed learning to further your knowledge of the material introduced during class. 

During the first two terms, you will develop ideas for your dissertation and undertake the majority of the work in the final term and over the summer months. Your thesis project will be supported by a specialist supervisor. 

Fieldwork and external visits are an important part of the teaching programme and currently include coastal and marine environmental change sites, local woodlands, Lake District National Park, the Centre for Alternative Technology (renewable energy and sustainability technologies) and a visit to the European Parliament. Please note that all field trips are subject to change.

  • The core modules are assessed by written examination and a piece of submitted coursework.
  • Two electives, each assessed through a 4,000-word essay
  • A 15,000 word dissertation, often undertaken in conjunction with businesses, environmental organisations, and governments 

An independent and original dissertation is an integral component of the course. We offer a suite of training activities to enable you to execute high quality independent and original research, and introduce you to applied research methods used widely in academic and professional research.

ECM alumni pursue careers with a wide range of organisations. Examples include government departments (Japan's Ministry of the Environment, Ontario Ministry of Finance), non-governmental organisations (the Carbon Trust, World Wildlife Fund), business organisations (McKinsey and Company, Ericsson Enterprise) and international agencies (World Food Programme, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). Some students use the course as a starting point for pursuing PhD (DPhil) research.

The ECM alumni network has over 700 alumni in 70 countries. The department's Alumni Office helps people to keep in touch and organises alumni events.

The University of Oxford, School of Geography and the Environment, and Environmental Change Institute are committed to fostering an inclusive culture which promotes equality, values diversity and maintains a working, learning and social environment in which the rights and dignity of all its staff and students are respected.

You can find out more about the University of Oxford’s stance and policies on equality, diversity and inclusion on the  University’s website .

Oxford 1+1 MBA

The ECM can be combined with an MBA as part of the  Oxford 1+1 MBA programme .

The two-year 1+1 graduate programme combines the depth of a specialised, one-year master’s degree with the breadth of a top-ranking, one-year  MBA .

Applications should be made through the Graduate Admissions website

Slapton Ley, in Devon – a freshwater ley which runs along the coast

MSc FAQ: A student’s perspective

Aissa Dearing (they/she) from Durham, North Carolina, USA is a current ECM student at Oriel College. Here she answers to the most pressing questions she had when she was first considering the programme, such as: Is the course difficult? How is the course structured? And, crucially, what is the social scene in Oxford like?

oxford geography dissertation

External teaching team

oxford geography dissertation

Flowers with a butterfly

MSc in Biodiversity, Conservation and Management

  • Entry requirements
  • Funding and costs

College preference

  • How to apply

About the course

The MSc in Biodiversity, Conservation and Management aims to provide a critical and conceptually sophisticated understanding of biodiversity science and the socio-economic, political, cultural and institutional contexts within which management and policy decisions are made. 

The course content is rooted in our established strengths in conservation biogeography, governance and planning, in global change and in research design. The course design also responds to the rise of market-based conservation including engagements with enterprise and the transformative potential of new technologies.

The specific course objectives are to develop your abilities to:

  • critically engage with concepts and theory in biodiversity science and management from interdisciplinary perspectives;
  • describe by whom and by what space and territory is designated and governed for conservation over time;
  • critically assess the modes through which conservation builds and extends power and describe in detail the factors that explain the emergence and performance of different types of governance
  • appreciate the role of ethics, values and societal norms in producing culturally attuned and effective conservation interventions;
  • evaluate the implications of emergent technologies for the future of biodiversity science and management; and
  • link hypothesis, theory, methods, data and field work to identify and develop advanced research questions and design.

The objectives are assessed through three themes; Biodiversity science, Conservation ethics and values, and Biodiversity policy and management, delivered through eight core modules: conservation landscapes, conservation biogeography, conservation governance, species responses to climate change, conservation and society, economics of the environment, global change and the biosphere and biodiversity technologies. Teaching for the core modules takes place through lectures, seminars, workshops, field trips and study days. There is also a skills-based module to develop research and professional skills.

Alongside the core modules in the first two terms, you will choose two elective modules. The elective modules offer a tutorial-style teaching environment with smaller groups, based on a suite of contemporary research themes that reflect the specific interests of core faculty and visiting research associates. The teaching aim is to foster discussion and debate between academic staff and students. In the final term of the course, you will undertake an independent and original research project.

Supervision

The course has an Academic Director and a Course Director who look after the day-to-day running of the course and who provide academic welfare support. During the first two terms, the MSc Course Director acts as study supervisor for students. In the third term, during which students commence their dissertation research, supervisors will usually be found within the School of Geography and the Environment.

For this course, the allocation of graduate supervision is the responsibility of the School of Geography and the Environment and it is not always possible to accommodate the preferences of incoming graduate students to work with a particular member of staff. Under exceptional circumstances a supervisor may be found outside the School of Geography and the Environment. During the dissertation project, students typically receive 8 hours of supervision.

The core modules are assessed by written examination, the two electives are each assessed through an essay and your research project will be written up as a dissertation for assessment at the end of the final term.

Graduate destinations

The aim of the course is to train future leaders in biodiversity, conservation and natural resource management. Thus the course teaches conservation as a dynamic discipline integral to all the major areas of human concern - social and environmental governance, political economy, spatial planning, agriculture, population growth, livelihoods, human and institutional capacity, investment and markets, in addition to the hard science of biodiversity.

Past graduates have gone on to obtain positions in a range of leading conservation and academic organisations and enterprises. Examples include policy positions in government departments, such as the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), management positions in global conservation NGOs, such as Conservation International and WWF, technical positions in sustainability consultancies, and expert roles in international bodies such as IUCN. A significant number of students also use the course as a gateway to start DPhil (PhD) research.

The department's Alumni Office helps alumni keep in touch with each other and organises alumni events.

Changes to this course and your supervision

The University will seek to deliver this course in accordance with the description set out in this course page. However, there may be situations in which it is desirable or necessary for the University to make changes in course provision, either before or after registration. The safety of students, staff and visitors is paramount and major changes to delivery or services may have to be made in circumstances of a pandemic, epidemic or local health emergency. In addition, in certain circumstances, for example due to visa difficulties or because the health needs of students cannot be met, it may be necessary to make adjustments to course requirements for international study.

Where possible your academic supervisor will not change for the duration of your course. However, it may be necessary to assign a new academic supervisor during the course of study or before registration for reasons which might include illness, sabbatical leave, parental leave or change in employment.

For further information please see our page on changes to courses and the provisions of the student contract regarding changes to courses.

Entry requirements for entry in 2024-25

Proven and potential academic excellence.

The requirements described below are specific to this course and apply only in the year of entry that is shown. Please be aware that any studentships that are linked to this course may have different or additional requirements and you should read any studentship information carefully before applying.

Degree-level qualifications

As a minimum, applicants should hold or be predicted to achieve the following UK qualifications or their equivalent:

  • a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours in any discipline.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA sought is 3.7 out of 4.0.

If your degree is not from the UK or another country specified above, visit our International Qualifications page for guidance on the qualifications and grades that would usually be considered to meet the University’s minimum entry requirements.

GRE General Test scores

No Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or GMAT scores are sought.

Other qualifications, evidence of excellence and relevant experience

  • Applicants should demonstrate an interest in interdisciplinary thinking and action in the area of conservation science and policy. In particular research and/or work experiences (including internships) in the areas of environmental governance, applied conservation, enterprise, management and/or activism.
  • You are not required to submit publications.

English language proficiency

This course requires proficiency in English at the University's  higher level . If your first language is not English, you may need to provide evidence that you meet this requirement. The minimum scores required to meet the University's higher level are detailed in the table below.

*Previously known as the Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) † Previously known as the Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English or Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE)

Your test must have been taken no more than two years before the start date of your course. Our Application Guide provides  further information about the English language test requirement .

Declaring extenuating circumstances

If your ability to meet the entry requirements has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic (eg you were awarded an unclassified/ungraded degree) or any other exceptional personal circumstance (eg other illness or bereavement), please refer to the guidance on extenuating circumstances in the Application Guide for information about how to declare this so that your application can be considered appropriately.

You will need to register three referees who can give an informed view of your academic ability and suitability for the course. The  How to apply  section of this page provides details of the types of reference that are required in support of your application for this course and how these will be assessed.

Supporting documents

You will be required to supply supporting documents with your application. The  How to apply  section of this page provides details of the supporting documents that are required as part of your application for this course and how these will be assessed.

Performance at interview

Interviews are not normally held as part of the admissions process.  

How your application is assessed

Your application will be assessed purely on your proven and potential academic excellence and other entry requirements described under that heading.

References  and  supporting documents  submitted as part of your application, and your performance at interview (if interviews are held) will be considered as part of the assessment process. Whether or not you have secured funding will not be taken into consideration when your application is assessed.

An overview of the shortlisting and selection process is provided below. Our ' After you apply ' pages provide  more information about how applications are assessed . 

Shortlisting and selection

Students are considered for shortlisting and selected for admission without regard to age, disability, gender reassignment, marital or civil partnership status, pregnancy and maternity, race (including colour, nationality and ethnic or national origins), religion or belief (including lack of belief), sex, sexual orientation, as well as other relevant circumstances including parental or caring responsibilities or social background. However, please note the following:

  • socio-economic information may be taken into account in the selection of applicants and award of scholarships for courses that are part of  the University’s pilot selection procedure  and for  scholarships aimed at under-represented groups ;
  • country of ordinary residence may be taken into account in the awarding of certain scholarships; and
  • protected characteristics may be taken into account during shortlisting for interview or the award of scholarships where the University has approved a positive action case under the Equality Act 2010.

Processing your data for shortlisting and selection

Information about  processing special category data for the purposes of positive action  and  using your data to assess your eligibility for funding , can be found in our Postgraduate Applicant Privacy Policy.

Admissions panels and assessors

All recommendations to admit a student involve the judgement of at least two members of the academic staff with relevant experience and expertise, and must also be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies or Admissions Committee (or equivalent within the department).

Admissions panels or committees will always include at least one member of academic staff who has undertaken appropriate training.

Other factors governing whether places can be offered

The following factors will also govern whether candidates can be offered places:

  • the ability of the University to provide the appropriate supervision for your studies, as outlined under the 'Supervision' heading in the  About  section of this page;
  • the ability of the University to provide appropriate support for your studies (eg through the provision of facilities, resources, teaching and/or research opportunities); and
  • minimum and maximum limits to the numbers of students who may be admitted to the University's taught and research programmes.

Offer conditions for successful applications

If you receive an offer of a place at Oxford, your offer will outline any conditions that you need to satisfy and any actions you need to take, together with any associated deadlines. These may include academic conditions, such as achieving a specific final grade in your current degree course. These conditions will usually depend on your individual academic circumstances and may vary between applicants. Our ' After you apply ' pages provide more information about offers and conditions . 

In addition to any academic conditions which are set, you will also be required to meet the following requirements:

Financial Declaration

If you are offered a place, you will be required to complete a  Financial Declaration  in order to meet your financial condition of admission.

Disclosure of criminal convictions

In accordance with the University’s obligations towards students and staff, we will ask you to declare any  relevant, unspent criminal convictions  before you can take up a place at Oxford.

The School of Geography and the Environment undertakes world-class interdisciplinary research, addresses societal and environmental problems, and advances knowledge within an intellectually vibrant, interdisciplinary research environment that combines natural and social sciences and has geography at its core. The department has six research clusters, in biodiversity, ecosystems and conservation; climate systems and policy; landscape dynamics; technological life; economy and society and political worlds, which hold seminars throughout term-time. Graduate students are encouraged to attend these seminars.

The University of Oxford has an extensive library system and the Radcliffe Science Library is the main lending service within the University for the material required for the course. The Social Sciences Library also holds collections which are valuable for students pursuing geography programmes.

The department has a computer room available for all graduate students. There are dedicated IT times each day when you can seek help from IT staff. There is a dedicated social space for MSc students where they can meet and discuss your studies. Where appropriate, you are able to use the departmental laboratories for your dissertation research.

Research skills training is provided in preparation for the dissertation. As well as developing an understanding of the research process, these sessions will cover such things as surveys, interviews, data analysis and statistical techniques. Field trips and visits to external organisations support the lectures and seminars and deliver valuable skills training.

Geography and the Environment

With over 200 graduate students from a range of nationalities, professional and disciplinary backgrounds, the School of Geography and the Environment at Oxford is one of the largest, most diverse and vibrant in the world. 

The school offers a number of graduate courses, ensuring that a suitable opportunity exists at Oxford regardless of whether you are planning a career in research, teaching or an environment-related profession, preparing for a career change or to take a career break.

There are several one-year MSc courses combining taught course modules with a dissertation. These courses offer a framework of core lectures, field courses, electives, and workshops and symposia for learning. Individual classes reflect the research interests of individual faculty and often mix seminar style teaching with discussions or practical exercises.

The two-year MPhil courses combine a substantial research component with master’s-level study, and the DPhil is an advanced research degree which involves three to four years of full-time original, independent research or a part-time pathway which involves six to eight years of research.

Research is supported in key areas of environmental, human and physical geography, from studies on migration, geopolitics, biogeography, climate change, flood risk, desertification, biological and cultural diversity, and many other areas.

View all courses   View taught courses View research courses

The University expects to be able to offer over 1,000 full or partial graduate scholarships across the collegiate University in 2024-25. You will be automatically considered for the majority of Oxford scholarships , if you fulfil the eligibility criteria and submit your graduate application by the relevant December or January deadline. Most scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic merit and/or potential. 

For further details about searching for funding as a graduate student visit our dedicated Funding pages, which contain information about how to apply for Oxford scholarships requiring an additional application, details of external funding, loan schemes and other funding sources.

Please ensure that you visit individual college websites for details of any college-specific funding opportunities using the links provided on our college pages or below:

Please note that not all the colleges listed above may accept students on this course. For details of those which do, please refer to the College preference section of this page.

Further information about funding opportunities for this course can be found on the school's website.

Annual fees for entry in 2024-25

Further details about fee status eligibility can be found on the fee status webpage.

Information about course fees

Course fees are payable each year, for the duration of your fee liability (your fee liability is the length of time for which you are required to pay course fees). For courses lasting longer than one year, please be aware that fees will usually increase annually. For details, please see our guidance on changes to fees and charges .

Course fees cover your teaching as well as other academic services and facilities provided to support your studies. Unless specified in the additional information section below, course fees do not cover your accommodation, residential costs or other living costs. They also don’t cover any additional costs and charges that are outlined in the additional information below.

Where can I find further information about fees?

The Fees and Funding  section of this website provides further information about course fees , including information about fee status and eligibility  and your length of fee liability .

Additional information

There are no compulsory elements of this course that entail additional costs beyond fees and living costs. However, as part of your course requirements, you may need to choose a dissertation, a project or a thesis topic. Please note that, depending on your choice of topic and the research required to complete it, you may incur additional expenses, such as travel expenses, research expenses, and field trips. You will need to meet these additional costs, although you may be able to apply for small grants from your department and/or college to help you cover some of these expenses.

Most costs associated with compulsory fieldwork are paid for by the department. This excludes the costs associated with obtaining the appropriate visa required to attend the non-UK based field trips. Non-EEA nationals might require a visa in order to travel to the country where the field trip is being held and any costs associated with obtaining the appropriate travel visa is the responsibility of the student. Students will also have to pay for some meals during the field course. Furthermore, as part of your course requirements you need to develop and research a dissertation topic. Depending on your choice of topic and the field work research required to complete it, you may incur additional costs (eg relating to travel, accommodation, field assistants, lab fees and/or research visas). You will need to meet these additional costs, although you may be able to apply for small grants/bursaries from your department and/or college to help you cover some of these expenses.

Living costs

In addition to your course fees, you will need to ensure that you have adequate funds to support your living costs for the duration of your course.

For the 2024-25 academic year, the range of likely living costs for full-time study is between c. £1,345 and £1,955 for each month spent in Oxford. Full information, including a breakdown of likely living costs in Oxford for items such as food, accommodation and study costs, is available on our living costs page. The current economic climate and high national rate of inflation make it very hard to estimate potential changes to the cost of living over the next few years. When planning your finances for any future years of study in Oxford beyond 2024-25, it is suggested that you allow for potential increases in living expenses of around 5% each year – although this rate may vary depending on the national economic situation. UK inflationary increases will be kept under review and this page updated.

Students enrolled on this course will belong to both a department/faculty and a college. Please note that ‘college’ and ‘colleges’ refers to all 43 of the University’s colleges, including those designated as societies and permanent private halls (PPHs). 

If you apply for a place on this course you will have the option to express a preference for one of the colleges listed below, or you can ask us to find a college for you. Before deciding, we suggest that you read our brief  introduction to the college system at Oxford  and our  advice about expressing a college preference . For some courses, the department may have provided some additional advice below to help you decide.

The following colleges accept students on the MSc in Biodiversity, Conservation and Management:

  • Blackfriars
  • Brasenose College
  • Campion Hall
  • Christ Church
  • Green Templeton College
  • Hertford College
  • Jesus College
  • Kellogg College
  • Lady Margaret Hall
  • Linacre College
  • Magdalen College
  • Mansfield College
  • Oriel College
  • The Queen's College
  • Regent's Park College
  • Reuben College
  • St Anne's College
  • St Catherine's College
  • St Cross College
  • St Edmund Hall
  • St Hilda's College
  • St Peter's College
  • Somerville College
  • Wolfson College
  • Worcester College
  • Wycliffe Hall

Before you apply

Our  guide to getting started  provides general advice on how to prepare for and start your application. Check the deadlines on this page and the information about deadlines  in our Application Guide. If it's important for you to have your application considered under a particular deadline – eg under a December or January deadline in order to be considered for Oxford scholarships – we recommend that you aim to complete and submit your application at least two weeks in advance .

Application fee waivers

An application fee of £75 is payable per course application. Application fee waivers are available for the following applicants who meet the eligibility criteria:

  • applicants from low-income countries;
  • refugees and displaced persons; 
  • UK applicants from low-income backgrounds; and 
  • applicants who applied for our Graduate Access Programmes in the past two years and met the eligibility criteria.

You are encouraged to  check whether you're eligible for an application fee waiver  before you apply.

Do I need to contact anyone before I apply?

You do not need to make contact with the department before you apply but you are encouraged to visit the relevant departmental webpages to read any further information about your chosen course.

Completing your application

You should refer to the information below when completing the application form, paying attention to the specific requirements for the supporting documents .

For this course, the application form will include questions that collect information that would usually be included in a CV/résumé. You should not upload a separate document. If a separate CV/résumé is uploaded, it will be removed from your application .

If any document does not meet the specification, including the stipulated word count, your application may be considered incomplete and not assessed by the academic department. Expand each section to show further details.

Referees: Three overall, of which at least two must be academic

Whilst you must register three referees, the department may start the assessment of your application if two of the three references are submitted by the course deadline and your application is otherwise complete. Please note that you may still be required to ensure your third referee supplies a reference for consideration.

Your references will support your academic achievements, interests, and personal motivation. In order to assist assessors in their consideration of applications references should be from experienced scholars and teachers of graduate students. In view of this, it is recommended that at least two of the three references are from academics.

Official transcript(s)

Your transcripts should give detailed information of the individual grades received in your university-level qualifications to date. You should only upload official documents issued by your institution and any transcript not in English should be accompanied by a certified translation.

More information about the transcript requirement is available in the Application Guide.

Personal statement: A maximum of 1,000 words

Your statement should be written in English and explain your motivation for applying for the course at Oxford, your relevant experience and education, and the specific areas that interest you and/or you intend to specialise in.

If possible, please ensure that the word count is clearly displayed on the document.

This will be assessed for:

  • your reasons for applying
  • evidence of your enthusiasm for the proposed area of study, over and above what would be expected from an undergraduate course of instruction
  • the ability to present a reasoned case in English
  • commitment to the subject, beyond the requirements of the degree course
  • capacity for sustained and intense work
  • reasoning ability
  • ability to absorb new ideas, often presented abstractly, at a rapid pace.

Your statement should focus on the subject area rather than personal achievements, interests and aspirations. This might be demonstrated by, for example, having undertaken independent fieldwork or research, vacation employment in a relevant discipline, or having already made research publications or presentations.

If you have already graduated, at least some of the time since graduation should have been spent on activities related to the proposed course of study, or a sound reason why this is not the case should be given.

Written work: One essay of 2,000 words

The written work must be in English and can be an essay you have written, a chapter of  a thesis, a published scholarly paper or even academic work written specifically to support your application.

This work should demonstrate your ability to write a good academic document though it does not need to be related to the proposed area of study.

An extract of the requisite length from longer work is permissible. The word count does not need to include any bibliography or brief footnotes.

This will be assessed for evidence of good basic knowledge, understanding of problems, powers of analysis, ability to construct a coherent train of thought, and to shape an argument, and powers of expression. The quality of English expression and of presentation may also be part of the assessment. Students with disclosed disabilities will receive appropriate consideration according to their particular needs.

Start or continue your application

You can start or return to an application using the relevant link below. As you complete the form, please  refer to the requirements above  and  consult our Application Guide for advice . You'll find the answers to most common queries in our FAQs.

Application Guide   Apply

ADMISSION STATUS

Open to applications for entry in 2024-25

12:00 midday UK time on:

Friday 10 November 2023 Applications more likely to receive earlier decisions

Friday 19 January 2024 Latest deadline for most Oxford scholarships Final application deadline for entry in 2024-25

*Three-year average (applications for entry in 2021-22 to 2023-24)

Further information and enquiries

This course is offered by the School of Geography and Environment

  • Course page on the school's website
  • Funding information from the school
  • Academic and research staff
  • Research in the school
  • Social Sciences Division
  • Residence requirements for full-time courses
  • Postgraduate applicant privacy policy

Course-related enquiries

Advice about contacting the department can be found in the How to apply section of this page

✉  [email protected] ☎  +44 (0)1865 285070

Application-process enquiries

See the application guide

Other courses to consider

You may also wish to consider applying to other courses that are similar or related to this course:

Oxford 1+1 MBA

You can study this course in combination with our MBA, as part of our  1+1 MBA programme .

Junze Shi wins Economic Geography Research Group Undergraduate Dissertation Prize

The Royal Geographical Society with IBG's Economic Geography Research Group has named Junze Shi as the winner of their 2022 undergraduate dissertation prize. Junze recently graduated from the BA in Geography course at the University of Oxford's School of Geography and the Environment (SoGE).

Junze's dissertation explores the impact of the Covid-19 lockdown on a Chinese commercial bank operating in the City of London. Economic Geography has long placed an emphasis on physical proximity as the most important condition for knowledge transfer and accessing information, particularly within financial centres. The lockdown provided the opportunity for a massive social experiment to test how the sudden absence of proximity impacted the operations of a bank. His dissertation focused on internal relations (between staff and departments) and external relations within and across financial centres (clients, other banks, business services, international offices etc.).

Junze said, "Taking the Geographies of Finance module coincided with a Hilary Term spent at home during lockdown. Working through the reading I thought to myself, some of the existing theories on financial centres must have been negated by remote work. Once I pitched my idea to my supervisor, I knew this was a rare opportunity to plug a gap in the literature."

"It was fascinating to see the responses from different departments within the bank. I expected the front-office to have a hard time given they were client-facing and had regular face-to-face meetings, but it was just as challenging for back-office staff to conduct their support functions. Overall, while the effects diminished with time, technology and pre-existing relations could only substitute physical proximity to a certain extent. Face-to-face interactions still reigned supreme."

"I am very honored to have been awarded this prize for my dissertation. This award is a testament to the world-class teaching offered by the SoGE at Oxford and the wonderful diversity of the BA Geography course. I am especially thankful to my supervisor who guided me throughout the entire research and write-up process. I would also like to thank my tutors at St John's College for their teaching and support. I feel very fortunate to have had an amazing three years at Oxford and winning this award was the cherry on top."

Each year, the Royal Geographical Society's Research Groups recognise outstanding work from undergraduate and postgraduate students at higher education institutions both in the UK and overseas. More information about the prize is available on the RGS with IBG website .

IN THE MEDIA 14 Dec 2023 $5 trillion in nature-related global economic risks will amplify climate change

IN THE MEDIA 13 Dec 2023 COP28 Expert Comment from across Oxford University

IN THE MEDIA 13 Dec 2023 COP28: countries have pledged to cut emissions from cooling – here’s how to make it happen

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The Dissertation: From Beginning to End

The Dissertation: From Beginning to End

Associate Professor

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This book is intended to be read at any stage in the dissertation process, but will be particularly useful in the early stages of preparation for a social work dissertation, and as a reference resource throughout. The book is a guide to successful dissertation completion. Content includes a brief history and overview of social work doctoral education in the United States, the importance of values in social work, and the relationship between personal, research, and social work values. Chapter 2 addresses issues in selecting and working with the dissertation supervisor and committee, as well as the role and tasks of all three parties in successful completion of the dissertation. In Chapter 3 strategies for researching, and evaluating the literature, as well as writing the literature review are discussed. In addition, the relevance of theory to social work research is examined. Chapter 4 describes ethical issues in social research and requirements for the protection of human subjects. In addition, an overview of both quantitative and qualitative research methods is provided. In Chapter 5 sample design and sample size are discussed in relation to both quantitative and qualitative research. The significance of the psychometric properties of measurement instruments is also discussed. Chapter 6 addresses issues in data collection, data management, and data analysis in qualitative and quantitative research. Finally Chapter 7 presents strategies for dissertation writing including structure and content, as well as data presentation.

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IMAGES

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COMMENTS

  1. Theses and Dissertations

    Thesis: In the UK, a thesis is normally a document that presents an author's research findings as part of a doctoral or research programme. Dissertation: In the UK, a dissertation is normally a document that presents an author's research findings as part of an undergraduate or master's programme. DPhil:

  2. Oxford theses

    You can use ProQuest Dissertations & Theses: UK & Ireland to find bibliographic details of Oxford theses not on SOLO. To find the shelfmarks of such theses, apply to the staff of the Weston Library's Charles Wendell David Reading Room who will ask the Rare Books department to check the card catalogue of non-scientific theses that are not in SOLO.

  3. Theses and dissertations

    Libraries Collections and resources Services Ask and support Join About Collections and resources Theses and dissertations SOLO Recommend a purchase Theses and dissertations Read our guidance for finding and accessing theses and dissertations held by the Bodleian Libraries and other institutions.

  4. Guidelines to Writing a Research Proposal

    Overview All Doctor of Philosophy (DPhil) students must write an acceptable research proposal. This has a clear and explicit purpose: it makes certain that you have a worthwhile research project - you have a good grasp of the relevant literature and the major issues, and that your methodology is sound;

  5. Oxford LibGuides: Geography and the Environment: Home

    Theses and Dissertations ; Purpose of this guide. This guide is intended for students and researchers studying Geography at the University of Oxford, although students and researchers from any field may find it useful. Use this guide to find out about books and online resources for geography, including ebooks, ejournals and databases. ...

  6. Geography

    Overview Structure Admissions Requirements Careers Fees and funding Studying at Oxford Course overview UCAS code: L700 Entrance requirements: A*AA Course duration: 3 years (BA) Subject requirements Required subjects: Not applicable Recommended subjects: Geography Helpful subjects: Not applicable Other course requirements Admissions tests: GAT

  7. DPhil in Geography and the Environment

    The Doctor of Philosophy (DPhil) in Geography and the Environment is the department's premier research degree, awarded to candidates who have successfully completed a major piece of original research. The course provides support and an intellectual environment to pursue your own independent research.

  8. Theses and Dissertations

    Thesis: In the UK, a thesis is normally a document that presents an author's research findings as part of a doctoral or research programme. Dissertation: In the UK, a dissertation is normally a document that presents an author's research findings as part of an undergraduate or master's programme. DPhil:

  9. Our course structure

    All students take the ' Geographical Thought ' core subject, two foundational subjects (see below), and three optional subjects, and they submit a dissertation and a fieldwork report. There are so many wonderful things about studying geography at Oxford.

  10. Postgraduate study

    Welcome With over 200 graduate students from a range of nationalities, professional and disciplinary backgrounds we are one of the largest, most diverse and vibrant graduate schools in the world offering advanced degrees in Geography and the Environment.

  11. Theses and Dissertations

    The library holds dissertations from the following departments: Criminology, Economics, Geography and the Environment, International Development, Politics and International Relations (note that MPhil Politics and International Relations dissertations are held in the Bodleian Library), Socio-Legal Studies and Social Policy and Intervention.

  12. PDF Geography Information Sheet for entry in 2021

    The Oxford Geography degree focuses on the interrelationships between society and the physical and human environment. Students are introduced to the full range of geographical topics in the foundational courses, which they can then follow up in more detail in the optional papers.

  13. Our research

    Cross-cutting the School, and embracing geographers in other departments, are seven research clusters: Biodiversity, Ecosystems and Conservation; Climate Systems; Economy and Society; Environmental Interactions; Landscape Dynamics; Political Worlds; and Technological Life.

  14. Why study Geography at Oxford?

    Geography at Oxford is: Relevant … to the challenges facing the planet in the 21st century. Interdisciplinary and flexible … allowing you to pursue your interests, whether they are in physical, environmental, or human geography, or at the disciplinary intersection.

  15. Oxford LibGuides: Geography and the Environment: Theses

    Geography and the Environment: Theses Guide to the latest and most useful research resources for geography and the environment Subjects: Development Studies , Environment , Geography , Internet + Media Studies , Social Policy + Social Work

  16. PDF BA in Geography

    www.geog.ox.ac.uk/undergraduate "Oxford provides a holistic approach to geography, instead of focusing on purely human or physical geography. Each week you have a tutorial with a leading academic - it is a challenging and rewarding experience that can't be found in many universities."

  17. Home

    Geography at the University of Oxford is a large, vibrant and intellectually diverse community comprising the core academic department of the School of Geography and the Environment, its three research centres: the Environmental Change Institute (ECI), the Transport Studies Unit (TSU) and the Smith School of Enterprise and Environment (SSEE) and...

  18. Education

    Education - Dissertations, Theses and Current Research. Browse our best resources, organized by subject. 434 SUBJECTS. Guides.

  19. MSc / MPhil in Environmental Change and Management

    A 15,000 word dissertation; Our approach combines directed teaching, self-regulated learning, discussion, and formal assessment. Aims The course overarching aims are to: ... The University of Oxford, School of Geography and the Environment, and Environmental Change Institute are committed to fostering an inclusive culture which promotes ...

  20. Submission date and extension of time

    You are expected to submit your thesis within seven or at most eight years of starting your doctoral course. You will lose your DPhil status if you have failed to complete your thesis within 24 terms of being admitted as a research student, and will no longer be registered as a student of the University.

  21. MSc in Biodiversity, Conservation and Management

    In the third term, during which students commence their dissertation research, supervisors will usually be found within the School of Geography and the Environment. ... With over 200 graduate students from a range of nationalities, professional and disciplinary backgrounds, the School of Geography and the Environment at Oxford is one of the ...

  22. Junze Shi wins Economic Geography Research Group ...

    The Royal Geographical Society with IBG's Economic Geography Research Group has named Junze Shi as the winner of their 2022 undergraduate dissertation prize. Junze recently graduated from the BA in Geography course at the University of Oxford's School of Geography and the Environment (SoGE).

  23. The Dissertation: From Beginning to End

    Abstract. This book is intended to be read at any stage in the dissertation process, but will be particularly useful in the early stages of preparation for a social work dissertation, and as a reference resource throughout. The book is a guide to successful dissertation completion. Content includes a brief history and overview of social work ...